Portal:Trains/Selected article

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Purge server cache

Nominations[edit]

To nominate an article to become the Trains Portal selected article, follow the directions at Portal:Trains/Selected article candidates.

Archive[edit]

Today, May 24, 2017, is in week number 21.

Older archives: 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005



Week 52, 2016
December 25, 2016 - January 1, 2017
First Great Western power car 43172 leads an eastbound HST service through Patchway in 2011

Patchway railway station (station code PWY) is on the South Wales Main Line, 6 miles (10 km) from Bristol Temple Meads, serving the Bristol suburbs of Patchway and Stoke Gifford in South Gloucestershire, England. As of 2015 it is managed by Great Western Railway, which is the third franchise to be responsible for the station since privatisation in 1997. They provide all train services at the station, mainly a train every hour in each direction between Cardiff Central and Taunton. The station was opened by the Bristol and South Wales Union Railway in 1863 with a single platform, 0.5 miles (0.8 km) west of the current location, but was resited in 1885 when the line was widened to double track. The station once had large buildings and a goods yard which were demolished in the late 20th century, with small brick shelters built in their place. The line through Patchway is due to be electrified as part of the 21st-century modernisation of the Great Western Main Line.

Recently selected: British Rail Class 86 - Othello station - North Philadelphia station


Week 1
January 2 - January 8
The right-of-way and platforms at the former Pill station location in 2015

Pill railway station was a railway station on the Portishead Branch Line, 7.8 miles (12.6 km) west of Bristol Temple Meads, serving the village of Pill in North Somerset, England. The station was opened by the Bristol and Portishead Pier and Railway Company on 18 April 1867. It had two platforms, on either side of a passing loop, with a goods yard and signal box later additions. Services increased until the 1930s, at which point a half-hourly service operated. However the Portishead Branch was recommended for closure by the Beeching report, and the station was closed on 7 September 1964, although the line saw freight traffic until 1981. Regular freight trains through the station began to run again in 2002 when Royal Portbury Dock was connected to the rail network. The station is due to be reopened to passenger traffic in 2019 as part of MetroWest, a scheme to increase rail services in the Bristol area. The new station will have a single platform, an accessible footbridge and a car park, with trains running between Portishead and Bristol.

Recently selected: Patchway railway station - British Rail Class 86 - Othello station


Week 2
January 9 - January 15
An MBTA Commuter Rail train arrives at Porter station in 2007

Porter is an MBTA transfer station serving the rapid transit Red Line and the commuter rail Fitchburg Line, located at Porter Square in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Positioned at the intersection of Massachusetts and Somerville Avenues, the station provides rapid transit access to northern Cambridge and the western portions of Somerville. A series of commuter rail depots have been located at Porter Square under various names since the 1840s. The modern station with both subway and commuter rail levels was designed by Cambridge Seven Associates and opened on December 8, 1984. At 105 feet (32 m) below ground, the subway section is the deepest station on the MBTA system. The station originally had six artworks installed as part of the Arts on the Line program; five remain, including Gift of the Wind and Glove Cycle.

Recently selected: Pill railway station - Patchway railway station - British Rail Class 86


Week 3
January 16 - January 22
Tracks exiting the Saverne Tunnel's west portal in March 2016

The Saverne Tunnel (French: Tunnel de Saverne), also known as the Ernolsheim-lès-Saverne Tunnel (French: Tunnel d'Ernolsheim-lès-Saverne), is a twin-bore, high-speed rail tunnel in western Bas-Rhin, France. It carries the LGV Est line of France's TGV high-speed rail network through the narrowest part of the Vosges mountain range, beneath Mont Saint-Michel and adjacent to the Saverne Pass. The tunnel consists of two bores, containing one railroad track each, that are connected by passageways every 500 metres (1,600 ft). The LGV Est crosses the 270 m (890 ft) Haspelbaechel viaduct near the western end of the tunnel. The tunnel was excavated by a tunnel boring machine between November 2011 and February 2013. Civil engineering work on the tunnel ended in April 2014 and it opened with the rest of the second phase of the LGV Est on 3 July 2016. The total cost of the tunnel was approximately €200 million.

