Potternewton

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Potternewton is a suburb and parish between Chapeltown and Chapel Allerton in north-east Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. It is in the Chapel Allerton ward of Leeds City Council.

Potternewton Park
Skate park in Potternewton Park

Potternewton is bounded by Scott Hall Road to the west, Roundhay Road to the east and Harehills Lane to the north. The main thoroughfare is Chapeltown Road. The suburb is often considered to be part of Chapeltown. On older maps, Potternewton included the Chapeltown and Scott Hall areas and parts of Harehills. Potternewton is an historic village and many older maps prioritise the name Potternewton over Chapeltown.[1]

History[edit]

As Lords of the Manor of Potternewton, the Earl of Mexborough and Earl Cowper had released parts of their estates by the 1700s and were in and out of court up until 1801 disputing who had legal entitlement to the land each of them occupied. Around this time, James Brown, a Mesne lord under Earl Cowper, owned the copyhold of much of the area of what became known as Chapeltown.[2][3][4]

By the early 19th century a number of mansions, some with extensive grounds, had been established around Potternewton and Chapeltown roads: James Brown owned Harehills Grove (later named Potternewton Park Mansion),[5] the Scott family owned the mid-18th century Scott Hall[6] and the copyhold and leasehold of Potternewton Lodge, Potternewton Hall and the adjacent Newton Hall Estates were all owned by the Lupton family. Old deeds and maps of sale plans of the Earl of Mexborough's Potternewton landholdings show that in 1845, the copyhold of the Newton Hall estate was owned by Arthur Lupton, a Mesne lord under the earl. The map shows that surveyor Henry Teal had divided the land remaining in the earl's possession into lots for sale.[7][8][9]

In 1870, the Potternewton township, covering 1,667 acres about two miles north of Leeds, comprised the villages of New Leeds and part of Buslingthorpe, and the hamlets of Gipton, Harehills, and Squire-Pastures. Part of its name is from supposedly Roman, "very ancient pottery", found in the vicinity. Coal was mined and stone was quarried. Over time the manor belonged to the Mauleverers, the Scotts of Scott Hall, the Hardwicks and in 1870 belonged to the Earl of Mexborough.[10]

Potternewton Hall and Newton Park Estate[edit]

Potternewton Hall, built c. 1720, home of the Lupton family. Photo c. 1860–70

Potternewton Hall was a country house built by the Barker family c. 1720. In the 1830s it was the residence of Darnton Lupton,[11] whose brother Arthur acquired the adjacent Newton Hall and its surrounding parkland, farmhouse, fields, farm, stables and cottages in the 1840s. Darnton's brother Francis lived at Potternewton Hall from 1847, purchasing the copyhold of the estate from the Barker/Ray family by 1860. Francis raised his family at the hall until the early 1860s. In 1870, Francis and Darnton purchased the adjoining Newton Hall estate from their brother.[12][13][14][15][16][17][18]

Arthur Lupton arranged for a Congregationalist chapel to be built on his land in 1847.[19][20] In 1870, he sold the estate to his brothers who built a new chapel on Chapeltown Road. Following Darnton Lupton's death in 1873, Francis inherited the bulk of the estate and oversaw the building of the Anglican St Martin's Church in 1879 near the Newton Hall Lodge.[21] When Francis Lupton died in 1884, his wife Frances refused to take up the position of executor which passed to her four sons.[22] The family chapel was grandly re-built in 1887 as the Newton Park Union Church.[23][24]

Portion of 1920 Newton Park map showing property inherited by sisters Olive Middleton and Anne Lupton

Published diaries of Katherine Roubiliac Conder (1860-1948), granddaughter of Sir Edward Baines, record that her father, Eustace Conder, preached at Newton Park Chapel in 1874 where Herbert Gladstone, 1st Viscount Gladstone was worshipping in May 1880. In March 1880, Gladstonian liberalism was at its peak at Newton Park; in 1880, Sir John Barran talked of himself and Herbert Gladstone, the Liberal M.P. for Leeds in 1880, as being "one man".[25] Sir John Barren laid the foundation stone of the Newton Congregational Chapel in 1870 and its successor, the Newton Park Union Church in 1887. His son, Sir Rowland Hirst Barran was the M.P. for North Leeds (the Newton Park area) from 1902 to 1918.[26][27][28]

By the outbreak of the Second World War, Newton Hall and Potternewton Hall had been demolished and replaced by the city's largest private housing estate.[12][13][14][29][30][31]

Olive Middleton (née Lupton) grew up at Rockland in Potternewton. Her father, politician Frank Lupton, developed the estate[32] and built a shopping parade built on Chapeltown Road in 1891.[33][34][13] Some months after her birth in 1881, Olive Middleton's great grandfather, Dr Thomas Michael Greenhow, died at Newton Hall as did his second wife, Anne Greenhow (née Lupton) in 1905.[35][36][37]

Potternewton Park Mansion and park[edit]

Built c. 1817. The mansion at Potternewton Park from a postcard postmarked October 1909.

