Pothohari dialect

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Pothohari
Potwari, Potowari
پوٹھوہاری
Native to Pakistan, India
Region Pothohar region, Azad Kashmir and Poonch (Jammu and Kashmir)
Native speakers
2.5 million including Dhundi-Kairali, Chibhali, & Punchhi, but perhaps not 1.04 million Mirpuri (2007)[1]
Language codes
ISO 639-3 phr (includes other dialects)
Glottolog paha1251  (Pahari Potwari)[3]
mirp1238  (Mirpur Panjabi)[4]
Dialects Of Punjabi.jpg
Punjabi–Lahnda dialects. Pothohari is center-north.
Further information: Punjabi dialects

Pothohari (Western Punjabi: پوٹھوہاری), Pahari-Potowari, or Potwari is a dialect of Punjabi[5] spoken by inhabitants of the Pothohar Plateau in northern Punjab and in Azad Kashmir, Pakistan and Poonch of Jammu and Kashmir, India.

Potohar scenery with pahar backdrop

Classification[edit]

Since Punjabi, Urdu/Hindi are spoken in a region that has witnessed significant ethnic and identity conflict, all have been exposed to the dialect versus language question. Each of these languages possesses a central standard on which its literature is based, and from which there are multiple dialectal variations.[6]

It had been historically classified as dialect of Punjabi. In the 1920s, George A. Grierson, in his Linguist Survey of India classified into Northern cluster of Western Punjabi . Recently Potowari is claimed as language contrasting the view of being a dialect of Punjabi, However these claims are controversial to date. [7]:838 [8]:46

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pothohari at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. ^ "Western Panjabi". Ethnologue. Retrieved 21 July 2016. 
  3. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin; Bank, Sebastian, eds. (2016). "Pahari Potwari". Glottolog 2.7. Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  4. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin; Bank, Sebastian, eds. (2016). "Mirpur Panjabi". Glottolog 2.7. Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  5. ^ Colin P. Masica, 1991, The Indo-Aryan Languages
  6. ^ Bailey, Rev. T. Grahame. 1904. Panjabi Grammar. Lahore: Punjab Government Press.
  7. ^ Rahman, Tariq. 1997. Language and Ethnicity in Pakistan. Asian Survey, 1997 Sep., 37(9):833-839.
  8. ^ Javaid, Umbreen. 2004. Saraiki political movement: its impact in south Punjab. Journal of Research (Humanities), 40(2): 55–65. Lahore: Faculty of Arts and Humanities, University of the Punjab. (This PDF contains multiple articles from the same issue.)

External links[edit]