Recently selected: Porter (MBTA station) - Pill railway station - Patchway railway station


Week 4
January 23 - January 29
Westbound Shore Line East train arrives at Guilford

Shore Line East (SLE) is a commuter rail service which operates along the Northeast Corridor through southern Connecticut, US. A fully owned subsidiary of the Connecticut Department of Transportation (ConnDOT), SLE provides service seven days a week along the Northeast Corridor from New London west to New Haven, with limited through service to Bridgeport and Stamford. Connecting service west of New Haven to New York City is available via Metro-North Railroad's New Haven Line. The service was introduced in 1990 as a temporary measure to reduce congestion during construction work on I-95. However, it proved more popular than expected, and service was continued after construction ended despite criticisms that the line was too expensive to operate. The service has been continually upgraded since its inception with rebuilt stations and new rolling stock as well as extensions to New London in 1996 and to Stamford in 2001. Around 1,900 to 2,100 riders use the service every weekday depending on the season.

Recently selected: Saverne Tunnel - Porter (MBTA station) - Pill railway station


Week 5
January 30 - February 5
1939 subway map showing the proposed Staten Island Tunnel

The Staten Island Tunnel is an abandoned, incomplete railway/subway tunnel in New York City. It was intended to connect railways on Staten Island (precursors to the modern-day Staten Island Railway) to the BMT Fourth Avenue Line of the New York City Subway, in Brooklyn, via a new crossing under the Narrows. Planned to extend 10,400 feet (3,200 m), the tunnel would have been among the world's longest at the time of its planning. Construction began in 1923, and the tunnel was excavated 150 feet (46 m) into the Narrows before New York City Mayor John Hylan, a former Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT) employee and initial proponent of the tunnel, canceled the project in 1925. The tunnel lies dormant under Owl's Head Park in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. Later proposals to complete the tunnel, including the 1939 plans for the Independent Subway System's ambitious Second System, were never funded. Modern proposals for completion of the tunnel have come from New York City Councilman Lewis Fidler, who has proposed 0.33% tax for the tri-state region to pay for the construction. The tunnel was listed as one of many projects that could receive federal funds that were to have been allocated to the Access to the Region's Core tunnel, which was canceled in October 2010. State Senator Diane Savino was among the supporters of the tunnel; Savino stated that if built, the tunnel would cost $3 billion and would improve quality of life for Staten Islanders, reduce traffic, and increase the attractiveness of the borough for investment.

Recently selected: Shore Line East - Saverne Tunnel - Porter (MBTA station)


Week 6
February 6 - February 12
The Lilly Belle locomotive of the WDWRR shortly after its return to service in 2016

The Walt Disney World Railroad (WDWRR) is a 3 ft (914 mm) narrow gauge heritage railroad and attraction in the Walt Disney World Resort's Magic Kingdom theme park in Bay Lake, Florida, in the United States. Its route is 1.5 miles (2.4 km) in length and encircles the vast majority of the park, with stations in the Main Street, U.S.A., Frontierland, and Fantasyland sections. The rail line, which was built by Retlaw Enterprises (now Walt Disney Imagineering), is operated with four historic steam locomotives originally built by Baldwin Locomotive Works. Each of the four locomotives pulls a set of five passenger cars with seating capacity for 75 passengers per car, for a total of 375 passengers per train. The Walt Disney World Railroad opened to the public for the first time on October 1, 1971, the same day that the Magic Kingdom park first opened. Since then the WDWRR has become one of the world's most popular steam-powered railroads, with 3.7 million passengers served each year.

Recently selected: Staten Island Tunnel - Shore Line East - Saverne Tunnel


Week 7
February 13 - February 19
Forest Hills bound platform at Woodhaven Boulevard in 2015

Woodhaven Boulevard is a local station on the IND Queens Boulevard Line of the New York City Subway, consisting of four tracks. Located in the Elmhurst neighborhood of Queens, it is served by the R train at all times except nights, when the E train takes over service. The M train provides additional service here on weekdays except nights. The station serves the adjacent Queens Center Mall, as well as numerous bus lines. Woodhaven Boulevard was opened on December 31, 1936, as Woodhaven Boulevard–Slattery Plaza. At the time, the station was part of the Independent Subway System. The plaza was demolished in the 1950s, but the name tablets displaying the station's original name were kept. In the 1980s, the Woodhaven Boulevard station was renamed after Queens Center, an adjacent shopping mall. The station was renovated in the 1990s after years of deterioration.