Harehills Grove, a country house, was built around 1817 for the woollen merchant James Brown. The Jowitt family owned it in 1861 and they later sold the 750 acre estate and back-to-back terraced houses were built on it. The house and its 30 acre park were bought by the Leeds Corporation to create Potternewton Park in 1900. By 1906 the house had been renamed Potternewton Mansion and was opened to the public in 1906. After 1929 the house was used for educational purposes.[5]

The Leeds Carnival procession starts and finishes at Potternewton Park.

21st century[edit]

Transport Direct uses the names Potternewton and Chapeltown for separate areas. Potternewton is the small area around the north of Scott Hall Road around the Scott Hall Road/Potternewton Lane roundabout as most of the area is classified today as Chapeltown. WYMetro and Transport Direct also identify the area as being in this location. Potternewton Lane is served by bus service 7.

Millfield Primary School, formerly known as Potternewton Primary, is located on Potternewton Mount.

St Martin's Church[edit]

St Martin's Church, Newton Park Estate (1879-81)

St Martin's Church, the Anglican parish church, off Chapeltown Road was built in 1879–1881 on land owned by the Lupton family.[33][38] The formation of the parish was the result of a meeting held at the Leeds Church Institute in April 1876, presided over by the Vicar of Leeds, Dr Gott. The site for St Martin's had been confirmed in June 1876. The church was designed by Adams & Kelly of Leeds was consecrated in 1881.[39] It was built of stone from local quarries.

The original design had a steeple, but lack of funds prevented its construction. St Martin's Church has a mainly West Indian congregation.[40][41][42]

