Pouteria lucuma

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Lúcuma
Lucuma.png
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Asterids
Order: Ericales
Family: Sapotaceae
Subfamily: Chrysophylloideae
Genus: Pouteria
Species: P. lucuma
Binomial name
Pouteria lucuma
(Ruiz & Pav.) Kuntze
Synonyms
  • Lucuma obovata
  • Pouteria obovata

The lúcuma (Pouteria lucuma) is a subtropical fruit native to the Andean valleys and produced in Chile, Peru, and Ecuador.[1][2]

Lúcuma has been found on ceramics at burial sites of the indigenous people of coastal Peru.[2] The Moche people had a fascination with agriculture and often chose to represent fruits and vegetables, including lúcuma, in their art.[3]

In Peru, harvesting season is from October to March and in Chile from June to November.[1]

History and characteristics[edit]

The fruit was first seen and reported by Europeans in Ecuador in 1531.[2][4] It is sometimes known as lucmo.[2] In the Philippines, it is known as tiesa and may be called "eggfruit" in English, a common name also given to the closely related canistel (Pouteria campechina). The name "eggfruit" refers to lúcuma's dry flesh, which is similar in texture to a hard-boiled egg yolk with a unique flavor of maple and sweet potato. The round or ovoid fruits are green, with a bright yellow flesh that is often fibrous.

It grows at temperate elevations between 2700-3000 metres.[2] Temperatures of its elevated native range make the species technically subtropical, even though its native region is strictly tropical. Attempts at growing lúcuma in Florida's climate typically fail.[2] In addition to Peru, the fruit is grown also to a limited extent in Bolivia and Costa Rica. It grows well in most tropical regions, but is not widely favored.

Taxonomy[edit]

Formerly known as Lucuma obovata, it is now considered a member of the genus Pouteria, and given the name Pouteria lucuma.[2] It is not the species Pouteria obovata.[2]

Uses[edit]

A group of Lúcumas from Chile.

When eaten raw, the fruit has a dry texture. [2] In Peru it is more commonly enjoyed as a flavor in juice, milk shakes, and especially ice cream. Its unique flavor in such preparations has been described variously as being similar to sweet potato, maple syrup, or butterscotch. A popular dessert called "merengue con salsa de lúcuma" is served in Chile. Also popular in Chile is "manjar con lúcuma" (dulce de leche with lúcuma purée).

Nutrients[edit]

Only limited nutritional information is available and only for lúcuma powder, indicating moderate content of protein and iron, each providing 14% of the Daily Value in a 100 gram serving which supplies 420 calories.[5]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "CAPÍTULO I: LA LÚCUMA (in Spanish)" (PDF). University of Piura, Peru. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Morton JF (1987). "Lucmo". Purdue University, republished from p. 405–406. In: Fruits of Warm Climates. Julia F. Morton, Miami, FL. 
  3. ^ Berrin, Katherine & Larco Museum. The Spirit of Ancient Peru:Treasures from the Museo Arqueológico Rafael Larco Herrera. New York: Thames and Hudson, 1997.
  4. ^ Lesser-known and under-utilised plant resources Ameenah Gurib-Fakim - 2005 - Page 59
  5. ^ "Lucuma powder per 100 g". Conde Nast, USDA National Nutrient Database, version SR-21. 2014. Retrieved 1 October 2015. 

External links[edit]