Recently selected: Walt Disney World Railroad - Staten Island Tunnel - Shore Line East


Week 8
February 20 - February 26
The diamond crossover to the north of the platforms at Hudson Yards station in 2015

34th Street–Hudson Yards is a New York City Subway station in Manhattan's West Side on the IRT Flushing Line, and is the western (railroad south) terminus for the 7 local and <7> express services. It has two tracks and one island platform, with two levels of mezzanines: one directly above the platform and the other directly below street level. The station, originally part of the city's bid for the 2012 Summer Olympics and the failed attempt to build the West Side Stadium, was first scheduled to open in summer 2012. After a series of delays involving escalator, elevator, and fire and safety systems, the station finally opened on September 13, 2015. The 34th Street station is the first completely new station in the New York City Subway system since 1989, as well as the first such station funded by the government of New York City since 1950. The new construction, part of the city's and the MTA's master plan for the Far West Side, extended the IRT Flushing Line west from Times Square to Eleventh Avenue, then south to 34th Street. Although the West Side Stadium plan was rejected by city and state planning agencies, the 7 Subway Extension plan received approval to move ahead, as New York political leaders wanted to see the warehouse district west of Eighth Avenue and north of 34th Street redeveloped as part of the Hudson Yards Redevelopment Project, and subway service was to be an essential part of that effort. The extension also serves the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, which was expanded in 2008–2014 and is located a block away from the station entrances.

Recently selected: Woodhaven Boulevard (IND Queens Boulevard Line) - Walt Disney World Railroad - Staten Island Tunnel


Week 9
February 27 - March 5
One of the 5000 Class Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway freight locomotives in New Mexico in 1943

Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, a 2-10-4 locomotive has two leading wheels on one axle, usually in a bissel truck, ten coupled driving wheels on five axles, and four trailing wheels on two axles, usually in a bogie. These were referred to as the Texas type in most of the United States, the Colorado type on the Burlington Route and the Selkirk type in Canada.

Recently selected: 34th Street–Hudson Yards (IRT Flushing Line) - Woodhaven Boulevard (IND Queens Boulevard Line) - Walt Disney World Railroad


Week 10
March 6 - March 12
An InterCity 225 passes the memorial garden created next to the East Coast Main Line for the four people who died in the Hatfield rail crash

The Hatfield rail crash was a railway accident on 17 October 2000, at Hatfield, Hertfordshire, UK. It was caused by a metal fatigue induced derailment, killing four people and injuring more than 70. Though the accident did not result in a large number of deaths, it exposed major stewardship shortcomings of the privatised national railway infrastructure company Railtrack. Reports found there was a lack of communication and some staff were not aware of maintenance procedures. Railtrack subsequently went into administration and was replaced by Network Rail. The aftermath of the accident saw widespread speed limit reductions throughout the rail network and a tightening of health and safety procedures, the repercussions of which were still felt up to 15 years later. In 2005, both Network Rail and the contractor Balfour Beatty were found guilty of breaching health and safety laws.

Recently selected: 2-10-4 - 34th Street–Hudson Yards (IRT Flushing Line) - Woodhaven Boulevard (IND Queens Boulevard Line)


Week 11
March 13 - March 19
An M train at the Jackson Heights/Roosevelt Avenue station in 2014

The IND Queens Boulevard Line is a line of the B Division of the New York City Subway in Manhattan and Queens, New York City, United States. The line, which is underground throughout its entire route, contains 23 stations. The core section between 50th Street in Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan, and 169th Street in Jamaica, Queens, was built by the Independent Subway System (IND) in stages between 1933 and 1940, with the Jamaica–179th Street terminus opening in 1950. The line's construction promoted housing growth along the Queens Boulevard corridor and stimulated the urbanization of central Queens, and there are multiple provisions for spur routes along the Queens Boulevard line that were never built. As of 2015, it is among the system's busiest lines, with a weekday ridership of over 460,000 people.

