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The Louisville Portal

Louis XVI statue JCC.jpg

Louisville (Listeni/ˈlvɪl/, local Listeni/ˈl.əvəl/ or Listeni/ˈlʌvəl/) is the largest city in the U.S. state of Kentucky, and the county seat of Jefferson County. Since 2003, the city's borders have been coterminous with those of the county because of a city-county merger. The city's population at the 2010 census was 741,096. An important internal shipping port in the 19th century, Louisville today is best known as the location of the Kentucky Derby, the first of three annual thoroughbred horse races making up the Triple Crown.

Louisville is situated on the Ohio River in north-central Kentucky at the Falls of the Ohio. Because it includes counties in Southern Indiana, the Louisville metropolitan area is often referred to as Kentuckiana. The river forms the border between Kentucky and Indiana. A resident of Louisville is referred to as a Louisvillian. Although situated in a Southern state, Louisville is influenced by both Southern and Midwestern culture. It is sometimes referred to as either the northernmost Southern city or the southernmost Northern city in the United States.

The settlement that became the city of Louisville was founded in 1778 by George Rogers Clark and is named after King Louis XVI of France.

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Freedom Hall is a multipurpose arena in Louisville, Kentucky on the grounds of the Kentucky Exposition Center, which is owned by the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The maximum capacity of the arena is 19,200 for concerts, and 18,865 for basketball. While it is used to host a variety of events, it is most famous for its use as a basketball arena, most notably serving as the basketball home of the University of Louisville Cardinals, and for one game per season as an alternate home court for the University of Kentucky Wildcats. The Cardinals started playing basketball there in December 1956 with a contest against the University of Notre Dame, both of whom are now full-time members of the Big East Conference. Their first full season in the facility was the following season. In addition to being the home of the Cardinals, Freedom Hall has hosted NCAA Tournament games ten times, including six Final Fours between 1958 and 1969. The arena has also hosted 11 conference tournaments, nine Metr

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Pigeon Roost.jpg
Photo credit: C. Bedford Crenshaw
Pigeon Roost State Historic Site is the site of a massacre by Shawnee Indians.

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Jefferson General Hospital was the third-largest hospital during the American Civil War, located at Port Fulton, Indiana (now part of Jeffersonville, Indiana) and was active between February 21, 1864 and December 1866. The land was owned by U.S Senator from Indiana Jesse D. Bright. Bright was sympathetic to the Confederates, and was expelled from his position as Senator in 1862. Union authorities took the property without compensation, similar to what happened at Arlington National Cemetery.

Eventually, a man named James Holt came into ownership of the property. At his death he bequeathed the property to his Masonic Lodge, Clark Lodge #40 as a Masonic orphans home around 1915.

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On this day in Louisville history...

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The Filson Historical Society (originally named the Filson Club) is a historical society in Louisville, Kentucky. The organization was founded in 1884 and named after early Kentucky explorer John Filson, who wrote The Discovery, Settlement, and Present State of Kentucke, which included one of the first maps of the state. The Filson's extensive collections focus on Kentucky, the Upper South, and the Ohio River Valley. Its research facilities include a manuscript collection as well as a library that includes rare books, periodicals, maps, and other published materials. The Filson also maintains a small museum. One intriguing possession of the museum is a section of American beech tree trunk, with the carved legend "D. Boon kilt a bar 1803."

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Louis Dembitz Brandeis (November 13, 1856 – October 5, 1941) was an American litigator, Supreme Court Justice, advocate of privacy, and developer of the Brandeis Brief. In addition, he helped lead the American Zionist movement.

Justice Brandeis was appointed by Woodrow Wilson to the Supreme Court of the United States in 1916 (sworn-in on June 5), and served until 1939. Many were surprised that Wilson — son of a Christian minister — would appoint to the highest court in the land the very first Jewish Supreme Court Justice.

As an octogenarian, Brandeis was deeply offended by his friend Franklin Roosevelt's court-packing scheme of 1937, with its implication that elderly justices needed special help to carry out their duties. Brandeis retired from the Court in 1939, to be replaced by William O. Douglas.


  • “It all keeps me busy, I love Louisville. I'll always be in Louisville.”Paul Hornung
  • “It's important to support this because of what happened right here. It's like living in Louisville and someone never having been to the Derby. I don't think a lot of people realize what goes on here.”Mark Wells
  • “As the state's biggest city, Louisville sets the precedent.” – Mike Kuntz

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