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Portal:New York (state)

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The New York State portal

Location of New York state in the United States

New York is a state in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern regions of the United States. It was one of the original thirteen colonies forming the United States. With a total area of 54,556 square miles (141,300 km2), New York is the 27th largest state; its population of more than 19 million people as of 2020 makes it the fourth most populous state in the U.S. The state is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south and Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont to the east; it has a maritime border with Rhode Island, east of Long Island, as well as an international border with the Canadian provinces of Quebec to the north and Ontario to the northwest. It is sometimes referred to as New York State to distinguish it from New York City, which is its largest city.

Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area. With an estimated population of 8.36 million in 2019, New York City is the most populous city in the United States and the premier gateway for immigration to the United States. The New York City metropolitan area is one of the most populous in the world. A global city, New York City is home to the United Nations Headquarters, and has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, as well as the world's most economically powerful city. The next four most populous cities in the state are Buffalo, Rochester, Yonkers, and Syracuse, while the state capital is Albany.

New York has a diverse geography. The southern part of the state is in the Atlantic coastal plain and includes Long Island and several smaller associated islands, as well as New York City and the lower Hudson River Valley. The large Upstate New York region comprises several ranges of the wider Appalachian Mountains, and the Adirondack Mountains in the northeastern lobe of the state. The north–south Hudson River Valley and the east–west Mohawk River Valley bisect these more mountainous regions. Western New York is considered part of the Great Lakes region and borders on Lake Ontario, Lake Erie, and Niagara Falls. The central part of the state is dominated by the Finger Lakes, a popular vacation and tourist destination. (Full article...)

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The Telluride House, formally the Cornell Branch of the Telluride Association (CBTA), and commonly referred to as just "Telluride", is a highly selective residential community of Cornell University students and faculty. Founded in 1910 by American industrialist L. L. Nunn, the house grants room and board scholarships to a number of undergraduate and graduate students, post-doctoral researchers and faculty members affiliated with the university's various colleges and programs. A fully residential intellectual society, the Telluride House takes as its pillars democratic self-governance, communal living and intellectual inquiry. Students granted the house's scholarship are known as Telluride Scholars.

The Telluride House is considered the first program of the educational non-profit Telluride Association, which was founded a year after the house was built and was first led by the Smithsonian Institution’s fourth Secretary Charles Doolittle Walcott. Nunn went on to found Deep Springs College in 1917. The Telluride Association founded and maintained other branches thereafter, two of which—at Cornell University and at the University of Michigan—are still active. The Association also runs free selective programs for high school students, including the Telluride Association Summer Program. (Full article...)

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David Alexander Paterson (born May 20, 1954) is an American politician and member of the Democratic Party who served as the 55th governor of New York, succeeding Eliot Spitzer and serving out nearly three years of Spitzer's term from March 2008 to the end of 2010. He is the first legally blind person to be sworn in as governor of a U.S. state, and is the first African American to serve as governor of New York.

Following his graduation from Hofstra Law School, Paterson worked in the District Attorney's office of Queens County, New York, and on the staff of Manhattan borough president David Dinkins. In 1985, he was elected to the New York State Senate to a seat once held by his father, former New York secretary of state Basil Paterson. In 2003, he rose to the position of Senate minority leader. Paterson was selected to be the running mate of Democratic gubernatorial nominee Eliot Spitzer in the 2006 New York gubernatorial election. Spitzer and Paterson were elected with 65% of the vote, and Paterson took office as lieutenant governor on January 1, 2007. (Full article...)

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The following are images from various New York state-related articles on Wikipedia.

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Skill is successfully walking a tightrope between the twin towers of New York's World Trade Center. Intelligence is not trying.

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Ethan Green Hawke (born November 6, 1970) is an American actor, writer, and director. He has been nominated for four Academy Awards and a Tony Award. Hawke has directed three feature films, three off-Broadway plays, and a documentary. He has also written three novels and one graphic novel. He made his film debut with the 1985 science fiction feature Explorers, before making a breakthrough appearance in the 1989 drama Dead Poets Society. He appeared in various films before taking a role in the 1994 Generation X drama Reality Bites, for which he received critical praise. Hawke starred alongside Julie Delpy in Richard Linklater's Before trilogy: Before Sunrise (1995), Before Sunset (2004) and Before Midnight (2013), all of which received critical acclaim.

Hawke has been nominated twice for both the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay and the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor; his writing contributions to Before Sunset and Before Midnight were recognized, as were his performances in Training Day (2001) and Boyhood (2014). Hawke was further honored with Screen Actors Guild Award nominations for both films, as well as British Academy Film Award and Golden Globe Award nominations for the latter. His other films include the science fiction drama Gattaca (1997), the contemporary adaptation of Hamlet (2000), the action thriller Assault on Precinct 13 (2005), Sidney Lumet's crime drama Before the Devil Knows You're Dead (2007), and the horror film Sinister (2012). In 2018, he garnered critical acclaim for his performance as a Protestant minister in Paul Schrader's drama First Reformed (2017), receiving numerous accolades, including the New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor, the Independent Spirit Award for Best Male Lead, and a nomination for the Critics' Choice Movie Award for Best Actor. (Full article...)

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Downing Park, in Newburgh, New York.
Credit: Daniel Case

Downing Park is the largest of several parks in the city of Newburgh, New York, United States. It was designed in the late 19th century by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, who gave the design to the city on the condition it would be named after their mentor, Andrew Jackson Downing, a Newburgh native who had died in a steamboat accident on the Hudson River in 1853. They delivered their plans to the city, which had acquired the land two years earlier, in 1889; the park was completed and opened in 1897. It was the last collaboration between the two.

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Tower number 16, preserved in Irvington
  • ...that the Yonkers Chiefs, a former Basketball team based in Yonkers, only played once during the 1946/47 season?
  • ...that the Croton Aqueduct was used as a water supply by several residents of Manhattan due to the lack of fresh water available on the island at the time?
  • ...that despite intentions to open the Crouse College, Syracuse University as a women-only college, his son opened it as open to both genders after his father, John Crouse, died during its construction?

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Brooklyn, birthplace of Henry Gross.

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View of Troy (specifically Lansingburgh) from Oakwood Cemetery
Credit: UpstateNYer

Troy is a city on the east bank of the Hudson River located a few miles north of the capital, Albany. Settled in 1707, Troy was incorporated as a village in 1787, as a town in 1791, and finally as a city in 1816. This photo is of Lansingburgh, an area of North Troy, which was founded as a separate town, but incorporated into the city of Troy in 1900. Troy is known as the "Collar City" for being a manufacturing center for shirts, shirtwaists, collars, and cuffs in the late 1800s. This photo is taken from Oakwood Cemetery, burial place of Sam Wilson, the origin of Uncle Sam.

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State facts

  • Total area: 54,555 mi2
    • Land: 47,190 mi2
    • Water: 7,365 mi2
  • Highest elevation: 5,344 ft (Mount Marcy)
  • Population 19,745,289 (2016 est)
  • Admission to the Union: July 26, 1788 (11th)

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