Recently selected: Hatfield rail crash - 2-10-4 - 34th Street–Hudson Yards (IRT Flushing Line)


Week 12
March 20 - March 26
The platforms and trainshed at Liverpool Street station in 2007

Liverpool Street station, also known as London Liverpool Street, is a central London railway terminus and connected London Underground station in the north-eastern corner of the City of London, in the ward of Bishopsgate. It is one of the busiest railway stations in London, serving as the terminus of the West Anglia Main Line to Cambridge, the busier Great Eastern Main Line to Norwich, local and regional commuter trains serving east London and destinations in the East of England, and the Stansted Express service to Stansted Airport. The station opened in 1874 as a replacement for Bishopsgate station as the Great Eastern Railway's main London terminus. By 1895 it had the largest number of platforms on any terminal railway station in London. Liverpool Street was built as a dual-level station with provision for the Underground. A tube station opened in 1875 for the Metropolitan Railway, and the station today is served by the Central, Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines, and is in fare zone 1.

Recently selected: IND Queens Boulevard Line - Hatfield rail crash - 2-10-4


Week 13
March 27 - April 2
Trains at Rye station in 2009

The Marshlink line is a railway line in South East England. It runs from Ashford, Kent via Romney Marsh, Rye and the Ore Tunnel to Hastings, connecting to the East Coastway Line towards Brighton. The line was constructed by the South Eastern Railway, settling a rivalry with the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway that led to disputes over the route and planning. It opened in 1851 after several false starts, followed by branch lines to Rye Harbour in 1854, Dungeness in 1881 and New Romney in 1884. The line struggled to be profitable and it seemed likely that it would close following the Beeching Report. All the branch lines were closed by 1967 but the main line was kept open because of poor road connections in the area. Services are currently being provided by Southern. The Marshlink line is one of the few in South East England that has not been electrified, and uses the British Rail Class 171 diesel rolling stock. Despite its relative unimportance in the national rail network, it is now considered politically significant as electrification of the line could allow High Speed 1 to be extended to Hastings and Eastbourne.

Recently selected: Liverpool Street station - IND Queens Boulevard Line - Hatfield rail crash


Week 14
April 3 - April 9
Erie Union Station main building in 2015

Union Station is an Amtrak railroad station and mixed-use commercial building in downtown Erie, in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The Lake Shore Limited provides passenger service between Chicago, New York City, and Boston; Erie is the train's only stop in Pennsylvania. The station's ground floor has been redeveloped into commercial spaces with offices in the remainder of the building. The first railroad station in Erie was established in 1851 but was replaced with the Romanesque Revival-style Union Depot in 1866. Through a series of mergers and acquisitions by competing railroad companies which started not long after the establishment of Erie's first railroads, Union Depot became jointly owned and operated by the New York Central and Pennsylvania railroads. To meet the changing needs of the rapidly growing city, planners designed a more modern structure to replace the original depot. The new Art Deco Union Station, dedicated on December 3, 1927, was the first railroad station of that style in the United States. Passenger rail service dwindled after World War II when air and highway travel became more popular. The New York Central and Pennsylvania Railroad were merged in 1968 to form Penn Central, and passenger rail was transferred from Penn Central to Amtrak in 1971. With reduced demand for train travel, Union Station was neglected and allowed to decay until Logistics Plus bought it in 2003. Since then it has been restored, with portions re-purposed as commercial and retail space.

Recently selected: Marshlink line - Liverpool Street station - IND Queens Boulevard Line


Week 15
April 10 - April 16
Manhattan bound platform with Metropolitan Avenue bound M at the station in 2015

Grand Avenue–Newtown is a local station on the IND Queens Boulevard Line of the New York City Subway. Located under private property at the northeast corner of the intersection of Grand Avenue, Broadway, and Queens Boulevard in the neighborhood of Elmhurst, Queens, it is served by the R train at all times except nights, when the E train takes over service. The M train provides additional service here on weekdays except nights.