People of Potternewton[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Godfrey, A. (8 August 2017). "Old Ordnance Survey Maps of Leeds -". Consett, Co Durham: Alan Godfrey Maps. Here are the details of maps for Leeds (Leeds North, i.e. Newton Park) and Chapeltown....This map covers several districts, and is centred on what we now know as Chapeltown... Our maps show the area as it was being developed, with large mansions such as Potternewton Hall.....Newton Hall....and The Mansion...
  2. ^ Westwood, S. (11 May 2018). "Imagining Cities". Routledge. Retrieved 16 January 2019.
  3. ^ Moorhouse, S. (1981). "West Yorkshire : an Archaeological Survey". West Yorkshire Metropolitan County Council. p. 480 - 481. Retrieved 16 January 2019. ...the 1379 Poll Tax suggests that it had become part of Potter Newton by the fourteenth century. Potter Newton: The mesne lordship of Potternewton was probably held by ....
  4. ^ Great Britain. Court of Chancery, Thomas Vernon, John Raithby. "Cases Argued and Adjudged in the High Court of Chancery". J. Butterworth and Son, 1828. p. 651. Retrieved 16 January 2019. But Mr Brown surmises that the condition of their lordships order was not complied with, for in the above clause, Lord (Earl) Cowper set the deeds aside....CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)
  5. ^ a b "Potternewton Park Mansion, Harehills Lane". Leodis – A photographic history of Leeds. UK Gov Leeds City Council. Retrieved 29 August 2014.
  6. ^ "Scott Hall - SALE". The Houseshop. Retrieved 17 January 2019. Scott Hall - Grade II listed mid-18th century house...Queen Anne style off Scott Hall street...
  7. ^ Brown, W. (14 February 2013) [1909-1955]. "Yorkshire Deeds:, Volume 1-10". Cambridge University Press. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  8. ^ Colin Treen (2018). "The Thoresby Society - The Society's Archives (Sales Particulars)". The Thoresby Society. Sale - 1845: Leeds and Potternewton (35 lots of building land) on Earl of Mexborough's Potternewton Estate - Surveyor: Henry Teal, 60 x 50 - Leeds City Archives, MX 2017/1 [Map of Newton Hall estate, otherwise Low Hall and Close (estate) of Arthur Lupton, Esq.
  9. ^ "The Law Times, Volume 35". Butterworths., 1860. p. 374. Retrieved 13 January 2019. In Chancery.....the matter of an undivided MOIETY of freehold and leasehold estates, devised by the will of Henry Belward Ray....for the sale to Arthur Lupton Esq. of undivided moiety of certain leasehold tenements called Potternewton Lodge...and that....(Mr) Wynne might be at liberty to proceed to sell the testator's undivided moiety in the rest of the Potternewton property, in the petitioned mentioned.....
  10. ^ "Potter Newton West Riding". Vision of Britain. Retrieved 5 August 2017.
  11. ^ Haigh, T. (1839). "A General and Commercial Directory of the Borough of Leeds, etc". Baines & Company. Retrieved 9 January 2019. 1839 - Darnton Lupton, Potternewton Hall
  12. ^ a b Laycock, Mike (17 March 2015). "Duchess of Cambridge's links with stately home near York revealed". The Press. Retrieved 19 March 2015.
  13. ^ a b c "Chapeltown Conservation Area Appraisal" (PDF). Leeds City Council. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 October 2018. Retrieved 20 September 2017.
  14. ^ a b "Potternewton, entrance gates". Leodis – A photographic History of Leeds. Leeds City Council. Retrieved 20 September 2017.
  15. ^ "Potternewton Hall, Potternewton Lane". Leodis – A photographic history of Leeds. Leeds City Council. Retrieved 29 August 2014.
  16. ^ "Sale – The Newton Hall Estate – Containing about 50 acres". Leeds Intelligencer. West Yorkshire, England. 16 June 1866. Retrieved 20 September 2017. ....comprising about 50 acres, consists of the park, the farmstead, and the meadow fields, all in a ring fence front of the house: closely adjoining a Farm, of about 10 acres, with a good farmhouse, stables, and cottages: a small field of about one acre, called...(also,...Leeds Intelligencer West Yorkshire, England – 21 January 1860 – PRELIMINARY ADVERTISEMENT. POTTERNEWTON HALL ESTATE.— This valuable Estate, consisting of Potternewton Hall, and about 47 Acres of Land, lying in elevated....)
  17. ^ Bebbington, D. (2000). "Gladstone Centenary Essays". Liverpool University Press. pp. 158, 159. ISBN 9780853239253. Retrieved 14 December 2018. Sir John Barren laid the foundation stone of the Newton Park Union Church in October 1887
  18. ^ Barker, E. "The Will of M. A. M. Faber, with Facts and Observations Proving Its ..." Edmund Henry Barker 1821. p. 24-28. Retrieved 15 January 2019. Edmund Henry Barker was considered the next heir to the Barker Estates....Miss Barker had heard that the House (Potternewton Hall) had been erected on copyhold land belonging to Lord (Earl) Cowper...the lower House was shut up and Miss Barker went to live with Mrs Ray - then known as Miss Barker - at the upper House...
  19. ^ Wolffe, J. (2000). "Yorkshire Returns of the 1851 Census of Religious Worship: West Riding (North)". Borthwick Publications. Retrieved 9 January 2019. Potternewton Preaching Room (Congregational chapel), erected 1847
  20. ^ Mayhall, J. (1848). "The Annals of Yorkshire: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Volume 3". Simpkin, Marshall & Company. Retrieved 9 January 2019. A Congregational Chapel, on the Newton Hall Estate, Leeds, for the use of the Potternewton congregation, was opened in 1847....(John Mayhall, 1848)
  21. ^ Historic England. "Former lodge to Newton Hall with gate piers and flanking wall (1255604)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 12 January 2019. "Arthur's brothers, Francis and Darnton, developed the grounds south of the hall as a building speculation and the lodge was cut off from the house by the time the Church of St Martin, St Martin's View (qv) was built, 1879."
