Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture

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Usage[edit]

  1. Add a new selected picture to the next available subpage.
  2. Update "max=" to new total for its {{Random portal component}} on the main page.

Selected picture[edit]

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/1
The Scream.jpg
The Scream (Skrik, 1893), by expressionist painter Edvard Munch. A well known artistic representation of angst
image credit: public domain (US)

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/2
Zyprexa-Zydis JPN.jpg
Zyprexa® Zydis® 10mg tablets, as available in Japan. Drug name: Olanzapine
image credit: PHENTANYL

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/3
advert for thorazine. The text in the ad reads: When the patient lashes out against "them" - THORAZINE (brand of chlorpromazine) quickly puts an end to his violent outburst. 'Thorazine' is especially effective when the psychotic episode is triggered by delusions or hallucinations. At the outset of treatment, Thorazine's combination of antipsychotic and sedative effects provides both emotional and physical calming. Assaultive or destructive behavior is rapidly controlled. As therapy continues, the initial sedative effect gradually disappears. But the antipsychotic effect continues, helping to dispel or modify delusions, hallucinations and confusion, while keeping the patient calm and approachable. SMITH KLINE AND FRENCH LABORATORIES leaders in psychopharmaceutical research.
Advert from ca. 1962 for Thorazine (trade-name of chlorpromazine in the U.S.). An antipsychotic (neuroleptic, major tranquilizer, antischizophrenic, actaractic). In Europe it is known as Largactil. The text of the ad reads:

When the patient lashes out against "them" - THORAZINE (brand of chlorpromazine) quickly puts an end to his violent outburst. 'Thorazine' is especially effective when the psychotic episode is triggered by delusions or hallucinations. At the outset of treatment, Thorazine's combination of antipsychotic and sedative effects provides both emotional and physical calming. Assaultive or destructive behavior is rapidly controlled. As therapy continues, the initial sedative effect gradually disappears. But the antipsychotic effect continues, helping to dispel or modify delusions, hallucinations and confusion, while keeping the patient calm and approachable. SMITH KLINE AND FRENCH LABORATORIES leaders in psychopharmaceutical research.

image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/4
CGJung.jpg
Carl Jung, Swiss psychiatrist and psychotherapist, founder of analytical psychology
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/5
Leucotome, a tool for performing leucotomies (lobotomies), circa 1942, United Kingdom
Advertisement for a leucotome, a tool for performing leucotomies (lobotomies) (UK, circa 1942)
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/6
Risperidone (trade name Risperdal), an atypical antipsychotic medication.
Risperidone (trade name Risperdal), an atypical antipsychotic medication.
image credit: Housed

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/7
Adolf Wölfli 005.jpg
Work by Adolf Wölfli, an outsider artist and patient at a Swiss psychiatric hospital
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/8
Mignon Nevada Ophelia2.jpg
Mignon Nevada as William Shakespeare's character Ophelia, circa 1910. An artistic representation of insanity leading to suicide
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/9
Gottfried Franz - Munchhausen Underwater.jpg
Baron Münchhausen in a fabulated environment, by Gottfried Franz (circa 1896). The character after which Münchausen syndrome is named.
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/10
Occupational therapy. Toy making in a psychiatric hospital. World War 1 era
Occupational therapy. Toy making in a psychiatric hospital. World War 1 era
image credit: Otis Historical Archives National Museum of Health and Medicine

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/11
Shellshock2.jpg
Australian soldiers near Ypres in 1917, during World War I. Soldier on left is likely suffering from shellshock, now described as Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/12
PhrenologyPix.jpg
A human skull mapped according to phrenology (1883), early precursor to modern psychiatry and neuroscience, now considered a pseudoscience
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/13
Artistic view of how the world feels like with schizophrenia - journal.pmed.0020146.g001.jpg
Schizophrenia/Internal Symmetry, by Craig Finn, artwork by a person experiencing schizophrenia
image credit: Craig Finn/PLOS

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/14
Windows of a person showing symptoms of paranoia and persecutory delusions, symptoms of schizophrenia
Windows of a person showing symptoms of paranoia and persecutory delusions, symptoms of schizophrenia
image credit: Schizophrenic window

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/15
Vincent van Gogh - Corridor in the Asylum.JPG
Corridor in the Asylum, by Vincent van Gogh, painted during his voluntary hospitalization for symptoms of mental illness
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/16
Louis wain cats.png
Cat portraits showing increased abstraction, by Louis Wain, who, while an inmate at a mental hospital, may not have painted them in this order, thus the question of whether they document a deterioration in condition remains unanswered. It is also not certain if he suffered from schizophrenia, though the images have been used extensively as examples of schizophrenic outsider art.
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/17
William Hogarth 019.jpg
Illustration from A Rake's Progress, by William Hogarth (circa 1730s), showing Bethlem Royal Hospital, (origin of the word bedlam)
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/18
Bellevue Hospital front gate jeh.jpg
Bellevue Hospital front gate, New York City
image credit: Jim.henderson

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/19
Philippe Pinel à la Salpêtrière.jpg
French psychiatrist Philippe Pinel (1745-1826) releasing people from their chains at the Salpêtrière asylum in Paris in 1795 (painting by Tony Robert-Fleury)
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/20
County Insane Asylum, Milwaukee
County insane asylum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (prior to 1881)
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/21
Daniel McNaughton, Insane Murderer, in Illus. Lond. News. Wellcome L0000720.jpg
Mentally ill Scottish murderer Daniel M'Naghten, namesake of the M'Naghten rules
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/22
Interior of an asylum for the mentally ill, with few people, large tables and paintings on the walls
Waterford District Lunatic Asylum on John's Hill in Waterford. Now known as St. Otteran's. (circa 1880s)
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/23
Privatklinik Wyss Prospekt 1930er.jpg
Poster for a psychiatric hospital in Switzerland (1930)
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/24
The Burghölzli psychiatric clinic in Switzerland (1880s)
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/25
Jung 1910-rotated.jpg
Carl Jung in front of the Burghölzli psychiatric hospital, Switzerland
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/26
Klinikgebäude Münsingen, a cultural property of national significance in Switzerland
image credit: Zueöavp

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/27
Bergonic chair.jpg
A demonstration of electroconvulsive therapy (circa World War I)
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/28
Melencolia I, a 1514 woodcut by Albrecht Dürer, an allegory of melancholia
image credit: public domain

Portal:Psychiatry/Selected picture/29
Pelvicdouche.jpg
High pressure hydrotherapy, to generate orgasm, as formerly used to treat female hysteria, a now obsolete gender specific disorder
image credit: public domain

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