Portal:Marvin Gaye

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Introduction

Gaye in 1973

Marvin Pentz Gaye (born Gay Jr.; April 2, 1939 – April 1, 1984) was an American singer, songwriter and record producer. Gaye helped to shape the sound of Motown in the 1960s, first as an in-house session player and later as a solo artist with a string of hits, including "Ain't That Peculiar", "How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You)" and "I Heard It Through the Grapevine", and duet recordings with Mary Wells, Kim Weston, Diana Ross and Tammi Terrell, later earning the titles "Prince of Motown" and "Prince of Soul".

During the 1970s, he recorded the albums What's Going On and Let's Get It On and became one of the first artists in Motown (joint with Stevie Wonder) to break away from the reins of a production company. His later recordings influenced several contemporary R&B subgenres, such as quiet storm and neo soul. Following a period in Europe as a tax exile in the early 1980s, he released the 1982 Grammy Award-winning hit "Sexual Healing" and its parent album Midnight Love.

Selected song


"I Heard It Through the Grapevine" is a landmark song in the history of Motown Records. Written by Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong in 1966, the single was first recorded by Smokey Robinson & the Miracles. Released on September 25, 1967 as Soul 35039 by Gladys Knight & the Pips, who recorded the third version of the song, it has since become a signature song, however, for singer Marvin Gaye, who recorded the second version of the song prior to the Pips' version but released the song after theirs on October 30, 1968 as Tamla 54176. Creedence Clearwater Revival released their popular version of the song in 1970. It was referenced in Talkin' 'Bout Your Generation.

Gaye's version has since become a landmark in pop music. In 2004, it ranked #80 on Rolling Stone's list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.[1] On the commemorative 50th Anniversary of the Billboard Hot 100 issue of Billboard magazine in June 2008, Gaye's version was ranked as the 65th biggest song on the chart.[2] It was also inducted to the Grammy Hall of Fame for "historical, artistic and significant" value.

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Selected duet


Diana & Marvin is a duets album by soul musicians Diana Ross and Marvin Gaye, released October 26, 1973 on Motown. Recording sessions for the album took place in 1972 and 1973 at Motown Recording Studios in Hollywood, California. Featuring vocal collaborations by Gaye and Ross, whom at the time had widely become recognized as two of the top soul and pop performers, respectively, Diana & Marvin became a multi-chart success. However, it did not equal the sales of the two singers' previous efforts, even though it managed to sell near a million copies worldwide.

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Selected album


Let's Get It On is the twelfth studio album by American soul musician Marvin Gaye, released August 28, 1973 on Tamla Records in the United States. Recording sessions for the album took place during June 1970 to July 1973 at Hitsville U.S.A. and Golden World Studio in Detroit and at Hitsville West in Los Angeles. Serving as Gaye's first venture into the funk genre and romance-themed music, Let's Get It On incorporates smooth soul, doo-wop, and quiet storm. It has been noted by critics for its sexually-suggestive lyrics, and was cited by one writer as "one of the most sexually charged albums ever recorded".

The album has been regarded by many music writers and critics as a landmark recording in soul music. It furthered funk music's popularity during the 1970s, and its smooth soul sound marked a change for his record label's previous success with the "Motown Sound" formula.

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  1. ^ "The RS 500 Greatest Songs of All Time". RollingStone.com. Retrieved 2007-06-02.
  2. ^ "Billboard's Greatest Songs of All Time". Billboard.com. Retrieved 2009-02-01.