Portal:Middle-earth/Selected picture

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Usage

The layout design for these subpages is at Portal:Middle-earth/Selected picture/Layout.

  1. Add a new Selected picture to the next available subpage.
  2. Update "max=" to new total for its {{Random portal component}} on the main page.

Remember that "fair use" pictures may not be displayed on Portal pages.

Selected pictures list

Selected picture 1

Portal:Middle-earth/Selected picture/1

Tolkien The two trees.jpg
Credit: Julia Pelzer

The Two Trees of Valinor in the fictional universe of J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-earth are Telperion and Laurelin, the Silver Tree and the Gold Tree that brought light to the Land of the Valar in ancient times. They were destroyed by Melkor and Ungoliant the great spider. Morgoth/Melkor stabbed each of the trees with his spear, and Ungoliant drank them dry. But the last flower of Telperion and the last fruit of Laurelin were made by the Valar into the Moon and the Sun.

Selected picture 2

Portal:Middle-earth/Selected picture/2

Hobbiton, as depicted in the Lord of the Rings films
Credit: Rob Chandler (Rob & Jules)

The Shire is a region of J. R. R. Tolkien's fictional Middle-earth, described in The Lord of the Rings and other works. The Shire refers to an area settled exclusively by Hobbits and largely removed from the goings-on in the rest of Middle-earth. It is located in the northwest of the continent, in the large region of Eriador and the Kingdom of Arnor.

Hobbiton, a village in the Westfarthing of the Shire, is the home of Bilbo and Frodo Baggins. It was re-created at Matamata, New Zealand for the filming of Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings film series. The film location (pictured) has become a tourist attraction.

Selected picture 3

Portal:Middle-earth/Selected picture/3

Mount Sunday, right foreground, and the Southern Alps
Credit: PhillipC

The White Mountains, a loose translation of the Sindarin Ered Nimrais "Whitehorn Mountains", is a fictional mountain range in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth. The mountains are named after the glaciers of their highest peaks. The range lies mostly East-West, but also has a northern section, which is separated from the main line of the Misty Mountains by the Gap of Rohan.

In Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings film series, the Southern Alps (pictured, background) in New Zealand became the White Mountains, and Mount Sunday (right foreground) was used as the set of Edoras, the seat of King Théoden.

Selected picture 4

Portal:Middle-earth/Selected picture/4

A representation of the Ruling Ring
Credit: Osa 150

The One Ring is a fictional artefact that appears as the central plot element in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth fantasy novels. It is described in an earlier story, The Hobbit (1937), as a magic ring of invisibility. The sequel The Lord of the Rings (1954–55) describes its powers as being more encompassing than invisibility, and states that the Ring is in fact malevolent. The Lord of the Rings concerns the quest to destroy the Ring, which was created by the primary antagonist, Sauron.