  22. ^ Happenupon. "Who Lived In Penraevon?". happenupon. Retrieved 10 January 2019. 1884 - Francis Lupton (owner of the Newton Park Estate) dies leaving his wife Frances as Executor a position she refuses to take up and passes to her sons.....1886, 30th Nov. - Arthur Currer Briggs buys the second plot of land adjacent to the house from Francis Martineau Lupton (owner of Rocklands), Arthur Greenhow Lupton, Charles (Chas) Lupton and Hugh Lupton (owners of Newton Park Estate).
  23. ^ Bebbington, D. (2000). Gladstone Centenary Essays. Liverpool University Press. p. 157. Retrieved 9 January 2019. In October 1887 Edward Crossley had laid the foundation stone for the grandly re-built Newton Park Union Church.
  24. ^ Historic England. "Former Union Chapel and Congregational Chapel (1255644)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 10 January 2019. "The first building on the site (Chapeltown Road, Newton Hall Estate) was a Congregational Chapel built in 1870-71 by W. H. Harris, it was known as the Newton Park Congregational Church. This was extensively damaged by fire in 2005. In 1887 the Newton Park Union Chapel, serving both Baptist and Congregational denominations was constructed on the eastern side of the chapel, designed by Archibald Nevill, a Leeds architect."
  25. ^ Bebbington, D. (2000). Gladstone Centenary Essays. Liverpool University Press. pp. 138–152. Retrieved 9 January 2019. (page 146) Mr (later Sir John) Barran talked of himself and Herbert (Gladstone) as being "one man".
  26. ^ D. T. Jenkins (2004). "Barran family (per. c.1842–1952)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 28 November 2007.
  27. ^ House of Commons: Ladywood to Leek, leighrayment.com
  28. ^ Bebbington, D. (2000). Gladstone Centenary Essays. Liverpool University Press. pp. 138–152. ISBN 0853239355. Retrieved 9 January 2019. Newton Park had a real family investment in Gladstonianism (page 149).....March 1st, 1874: Papa preached at Newton Chapel....May 10th, 1880: met Rose and Emily who sat opposite Mr Herbert Gladstone in Church yesterday.....(page 158): Sir John Barren laid the foundation stone of both the Newton Congregational Chapel in 1870 and that of it's grand successor, the Newton Park Union church in 1887
  29. ^ "Potternewton Hall, Potternewton Lane". Leodis – A photographic history of Leeds. Leeds City Council. Retrieved 29 August 2014.
  30. ^ "Sale – The Newton Hall Estate – Containing about 50 acres". Leeds Intelligencer. West Yorkshire, England. 16 June 1866. Retrieved 20 September 2017. ....comprising about 50 acres, consists of the park, the farmstead, and the meadow fields, all in a ring fence front of the house: closely adjoining a Farm, of about 10 acres, with a good farmhouse, stables, and cottages: a small field of about one acre, called...(also,...Leeds Intelligencer West Yorkshire, England – 21st January 1860 – PRELIMINARY ADVERTISEMENT. POTTERNEWTON HALL ESTATE.— This valuable Estate, consisting of Potternewton Hall, and about 47 Acres of Land, lying in elevated....)
  31. ^ Bebbington, D. (2000). "Gladstone Centenary Essays". Liverpool University Press. pp. 158, 159. ISBN 9780853239253. Retrieved 14 December 2018. Sir John Barren laid the foundation stone of the Newton Park Union Church in October 1887
  32. ^ de Vries, S. "Royal Marriages: Diana, Camilla, Kate & Meghan and princesses who did not live happily ever after". Pirgos Press 2018. Retrieved 30 October 2018. Francis Martineau Lupton was a wealthy mill owner and industrialist turned philanthropist who owned Potternewton/Newton Hall (Estate) in Leeds...
  33. ^ a b Historic England. "Former lodge to Newton Hall with gate piers and flanking wall (1255604)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 December 2015.
  34. ^ "Rockland; home of Francis Martineau Lupton and daughter Olive Middleton". Leodis – A photographic archive of Leeds. Leeds City Council. Retrieved 19 March 2015.
  35. ^ The London Gazette. Tho. Newcomb over against Baynards Castle in Thamse-street, 1905. 1905. p. 3468. Retrieved 1 February 2019. or demands against the estate of Mrs. Anne Greenhow (née Lupton), late of Newton Hall, Chapel Allerton, in the city of Leeds, Widow of Dr Thomas Michael Greenhow, ... Majesty's High Court of Justice, on the 6th day of May, 1905, by William Walter Lupton, Francis Martineau Lupton and...
  36. ^ "Mrs. Anne Greenhow of Leeds". Leeds Mercury. Yorkshire, England. 19 May 1905. Retrieved 1 February 2019. Mrs Anne Greenhow of Newton Hall, Chapel Allerton...died 5th April 1905, aged 95 years, daughter of William Lupton of Leeds and widow of Dr Thomas Michael Greenhow.....
  37. ^ British Medical Journal, Volume 2. British Medical Association, 1881. 1881. p. 799. Retrieved 1 February 2019. OBITUARY, THOMAS M. GREENHOW, M.D., F.R.C.S. ON October 25th, in his ninetieth year, died at Newton Hall,...
  38. ^ Conservation Area Appraisal, Chapeltown. "Chapeltown Conservation Area Appraisal" (PDF). UK GOV. Leeds City Council. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 September 2014. Retrieved 29 August 2013.
  39. ^ "St. Martin's Church". Leodis – a photographic archive of Leeds. Retrieved 1 March 2014.
  40. ^ "History". St Martin's Church, Leeds. Retrieved 1 March 2014.
  41. ^ "St Martin's Church, Chapeltown Road". Leodis – a photographic archive of Leeds. Retrieved 8 March 2014.
  42. ^ Broadbent, Helen. "Church Archives, St Martins Church". St Martins Church, Potternewton. Retrieved 17 September 2014.
  43. ^ Herring, Sarah (30 May 2013) [2004]. "Holroyd, Sir Charles (1861–1917)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/33961. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)

External links[edit]

Location grid[edit]

Coordinates: 53°49′13″N 1°32′00″W / 53.8202°N 1.5332°W / 53.8202; -1.5332