Potassium tellurite

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Potassium tellurite
Kaliumtellurit.png
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.029.285 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 232-213-1
UNII
  • InChI=1S/2K.H2O3Te/c;;1-4(2)3/h;;(H2,1,2,3)/q2*+1;/p-2
    Key: BFPJYWDBBLZXOM-UHFFFAOYSA-L
  • [O-][Te](=O)[O-].[K+].[K+]
Properties
K2TeO3
Appearance white crystals, powder
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS06: ToxicGHS07: Exclamation mark
Danger
H301, H315, H319, H335
P261, P264, P270, P271, P280, P301+P310, P302+P352, P304+P340, P305+P351+P338, P312, P321, P330, P332+P313, P337+P313, P362, P403+P233, P405, P501
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Potassium tellurite, K2TeO3, is an inorganic potassium-tellurium compound.[1] It has been used as a selective growth medium in microbiology.[2][3][4][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Potassium tellurite". Sigma-Aldrich. Retrieved 24 December 2018.
  2. ^ Gilbert, R; Humphreys, EM (February 1926). "The Use of Potassium Tellurite in Differential Media". Journal of Bacteriology. 11 (2): 141–51. PMC 374860. PMID 16559175.
  3. ^ Advances in Microbial Physiology. Elsevier. 6 September 2007. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-08-056064-9.
  4. ^ J.E.L. Corry; G.D.W. Curtis; Rosamund M. Baird (6 May 2003). Handbook of Culture Media for Food Microbiology, Second Edition. Elsevier. p. 95. ISBN 978-0-444-51084-6.
  5. ^ Elliot T. Ryser; Elmer H. Marth (27 March 2007). Listeria, Listeriosis, and Food Safety. CRC Press. pp. 219–220. ISBN 978-1-4200-1518-8.