Portal:Louisville

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The Louisville Portal

Louis XVI statue JCC.jpg

Louisville (Listeni/ˈlvɪl/, local Listeni/ˈl.əvəl/ or Listeni/ˈlʌvəl/) is the largest city in the U.S. state of Kentucky, and the county seat of Jefferson County. Since 2003, the city's borders have been coterminous with those of the county because of a city-county merger. The city's population at the 2010 census was 741,096. An important internal shipping port in the 19th century, Louisville today is best known as the location of the Kentucky Derby, the first of three annual thoroughbred horse races making up the Triple Crown.

Louisville is situated on the Ohio River in north-central Kentucky at the Falls of the Ohio. Because it includes counties in Southern Indiana, the Louisville metropolitan area is often referred to as Kentuckiana. The river forms the border between Kentucky and Indiana. A resident of Louisville is referred to as a Louisvillian. Although situated in a Southern state, Louisville is influenced by both Southern and Midwestern culture. It is sometimes referred to as either the northernmost Southern city or the southernmost Northern city in the United States.

The settlement that became the city of Louisville was founded in 1778 by George Rogers Clark and is named after King Louis XVI of France.

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Freedom Hall is a multipurpose arena in Louisville, Kentucky on the grounds of the Kentucky Exposition Center, which is owned by the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The maximum capacity of the arena is 19,200 for concerts, and 18,865 for basketball. While it is used to host a variety of events, it is most famous for its use as a basketball arena, most notably serving as the basketball home of the University of Louisville Cardinals, and for one game per season as an alternate home court for the University of Kentucky Wildcats. The Cardinals started playing basketball there in December 1956 with a contest against the University of Notre Dame, both of whom are now full-time members of the Big East Conference. Their first full season in the facility was the following season. In addition to being the home of the Cardinals, Freedom Hall has hosted NCAA Tournament games ten times, including six Final Fours between 1958 and 1969. The arena has also hosted 11 conference tournaments, nine Metr

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Pigeon Roost.jpg
Photo credit: C. Bedford Crenshaw
Pigeon Roost State Historic Site is the site of a massacre by Shawnee Indians.

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Charlestown State Park is an Indiana state park on 2,400 acres (9.71 km2) in Clark County, Indiana, in the United States. The park is on the banks of the Ohio River, 1 mile (1.6 km) east of Charlestown. It was once part of the Indiana Army Ammunition Plant (INAAP), and was donated in separate parcels to the Indiana state government. In 1993, the state of Indiana was given 859 acres (3.48 km2) , and in 1994 was given an additional 1,125 acres (4.55 km2) . When the park opened in 1996, it encompassed 2,400 acres (9.71 km2). With an additional 2,600 acres (10.52 km2) given by the INAAP in 2004, the park has 5,100 acres (20.64 km2), making it the third largest state park in Indiana.

There are still railroad tracks and private houses on the property, and the Indiana state government is still deciding what to do with them. Future developments confirmed by the state for the park include a swimming pool, access to Rose Island via a pedestrian bridge, more trails, improvements to the campground, cabins, and maybe even a state park inn.

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On this day in Louisville history...

  • (1971) WDRB, Channel 41, begins televising
  • (1975) Kentucky State Board of Education orders the merger of the Louisville Schools system and Jefferson County Schools.

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Farmington is an 18-acre historic site in Louisville, Kentucky, was once the center of a hemp plantation owned by John and Lucy Speed. The 14-room, Federal-style brick home possibly based on a design by Thomas Jefferson and has several Jeffersonian architectural features.

The Farmington site was part of a military land grant given to Captain James Speed in 1780. His son, John Speed, completed Farmington on a tract of land in 1816. Built in the Federal architectural style, the house is based on plans by Thomas Jefferson, which are now in the Coolidge Library of Massachusetts Historical Society.

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Colonel Sanders (September 9, 1890 – December 16, 1980), whose full name was Harland David Sanders, was the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC). His image is omnipresent in the chain's advertising and packaging.

At the age of 40, Sanders cooked chicken dishes for people who stopped at his service station in Corbin, Kentucky. Since he did not have a restaurant, he served customers in his living quarters in the service station. Eventually, his local popularity grew, and Sanders moved to a motel and restaurant that seated 142 people and worked as the chef. Over the next nine years, he perfected his method of cooking chicken. Furthermore, he made use of a pressure fryer that allowed the chicken to be cooked much faster than by pan-frying. He was given the honorary title "Kentucky Colonel" in 1935 by Governor Ruby Laffoon. Sanders chose to call himself "Colonel" and to dress in a stereotypical "southern gentleman" costume as a way of self-promotion. Sanders sold his franchise in 1964, although he remained their corporate spokesman until his death.

Quotes

  • “It all keeps me busy, I love Louisville. I'll always be in Louisville.”Paul Hornung
  • “It's important to support this because of what happened right here. It's like living in Louisville and someone never having been to the Derby. I don't think a lot of people realize what goes on here.”Mark Wells
  • “As the state's biggest city, Louisville sets the precedent.” – Mike Kuntz

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