Portal:Women's sport

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The Women's Sport Portal
This is a sister portal of the Sport Portal and Feminism Portal

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Women get set to run for an awareness event in Netherlands, 2014

Women's sports includes amateur as well as women's professional sports, in all varieties of sports. Female participation and popularity in sports increased dramatically in the twentieth century, especially in the last quarter-century, reflecting changes in modern societies that emphasized gender parity. Although the level of participation and performance still varies greatly by country and by sport, women's sports are widely accepted throughout the world today. In a few instances, such as figure skating, female athletes rival or exceed their male counterparts in popularity. In many sports women usually do not compete on equal terms against men.

Although there has been a rise in participation by women in sports, a large disparity still remains. These disparities are prevalent globally and continue to hinder equality in sports. Many institutions and programs still remain conservative and do not contribute to gender equity in sports.

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  • ... there are over 600 roller derby leagues and the sport is played in over 20 countries?


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Canadian Hayley Wickenheiser is the all-time leading scorer in the women's tournament and was named tournament MVP twice.

At the 99th IOC Session in July 1992, the IOC voted to approve women's hockey as an Olympic event beginning with the 1998 Winter Olympics as part of their effort to increase the number of female athletes at the Olympics. Women's hockey had not been in the programme when Nagano, Japan had won the right to host the Olympics, and the decision required approval by the Nagano Winter Olympic Organizing Committee (NWOOC). The NWOOC was initially hesitant to include the event because of the additional costs of staging the tournament and because they felt their team, which had failed to qualify for that year's World Championships, could not be competitive. According to Glynis Peters, the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association's (CAHA) head of female hockey, "the Japanese would have to finance an entirely new sports operation to bring their team up to Olympic standards in six years, which they were also really reluctant to do." Part of the agreement was that the tournament would be limited to six teams, and no additional facilities would be built. The CAHA also agreed to help build and train the Japanese team so that it could be more competitive. The IOC had agreed that if the NWOOC had not approved the event, it would be held at the 2002 Winter Olympics. The format of the first tournament was similar to the men's: preliminary round-robin games followed by a medal round playoff.

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EAGL became a reality on July 31, 1995, when eight universities banded together to form a union solely for the purpose of showcasing women’s gymnastics on the East Coast. The league presently consists of the University of Maryland, University of North Carolina, and North Carolina State University of the Atlantic Coast Conference; University of Pittsburgh, Rutgers University and West Virginia University of the Big East Conference; George Washington of the Atlantic 10 Conference and the University of New Hampshire of the America East Conference. Towson University, one of the original league members, left EAGL in 2005 to rejoin the Eastern College Athletic Conference. In August 1996, the NCAA Council accepted the EAGL as an official affiliated member of the NCAA.

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China vs. Austria in Beach Volleyball - Summer Olympics Beijing 2008.jpg
China vs. Austria in Olympic Beach Volleyball. The Austrian team are sisters.


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Faith Yvonne Leech (born 31 March 1941 in Bendigo, Victoria, Australia) is a former Australian freestyle swimmer who won gold in the 4 × 100 metres (m) freestyle relay and bronze in the 100 m freestyle at the 1956 Summer Olympics in Melbourne.

A tall and lean swimmer known for her elegant technique, Leech started swimming as a child to build strength after a series of eating disorders in her infancy. She quickly rose to prominence after breaking a string of age group records. In 1955, she became the youngest swimmer to win an Australian title, claiming victory in the 110 yd (100 m) at the age of 13. She twice broke the Australian record in the 100 yards (yd) freestyle in late 1955, thereby positioning herself as a leading contender for Olympic selection in 1956. Leech's preparation was hindered by illness, which forced her out of the 1956 Australian Championships, but she recovered to gain Olympic selection in both the 100 m freestyle and the corresponding relay. Leech produced a late surge to take bronze in the individual event and seal an Australian trifecta, before swimming the second leg in the relay to help secure an Australian victory in world record time. Leech retired after the Olympics at the age of 15; she cited anxiety caused by racing as one of the main factors in her decision.

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August 16

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