Power Macintosh 9500

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Power Macintosh 9500
Powermac9500.jpg
Release date May 1, 1995
Introductory price US$4,699 (equivalent to $7,386 in 2016)
Discontinued February 17, 1997
Operating system Mac OS 7.5.1-7.6.1, 8.0-8.6, 9.0-9.1
CPU PowerPC 604 @ 120,132,150,180x2,200 MHz
Memory Expandable to 1.5 GB (168 pin DIMM 5V)
Predecessor Macintosh Quadra 950
Successor Power Macintosh 9600

The Power Macintosh 9500 (sold as Power Macintosh 9515 in Europe and Asia[1]) is a personal computer designed, manufactured and sold by Apple Computer as part of the Power Macintosh line from May 1, 1995 until February 17, 1997. It is powered by a PowerPC 604 processor, a second-generation PowerPC chip which was faster than the PowerPC 601 chip used in the Quadra 950. The 180MP and 200 MHz models, introduced August 1996, use the enhanced PowerPC 604e processor.

MacWorld Magazine gave the 9500 a positive review, concluding that it is "not the second-generation Power Mac for the rest of us -- it's too pricey .... but it is an excellent foundation for a high-end graphics workstation -- for color publishing or media production. Its speed and expandability should also made it popular in the scientific and technical markets."[2] Their benchmarks showed that the 9500 overcame the Quadra 950's performance deficit when running older Mac software in the Mac 68k emulator, posting speeds almost twice as fast as the Quadra 900.

The 9500 includes several technological firsts for Apple. The CPU is connected via a daughterboard, and so could be swapped easily. Available were single-processor cards ranging from 120 to 200 MHz, and a dual processor card with two 180 MHz CPUs. This is also the Macintosh to use the PCI standard, with six PCI slots available -- one of which is used for a graphics card.[2] It's also the first to support 168-pin DIMM memory modules, and the 512KB of on-board 128-bit-wide cache utilizes copy-back instead of write-through, offering faster speeds than prior Macintosh models.[2] A regular 10BASE-T ethernet port is included for the first time, alongside the AAUI port, as is support for the new SCSI-2 Fast standard.

The basic design of the logic board, called "Tsunami", was used by various Macintosh clone makers as a reference design [3] and a modified version was used in the non-Macintosh Apple Network Server series.

Utilizing a third party G4 CPU upgrade[4] and the XPostFacto installation utility it is possible to run up to Mac OS X v10.5 "Leopard" on a 9500, making it the oldest model capable of running Mac OS X.

The 9500 was replaced by the Power Macintosh 9600.

Models[edit]

Introduced May 1, 1995:

  • Power Macintosh 9500/120[5]
  • Power Macintosh 9500/132[6]

Introduced October 2, 1995:

  • Power Macintosh 9515/132[7]

Introduced April 22, 1996:

  • Power Macintosh 9500/150[8]

Introduced August 5, 1996:

  • Power Macintosh 9500/180MP[9]
  • Power Macintosh 9500/200[10]

Timeline of Power Macintosh models

Power Macintosh G5 Power Macintosh G5 Power Macintosh G5 Power Macintosh G4 Power Macintosh G4 Power Macintosh G4 Cube Power Macintosh G4 Power Macintosh G3 (Blue %26 White) Power Macintosh G3 Power Macintosh G3 Power Macintosh 8600 Power Macintosh 7300 Power Macintosh 9600 Power Macintosh 8500 Power Macintosh 7600 Power Macintosh 7200 Power Macintosh 9500 Power Macintosh 8100 Power Macintosh 7500 Power Macintosh 7100 Power Macintosh 6400 Power Macintosh G3 Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh Power Macintosh 6300 Power Macintosh 5500 Power Macintosh 5260 Power Macintosh 6500 Power Macintosh 6200 Power Macintosh 6100 Power Macintosh 5400 Power Macintosh 5200 Power Macintosh 4400


References[edit]

External links[edit]