Portal:LGBT

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LGBT
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Lesbian Couple from back holding hands.jpg 3721 - Gay Pride di Milano, 2007 - Foto Giovanni Dall'Orto, 23-Jun-2007.jpg Flying rainbow flag at Taiwan Pride 20041106.jpg Same Sex Marriage-02.jpg

Introduction

Stonewall Inn 5 pride weekend 2016.jpg

LGBT (or GLBT) is an initialism that stands for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender. In use since the 1990s, the term is an adaptation of the initialism LGB, which was used to replace the term gay in reference to the LGBT community beginning in the mid-to-late 1980s. Activists believed that the term gay community did not accurately represent all those to whom it referred.

The initialism has become adopted into the mainstream as an umbrella term for use when labeling topics pertaining to sexuality and gender identity. For example, the LGBT Movement Advancement Project termed community centres, which have services specific to those members of the LGBT community, as "LGBT community centers", in a comprehensive studies of such centres around the United States.

The initialism LGBT is intended to emphasize a diversity of sexuality and gender identity-based cultures. It may be used to refer to anyone who is non-heterosexual or non-cisgender, instead of exclusively to people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. To recognize this inclusion, a popular variant adds the letter Q for those who identify as queer or are questioning their sexual identity; LGBTQ has been recorded since 1996. Those who add intersex people to LGBT groups or organizing use an extended initialism LGBTI. The two acronyms are sometimes combined to form the terms LGBTIQ or LGBT+ to encompass spectrums of sexuality and gender. Other, less common variants also exist, motivated by a desire for inclusivity, including those over twice as long which have prompted criticism.

Selected article

And the Band Played On: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic is a best-selling work of nonfiction written by San Francisco Chronicle journalist Randy Shilts published in 1987. It chronicles the discovery and spread of HIV and AIDS with a special emphasis on government indifference and political infighting to what was initially perceived as a gay disease, that has impacted the United States and the world for decades after.

Selected quote

Nick Clegg, speaking out against homophobia

Current events

Selected image

Torero and Picador, by Helmut Kolle, ca. 1927
Helmut Kolle was a German modernist painter who emigrated to France where he lived together with art collector Wilhelm Uhde for the rest of his life (which was unfortunately cut short by heart disease). Kolle's paintings almost exclusively feature males—at the start of his career rather effeminate-looking boys, sometime later muscular men, particularly sailors, toreros, and soldiers, usually in poses that are rarely overtly homosexual but certainly suggestive, at least to gay viewers. In this painting from about 1927 a torero puts his hand softly on the shoulder of a picador.


All selected pictures
Commons-logo.svg See Category:LGBT for more LGBT-related images

Selected biography

Quentin Crisp in 1982

Quentin Crisp (25 December 1908 – 21 November 1999), born Denis Charles Pratt, was an English writer and raconteur. He became a gay icon in the 1970s after publication of his memoir, The Naked Civil Servant, brought to the attention of the general public his defiant exhibitionism and longstanding refusal to remain in the closet.

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