Pound (currency)

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Countries where a unit of the national currency is "pound" (dark blue) or "lira" (light blue).

Pound is the name for a unit of currency. It is used in some countries today and previously was used in many others. The English word pound derives from the Latin expression lībra pondō, in which lībra is a noun meaning "pound" and pondō is an adverb meaning "by weight".[1][2] The currency's symbol is £, a stylised form of the blackletter L () (from libra), crossed to indicate abbreviation.

The term was adopted in England from the weight[a] of silver used to make to 240 pennies,[5] and eventually spread to British colonies all over the world. While silver pennies were produced seven centuries earlier, the first pound coin was minted under Henry VII in 1489.[4]

Countries and territories currently using currency units named "pound"[edit]

Country/territory Currency ISO 4217 code Tied to sterling?
 Egypt Egyptian pound EGP No
 Falkland Islands Falkland Islands pound FKP Yes
Gibraltar Gibraltar Gibraltar pound GIP Yes
 Guernsey Guernsey pound GBP Yes
 Isle of Man Manx pound GBP Yes
 Jersey Jersey pound GBP Yes
 Lebanon Lebanese pound LBP No
 Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Helena pound SHP Yes
 South Sudan South Sudanese pound SSP No
 Sudan Sudanese pound SDG No
 Syria Syrian pound SYP No
 United Kingdom Sterling GBP N/A
 British Antarctic Territory[6]
 British Indian Ocean Territory[7]
 South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands[8]

Historical currencies[edit]

Currencies of the former British colonies in America[edit]

All of the following currencies have been replaced by the US dollar.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Pound (mass) in question was a Tower pound (5,400 grains, 349.9 grams (11.25 troy ounces), about 0.77 avoirdupois pounds, also called the 'Moneyers' Pound' (referring to the Saxon moneyers before the Conquest).[3] "In practice they" [the silver pennies] "varied considerably in weight and 240 of them seldom added up to a pound".[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Harper, Douglas. "Libra (n.)". Online Etymology Dictionary. Archived from the original on 22 June 2022.
  2. ^ Harper, Douglas. "pound (n.1)". Online Etymology Dictionary. Archived from the original on 25 May 2022.
  3. ^ "Tower pound". Sizes.com. Retrieved 17 September 2016.
  4. ^ a b Lowther, Ed (14 February 2014). "A short history of the pound". BBC News. Archived from the original on 1 March 2014.
  5. ^ "Pound sterling". Britannica. Archived from the original on 16 June 2008. Retrieved 22 July 2021. Silver coins known as "sterlings" were issued in the Saxon kingdoms, 240 of them being minted from a pound of silver... Hence, large payments came to be reckoned in "pounds of sterlings," a phrase later shortened...
  6. ^ "Foreign and Commonwealth Office country profiles: British Antarctic Territory". Archived from the original on 2003-09-02.
  7. ^ "Foreign and Commonwealth Office country profiles: British Indian Ocean Territory". Archived from the original on October 16, 2007.
  8. ^ "Foreign and Commonwealth Office country profiles: South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands".