Poultice

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Schoolgirls in Britain being shown how to make a poultice, 1942

A poultice, also called a cataplasm, is a soft moist mass, often heated and medicated, that is spread on cloth over the skin to treat an aching, inflamed or painful part of the body. It can be used on wounds such as cuts.

Poultice may also refer to a porous solid filled with solvent used to remove stains from porous stone such as marble or granite.

The word "poultice" comes from the Latin puls, pultes, meaning "porridge".

Types[edit]

Inflammation treatment[edit]

Linseed flax (Linum usitatissimum) may be used in a poultice for boils, inflammation and wounds.

A poultice is a proposed cooling product that is commonly used for showjumpers and racehorses, as it is often cheaper and easier to administer than many other cooling products. Ice Tite is a poultice that is applied to the horse’s distal limbs after exercise, for 9 - 12 hours. The intended effect of Ice Tite is to cool the horse’s legs over a long period of time, by drawing heat out of the leg through evaporation. It is common practice to bandage over the Ice Tite, using bandages and bandage fillers, and to place either wet newspaper or cellophane wrap between the Ice Tite and bandages, yet bandaging over the poultice may also prevent the action of heat evaporation and, therefore, prevent cooling i.e. heat can’t escape. It is also worth noting dry poultice stores heat.[30]


Poultices may also be heated and placed on an area where extra circulation is desired.

Stain removal from decorative stone surfaces[edit]

Stone is a porous material which is susceptible to staining. Granite and marble are frequently used in residential construction of bathrooms and kitchens and are susceptible to a variety of stains.

From a chemical standpoint, a porous stone becomes stained when a solution containing a solute penetrates its surface and then evaporates leaving the solid solute behind within the stone. Alternatively, grease may penetrate the porous surface and remain within the stone without evaporating. In either case, the stone will become visibly "stained".

Poultices for removing stains are made from a malleable mass of a porous material (paper, whiting, diatomaceous earth, flour,[31] limestone) filled with a solvent which can be applied to the surface of the stone. The solvent used (ammonia, acetone, alcohol, peroxide,[31] etc.) depends on what substance caused the stain. As the solvent penetrates the surface of the porous stone containing the stain, it forms a single continuous solution between the stone and the poultice on the surface. The poultice is kept moist and covered to allow time for the solvent to sufficiently penetrate the stone and dissolve the staining material, be it grease or solute. The solute will then equilibrate by passive diffusion between the stone and the poultice. After an adequate time for this process to occur, the poultice is removed and with it the solution containing a portion of the dissolved solute or "stain". Multiple repetitions of the process will eventually decrease the concentration of the solute or "stain" within the stone until it is invisible or minimally visible.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Roberts, Margaret. Edible & Medicinal Flowers. Cape Town, South Africa: New Africa Books, 2000. ISBN 0-86486-467-1
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  29. ^ Morritt AN, Bache SE, Ralston D, Stephenson AJ., Coal ash poultice: an unusual cause of a chemical burn., J Burn Care Res, 2009 Nov-Dec;30(6):1046-7.
  30. ^ Your Vet Online https://www.yourvetonline.com/how-to-care-for-horse-legs/. Retrieved 27 May 2019. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  31. ^ a b "How to Remove Spots from Kitchen Countertops". 2007-09-11.