Recently selected: Union Station (Erie, Pennsylvania) - Marshlink line - Liverpool Street station


Week 16
April 17 - April 23
Trains at King's Cross platforms 4-7 in 2009

King's Cross railway station, also known as London King's Cross, is a Central London railway terminus on the northern edge of the city. It is one of the busiest railway stations in the United Kingdom, being the southern terminus of the East Coast Main Line to North East England and Scotland. The station was opened in 1852 by the Great Northern Railway It quickly grew and was expanded several times in the 19th century. It came under ownership of the London and North Eastern Railway as part of the Big Four grouping in 1923, who introduced famous services such as the Flying Scotsman and locomotives such as Mallard. The station complex was redeveloped in the 1970s, simplifying the layout and providing electric suburban services, and it became a major terminus for the high-speed InterCity 125. As of 2017, long-distance trains from King's Cross are run by Virgin Trains East Coast to Edinburgh Waverley and Glasgow Central via York and Newcastle; other long-distance operators include Hull Trains and Grand Central. In addition, Great Northern runs suburban commuter trains in and around north London. The station became well known for its association with the Harry Potter books and films, particularly the fictional Platform 9¾. Adjacent to King's Cross station is St. Pancras International, the London terminus for Eurostar services to continental Europe. Beneath both main line stations is King's Cross St. Pancras tube station on the London Underground, and combined they form one of the country's largest transport hubs.

Recently selected: Grand Avenue–Newtown (IND Queens Boulevard Line) - Union Station (Erie, Pennsylvania) - Marshlink line


Week 17
April 24 - April 30
The trainshed at Marylebone station in 2012

Marylebone station is a Central London railway terminus and connected London Underground station in the Marylebone area of the City of Westminster. On the National Rail network it is also known as London Marylebone and is the southern terminus of the Chiltern Main Line to Birmingham. On the Underground it is on the Bakerloo line between Edgware Road and Baker Street. The station opened in 1899 as the London terminus of the Great Central Main Line (GCML), the last major railway to open in Britain in over 100 years, linking the capital to the cities of Nottingham, Sheffield and Manchester. Marylebone was the last of London's main line termini to be built, and is one of the smallest, having opened with half the number of platforms originally planned. Marylebone station suffered from a lack of traffic and after the GCML closed in 1966, it gradually declined in use. By the 1980s, it was threatened with closure, but was reprieved due to continued commuter traffic on the London to Aylesbury Line (a remaining part of the GCML) and from High Wycombe. In 1994 the station found a new role as the terminus of the Chiltern Main Line. Following the privatisation of British Rail, the station was expanded with two additional platforms in 2006 and improved services to Birmingham Snow Hill. In 2015 services began between Marylebone and Oxford Parkway via a new chord connecting the main line to the Oxford to Bicester Line, with an extension to Oxford following in 2016.

Recently selected: London King's Cross railway station - Grand Avenue–Newtown (IND Queens Boulevard Line) - Union Station (Erie, Pennsylvania)


Week 18
May 1 - May 7
The Manhattan-bound platform of Jamaica-179th Street station in 2015

Jamaica–179th Street is an express terminal station on the IND Queens Boulevard Line of the New York City Subway. Located under Hillside Avenue at 179th Street in the Jamaica neighborhood of Queens, it is served by the F train at all times, with a few rush-hour E trains also terminating here. The station has 15 entrances, including two at Midland Parkway in Jamaica Estates. Jamaica–179th Street was opened on December 11, 1950, although it had been planned to be built at 178th Street as early as 1928. At the time, the Queens Boulevard Line was part of the Independent Subway System (IND), but the original IND plans did not provide for constructing the 178th Street station until the line was extended even further to Queens Village. The line opened to 169th Street, the next station south, in 1937. Various changes in plans, as well as material shortages due to the Great Depression and World War II, delayed the project until 1946. Jamaica–179th Street became among Queens' busiest upon its 1950 opening. After a period of deterioration, the station was renovated twice, in the 1980s and the 2000s. As a result of planning for a never-built expansion to Queens Village, the station has 8 storage tracks to its east, giving it the highest peak capacity of any New York City Subway station.

