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Portal:New York (state)

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Introduction

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New York is a state in the Northeastern United States. New York was one of the original Thirteen Colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.85 million residents in 2017, it is the fourth most populous state. To distinguish the state from the city with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State.

The state's most populous city, New York City, makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island. The state and city were both named for the 17th century Duke of York, the future King James II of England. With an estimated population of 8.55 million in 2015, New York City is the most populous city in the United States and the premier gateway for legal immigration to the United States. The New York metropolitan area is one of the most populous in the world. New York City is a global city, home to the United Nations Headquarters and has been described as the cultural, financial and media capital of the world, as well as the world's most economically powerful city. The next four most populous cities in the state are Buffalo, Rochester, Yonkers, and Syracuse, while the state capital is Albany.

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Hunter Mountain, as seen from Black Dome.

Hunter Mountain is located in the towns of Hunter and Lexington, just south of the village of Hunter, in Greene County, New York, USA. At approximately 4,040 feet (1,234 m) in elevation, it is the highest peak in the county and the second-highest peak in the Catskill Mountains.

While the mountain is closely associated with the highly popular eponymous ski area built around the Colonel's Chair ridge at the mountain's northwest corner, that takes up only a small portion of the mountain. The actual summit, some distance from the ski area, is graced with a fire lookout tower, the highest in the state and second-highest in the Northeast. The former road to it is open to hikers, horses (and possibly mountain bikers in the future). It is the most popular route to the mountain's summit. Hunter takes the shape of a medium-length ridge, rising steeply from Stony Clove Notch in the east, then gently to the summit in the center, and gently back down to the west where the land makes a much less steep drop into Taylor Hollow, the col between it and neighboring Rusk Mountain. As with its eastern neighbor Plateau Mountain, there is a considerable amount of level ground above 3,500 feet (1,067 m), the cutoff elevation for inclusion in the Catskill High Peaks.

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Mary Edwards Walker wearing her Medal of Honor

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A photograph of Grover Cleveland.

Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. Cleveland is the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). He was the winner of the popular vote for President three times—in 1884, 1888, and 1892—and was the only Democrat elected to the Presidency in the era of Republican political domination that lasted from 1860 to 1912. Cleveland's admirers praise him for his honesty, independence, integrity, and commitment to the principles of classical liberalism. As a leader of the Bourbon Democrats, he opposed imperialism, taxes, subsidies and inflationary policies, but as a reformer he also worked against corruption, patronage, and bossism.

Some of Cleveland's actions caused controversy even within his own party. His intervention in the Pullman Strike of 1894 in order to keep the railroads moving angered labor unions, and his support of the gold standard and opposition to free silver alienated the agrarian wing of the Democrats. Furthermore, critics complained that he had little imagination and seemed overwhelmed by the nation's economic disasters—depressions and strikes—in his second term.

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State facts

  • Total area: 54,555 mi2
    • Land: 47,190 mi2
    • Water: 7,365 mi2
  • Highest elevation: 5,344 ft (Mount Marcy)
  • Population 19,745,289 (2016 est)
  • Admission to the Union: July 26, 1788 (11th)

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The lift bridge in Fairport, New York

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The skyline of New York City.

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Henry Louis Mencken, a 20th century journalist and social critc.
"New York: A third-rate Babylon."

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Central Park, in New York City
Credit: Summ

Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres (3.41 km2); a rectangle 2.6 statute miles by 0.5 statute mile, or 4.1 km × 830 m) in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. With about twenty-five million visitors annually, Central Park is the most visited city park in The United States, and its appearance in many movies and television shows has made it famous.

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Politics: Conservative PartyIndependence PartyLiberal PartyLibertarian PartyManhattan Libertarian PartyNew York Republican State CommitteePolitical Party Strength in New YorkWorking Families PartyPolitics of Long IslandDemocratic CommitteeElectoral reform

Counties: AlbanyAlleganyBronxBroomeCattaraugusCayugaChautauquaChemungChenangoClintonColumbiaCortlandDelawareDutchessErieEssexFranklinFultonGeneseeGreeneHamiltonHerkimerJeffersonKingsLewisLivingstonMadisonMonroeMontgomeryNassauNew YorkNiagaraOneidaOnondagaOntarioOrangeOrleansOswegoOtsegoPutnamQueensRensselaerRichmondRocklandSaratogaSchenectadySchoharieSchuylerSenecaSt. LawrenceSteubenSuffolkSullivanTiogaTompkinsUlsterWarrenWashingtonWayneWestchesterWyomingYates

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Education in New York: Art Students League of New YorkBard College Conservatory of MusicCapital Region Independent Schools AssociationNew York State Education DepartmentGlobal History and Geography Regents ExamMathematics education in New YorkNew Visions for Public SchoolsUnited Nations International SchoolWhite Plains Public Schools

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