Portal:Women's sport

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The Women's Sport Portal
This is a sister portal of the Sport Portal and Feminism Portal

Introduction

Black and white picture of several women on roller skates coming around a curve in a roller derby track
Women's sports include amateur and professional competitions in virtually all sports. Female participation in sports rose dramatically in the twentieth century, especially in the last quarter, reflecting changes in modern societies that emphasized gender parity. Although the level of participation and performance still varies greatly by country and by sport, women's sports have broad acceptance throughout the world, and in a few instances, such as tennis and figure skating, rival or exceed their male counterparts in popularity.

Few women competed in sports until the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as social changes in Europe and North America favored increased female participation in society as equals with men. Although women were permitted to participate in many sports, relatively few showed interest, and there was often disapproval of those who did. The modern Olympics had female competitors from 1900 onward, though women at first participated in considerably fewer events than men. Concern over the physical strength and stamina of women led to the discouragement of female participation in more physically intensive sports, and in some cases led to less physically demanding female versions of male sports. Thus netball was developed out of basketball and softball out of baseball.

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The Cook Islands are a major netball playing country in Oceania, with more than 1,000 registered players. The game became popular during the 1970s, and the national team has been important in the region since then. The Cook Islands Netball Association is a member of Oceania Netball Federation. The country has participated at several international events including the Pacific Games, the Commonwealth Games, the World Games, the Oceania Netball Tournament, the World Youth Netball Championship, and the International Challenge Men’s and Mixed Netball Tournament. The women's national team is one of the top ranked in the world.

Netball has grassroots support and plays an important part in the life of women on the islands. There are over 15 netball clubs and the game is played at schools. The game is played at national festivals like the Manea Games. The game is also being played by men. There have been several people have been important in terms of helping to develop the game in the Cook Islands and to raise the profile of the country internationally.

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The Camogie Association was founded in 8 North Frederick St, Dublin on February 25th 1905, with Máire Ní Chinnéide as President. In 1911, it was reconstituted as Cualacht Luithchleas na mBan Gaedheal at a meeting organised by Seaghán Ua Dúbhtaigh at 25 Rutland Square (now Parnell Square), Dublin. It was revived in 1923 and the first congress held on the 25th April 1925, when over 100 delegates gathered in Conarchy's Hotel, Parnell Square. It was reconstituted again in 1939 as Cumann Camogaiochta na nGael. For a period in the 1930s it organised women’s athletics events. A breakaway Cualacht Luithchleas na mBan Gaedheal continued in existence during 1939-51 as clubs in Cork, Dublin, Kildare, Meath and Wicklow disaffiliated in a series of disputes, largely over whether male officials should be allowed to hold office and whether players of ladies' hockey should be allowed play camogie. The last of these disputes was not resolved until 1951. The decision to change the playing rules from 12-a-side to 15-a-side teams and to use the larger GAA-style field led to an increase of affiliations after 1999 from 400 clubs to 540 a decade later.

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Dorothea Douglass.jpg
Dorothea Douglas, Wimbledon and Olympic Games tennis champion. Picture taken in 1903.


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Singaporean Paralympians Eric Ting Chee Keong, Jovin Tan Wei Qiang, Tan and Yip Pin Xiu at a Paralympics Celebration Ceremony at Cathay Cineleisure Orchard on 20 September 2008

Laurentia Tan Yen Yi (/lɒˈrɛnʃə/ lo-REN-shə; Chinese: 陈雁仪; pinyin: Chén Yànyí, pronounced [tʂə̌n jɛ̂n í]) (born 24 April 1979) is a United Kingdom-based Singaporean Paralympic equestrienne. Tan developed cerebral palsy and profound deafness after birth, and moved to the United Kingdom with her parents at the age of three. She took up horse riding at age of five years as a form of physiotherapy. She subsequently completed her A-levels at the Mary Hare Grammar School, a residential special school for the deaf, and graduated with an honours degree from Oxford Brookes University in hospitality management and tourism.

In March 2007, the Riding for the Disabled Association Singapore (RDA) invited Tan to join the Singapore team for the World Para Dressage Championships at Hartpury College in Hartpury, Gloucester, in England in July that year. At this event, her first international competition, she did well enough to qualify for the 2008 Paralympic Games. In September 2008, at the Hong Kong Olympic Equestrian Centre at Sha Tin, she achieved bronze medals in the Individual Championship and Individual Freestyle Tests (class IA). These were Singapore's first Paralympic medals and Asia's first equestrian medals at the Paralympic Games. Tan was conferred the Pingat Bakti Masyarakat (Public Service Medal) by the President of Singapore at a ceremony at the Istana Singapore on 20 September 2008.

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October 22

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