Portal:Money

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The Money Portal

Euro coins and banknotes
A sample picture of a fictional ATM card. The largest part of the world's money exists only as accounting numbers which are transferred between financial computers. Various plastic cards and other devices give individual consumers the power to electronically transfer such money to and from their bank accounts, without the use of currency.

Money is any item or verifiable record that is generally accepted as payment for goods and services and repayment of debts, such as taxes, in a particular country or socio-economic context. The main functions of money are distinguished as: a medium of exchange, a unit of account, a store of value and sometimes, a standard of deferred payment. Any item or verifiable record that fulfils these functions can be considered as money.

Money is historically an emergent market phenomenon establishing a commodity money, but nearly all contemporary money systems are based on fiat money. Fiat money, like any check or note of debt, is without use value as a physical commodity. It derives its value by being declared by a government to be legal tender; that is, it must be accepted as a form of payment within the boundaries of the country, for "all debts, public and private".[better source needed] Counterfeit money can cause good money to lose its value.

The money supply of a country consists of currency (banknotes and coins) and, depending on the particular definition used, one or more types of bank money (the balances held in checking accounts, savings accounts, and other types of bank accounts). Bank money, which consists only of records (mostly computerized in modern banking), forms by far the largest part of broad money in developed countries. (Full article...)

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Coins from the game Century: Spice Road

Play money is noticeably fake bills or coins intended to be used as toy currency, especially for classroom instruction or as a marker in board games such as Monopoly, rather than currency in a legitimate exchange market. Play money coins and bills are collected widely. They can be found made from metals, cardboard or, more frequently today, plastic. For card games such as poker, casino tokens are commonly used instead.

In 1997, the Winston Million (a cash prize award program on the NASCAR Winston Cup Series) was won by Jeff Gordon at the Mountain Dew Southern 500. A Brinks truck led him around the victory lap, spewing bags of Winston play money. (Full article...)
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Reverse
FERNANDVS ET ELISABET DEI GR[ATIA]
"Ferdinand and Elisabeth, by the Grace of God"
Displays the arms of the Catholic Monarchs post 1492, with Granada in base. Letter S on the left is the sign of the mint of Seville and VIII on the right i.e. eight in roman numerals.

The Spanish dollar, also known as the piece of eight (Spanish: Real de a ocho, Dólar, Peso duro, Peso fuerte or Peso), is a silver coin of approximately 38 mm (1.5 in) diameter worth eight Spanish reales. It was minted in the Spanish Empire following a monetary reform in 1497. It was widely used as the first international currency because of its uniformity in standard and milling characteristics. Some countries countermarked the Spanish dollar so it could be used as their local currency.

The Spanish dollar was the coin upon which the original United States dollar was based, and it remained legal tender in the United States until the Coinage Act of 1857. Because it was widely used in Europe, the Americas, and the Far East, it became the first world currency by the late 18th century. Aside from the U.S. dollar, several other currencies, such as the Canadian dollar, the Japanese yen, the Chinese yuan, the Philippine peso, and several currencies in the rest of the Americas, were initially based on the Spanish dollar and other 8-real coins. Diverse theories link the origin of the "$" symbol to the columns and stripes that appear on one side of the Spanish dollar. (Full article...)

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In the news

21 June 2021 –
A judge in Peru rejects a plea from public prosecutor José Domingo Pérez to send Popular Force party leader and presidential candidate Keiko Fujimori back to prison for allegedly violating her bail conditions over charges of money laundering and corruption. Pérez says that he will appeal the judge's ruling. (DW)
2 June 2021 –
Nicaraguan opposition figure Cristiana Chamorro Barrios is placed under house arrest in Managua as the government accuses her of money laundering. (Bangkok Post)
26 May 2021 –
Former South African President Jacob Zuma pleads not guilty to multiple charges, including corruption, fraud, racketeering and money laundering, relating to a $2 billion arms deal in 1999. Zuma said that the charges were politically motivated by a rival section of the ruling African National Congress. (Reuters)
20 May 2021 – Colonial Pipeline cyberattack‎
In the aftermath of the attack, it is revealed at a Senate Armed Services cyber subcommittee hearing that the Department of Homeland Security was not alerted to the ransomware attack and that the Justice Department was not alerted to the ransom type or the amount of money demanded, prompting discussion about the numerous information silos in the government and difficulties of information-sharing between them. (USNI News)

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