Postural restoration

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Postural restoration is a posture based approach to physical medicine. Its advocates claim that it improves postural adaptations, the function of the respiratory system and asymmetrical patterns. They claim that the treatment aims to maximize neutrality in the body through manual and non-manual exercise techniques designed to reposition, retrain, and restore these asymmetrical patterned positions.[1] It is used by some physical therapy and athletic trainers.[2] There is no good evidence that this method is effective.

Mechanism[edit]

Advocates for this technique claim that it can improve breathing mechanics, including diaphragmatic function. They use the term "zone of apposition" to describe where the diaphragm attaches to the rib cage.[3] The diaphragm's mechanical action and respiratory advantage depends on its relationship and anatomical arrangement with the rib cage.[4][5]

History[edit]

Physical therapist Ron Hruska developed his method postural restoration in the early 1990s. In 1999, he founded the Postural Restoration Institute, located in Lincoln, Nebraska, to train other healthcare professionals in his method.[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Spence, Holly (April 2008). "Case study report: postural restoration: an effective physical therapy approach to patient treatment". Techniques in Regional Anesthesia and Pain Management. 12 (2): 102–104. doi:10.1053/j.trap.2008.01.003. 
  2. ^ a b Boyle, Kyndall, L. (2006). Ethnography of the Postural Restoration Subculture: a Posture Based Approach to Patient/Client Management. Nova Southeastern University. 
  3. ^ Boyle, Kyndall L.; Olinick, Josh; Lewis, Cynthia (September 2010). "The Value of Blowing up a Balloon". North American Journal of Sports Physical Therapy. 5 (3): 179–188. PMC 2971640Freely accessible. PMID 21589673. 
  4. ^ Goldman, M.; Mead J. (1973). "Mechanical interaction between the diaphragm and the rib cage". Journal of Applied Physiology. 35 (2). 
  5. ^ Mead, J. (1979). "Functional significance of the area of apposition of diaphragm to rib cage". The American Review of Respiratory Disease. 11 (31).