Recently selected: Marylebone station - London King's Cross railway station - Grand Avenue–Newtown (IND Queens Boulevard Line)


Week 19
May 8 - May 14
The abandoned North Shore Branch in 2010

The North Shore Branch is an abandoned branch of the Staten Island Railway in New York City, which operated along Staten Island's North Shore from Saint George to Port Ivory. The line continues into New Jersey via the Arthur Kill Vertical Lift Bridge to Cranford Junction. The line started construction in 1884, and rapid transit service on the line started on February 23, 1886. Passenger service ended on March 31, 1953, and freight service ended by 1989. In 2005, freight service on the western portion of the line was reactivated, and there are proposals to reactivate the former passenger line for rail or bus service.

Recently selected: Jamaica–179th Street (IND Queens Boulevard Line) - Marylebone station - London King's Cross railway station


Week 20
May 15 - May 21
The station exterior in 2016

Tukwila International Boulevard is a light rail station located in Tukwila, Washington. It is situated between the SeaTac/Airport and Rainier Beach stations on the Central Link line, which runs from Seattle–Tacoma International Airport to Downtown Seattle as part of the Link light rail system. The station consists of two elevated side platforms enclosed in a structure northeast of the interchange of State Route 99 and State Route 518 in Tukwila, Washington. It also includes 662 total parking spaces and functions as a park and ride, one of only two on the line. Tukwila International Boulevard station opened on July 18, 2009, on the first day of Central Link service, and served as the line's terminus until SeaTac/Airport station opened in December 2009. Trains serve the station 20 hours a day on most days; the headway between trains is 6 minutes during peak periods, with less frequent service at other times. Tukwila International Boulevard station is also served by two RapidRide lines and two King County Metro bus routes that connect it to Downtown Seattle, Federal Way, Burien, Renton, Georgetown, and West Seattle.

Recently selected: North Shore Branch - Jamaica–179th Street (IND Queens Boulevard Line) - Marylebone station


Week 21
May 22 - May 28
The first train to serve Wachusett station in September 2016

Wachusett is a commuter rail station on the MBTA Commuter Rail Fitchburg Line. It is northwest of the intersection of Massachusetts Route 2 and Route 31 in Fitchburg, Massachusetts. It serves as the northwestern terminus for Fitchburg Line trains. The opening of Wachusett extended service 4.5 miles (7.2 km) west from Fitchburg on the Pan Am Southern main line, lengthening the Fitchburg Line to 54 miles (87 km). The station is expected to draw 400 daily riders. After years of planning and discussion, work on the station began with site preparation in December 2012. Construction began in mid-2013. The station opened for limited weekday service on September 30, 2016, to satisfy the terms of the federal grant that funded it; full service began on November 21, 2016. At 54 miles (87 km) from North Station, Wachusett is the outermost MBTA station in Massachusetts; only Wickford Junction in Rhode Island is further from Boston.

Recently selected: Tukwila International Boulevard station - North Shore Branch - Jamaica–179th Street (IND Queens Boulevard Line)


Week 22
May 29 - June 4
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: Wachusett (MBTA station) - Tukwila International Boulevard station - North Shore Branch


Week 23
June 5 - June 11
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - Wachusett (MBTA station) - Tukwila International Boulevard station


Week 24
June 13 - June 18
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - - Wachusett (MBTA station)


Week 25
June 19 - June 25
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 26
June 26 - July 2
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 27
July 3 - July 9
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 28
July 10 - July 16
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 29
July 17 - July 23
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 30
July 24 - July 30
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 31
July 31 - August 6
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 32
August 7 - August 13
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 33
August 14 - August 20
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 34
August 21 - August 27
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 35
August 28 - September 3
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 36
September 4 - September 10
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 37
September 11 - September 17
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 38
September 18 - September 24
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 39
September 25 - October 1
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 40
October 2 - October 8
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 41
October 9 - October 15
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 42
October 16 - October 22
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 43
October 23 - October 29
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 44
October 30 - November 5
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 45
November 6 - November 12
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 46
November 13 - November 19
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 47
November 20 - November 26
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 48
November 27 - December 3
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 49
December 4 - December 10
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 50
December 11 - December 17
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 51
December 18 - December 24
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -


Week 52
December 25 - December 31
The selected article has not yet been chosen for this week

Recently selected: - -