Postal interception

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Postal interception is the act of retrieving another person's mail for the purpose of ensuring that the mail is not delivered to the recipient, or to spy on them.

For instance, the CIA and FBI were involved in numerous large-scale operations targeting U.S. activist groups, whose mail was opened and photographed. In one such programme, over 215,000 letters were opened.[1][2] In the United Kingdom, the Special Investigations Unit of the General Post Office was responsible for postal interception.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "SUPPLEMENTARY DETAILED STAFF REPORTS ON INTELLIGENCE ACTIVITIES AND THE RIGHTS OF AMERICANS: ... DOMESTIC CIA AND FBI MAIL OPENING PROGRAMS". SELECT COMMITTEE TO STUDY GOVERNMENTAL OPERATIONS WITH RESPECT TO INTELLIGENCE ACTIVITIES UNITED STATES SENATE. April 23, 1976. Retrieved 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ Goldstein, Robert. Political Repression in Modern America. University of Illinois Press. 
  3. ^ Saunders, Frances Stonor. "Stuck on the Flypaper: MI5 and the Hobsbawm File". London Review of Books. 9 April 2015.