Portal:Serbia

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A česnica (Serbian Cyrillic: чесница, Serbian pronunciation: [tʃěːsnit͜sa]; derived from the noun čest, meaning "share"), also called Božićna pogača (Serbian Cyrillic: Божићна погача, "Christmas pogača") is the ceremonial, round loaf of bread that is an indispensable part of Christmas dinner in Serbian tradition. The preparation of this bread may be accompanied by various rules and rituals. A coin is often put into the dough during the kneading; other small objects may also be inserted. At the beginning of Christmas dinner, the česnica is rotated three times counterclockwise, before being broken among the family members. The person who finds the coin in his piece of the bread will supposedly be exceptionally lucky in the coming year. The česnica was used in folk magic for divining or influencing the amount of crops.


Selected picture

Golubac fortress overlooking the Danube river
Credit: Denis Barthel

Golubac Fortress (Serbian: Голубачки град or Golubački grad, Hungarian: Galambóc vára) was a medieval fortified town on the right side of the Danube River, 4 kilometers downstream from the modern-day town of Golubac, Serbia.

Did you know...

  • ... that the work of physician Elizabeth Ross is still commemorated annually in Serbia despite her having spent only three weeks in the country?
  • ... that Višeslav was the first Serbian ruler known by name?
  • ... that the association footballer Harry Beadles was awarded the Serbian gold medal for bravery during World War I?
  • ... that although Fehmi Agani worked for reconciliation between Serbs and Albanians, his murder during the Kosovo War has been attributed to Serbian security forces?
  • ... that the victims of the Kragujevac massacre in Serbia included 144 high school students?
  • ... that Leslie Joy Whitehead, a Canadian woman, enlisted in the Serbian Army as a man so that she might get closer to the front lines in World War I?

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Demographics

Population statistics of Serbia (2011 census)
  • Serbia 7,186,862
    • Belgrade region 1,659,440
    • Vojvodina region 1,931,809
    • Šumadija and West Serbia region 2,031,697
    • South and East Serbia region 1,563,916
    • Kosovo and Metohija n/a

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  • undertaking project maintenance – help adding project templates to article and category talk pages – see templates page
    • identifying relevant articles and add {{WikiProject Serbia}} to their talk page.
    • assessing articles for quality and assessment standards – see the assessment page.
    • assessing and recommending resources (online and print) – see the resources page.
  • contributing to the Serbia portal – see the Serbia portal
  • communicating with project members – at the project talk page
  • add missing images – see also Category:Wikipedia requested photographs in Serbia
  • inviting potential members – add {{WPSRB Invite}} to their talk pages.

Selected biography


Vuk Karadžić
Vuk Stefanović Karadžić (pronounced [ʋûːk stefǎːnoʋitɕ kâradʒitɕ], Serbian Cyrillic: Вук Стефановић Караџић; 7 November 1787 – 7 February 1864) was a Serbian philologist and linguist who was the major reformer of the Serbian language. He deserves, perhaps, for his collections of songs, fairy tales, and riddles, to be called the father of the study of Serbian folklore. He was also the author of the first Serbian dictionary in the new reformed language. In addition, he translated the New Testament into the reformed form of the Serbian spelling and language.

Karadžić held the view that all South Slavs that speak the Shtokavian dialect were Serbs or of Serbian origin and considered all of them to speak the Serbian language. This view is today a matter of dispute among scientists.


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Category:Serbian saints of the Eastern Orthodox Church

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Largest cities of Serbia (2011 census)

Belgrade - 1,731,425
Novi Sad - 335,701
Niš - 257,867
Priština- 198,000
Prizren - 178,000
Kragujevac - 177,468
Leskovac - 143,962
Subotica - 140,358
Kruševac - 127,429
Kraljevo - 124,554
Zrenjanin - 122,714
Pančevo - 122,252
Šabac - 115,347
Čačak - 114,809
Uroševac - 108,000
Smederevo - 107,528
Sombor - 97,263
Valjevo - 95,631
Peć -95,000

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