Power walking

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Power walking or speed walking is the act of walking with a speed at the upper end of the natural range for the walking gait, typically 7 to 9 km/h (4.5 to 5.5 mph). To qualify as power walking as opposed to jogging or running, at least one foot must be in contact with the ground at all times (see walking for a formal definition).

History and technique[edit]

Some powerwalkers walk with weights

In 1999, the Berlin Marathon included a Power Walking division.[1][2][3]

Power walking is often confused with racewalking.

Power walking techniques involve the following:

  • The walker must walk straight
  • The walker must walk doing an alternating movement of feet and arms
  • The walker must walk with one foot in permanent contact with the ground
  • The leading leg must be bent
  • Each advancing foot strike must be heel to toe at all times
  • The walker must walk not doing an exaggerated swivel to the hip
  • The arms spread completely from the elbows and these move back[4][5]

Power walking has been recommended by health experts such as Kenneth H. Cooper as an alternative to jogging for a low-to-moderate exercise regime, for instance 60–80% of maximum heart rate (HRmax). At the upper range, walking and jogging are almost equally efficient, and the walking gait gives significantly less impact to the joints.

Competitions and world records[edit]

Competitions are held for power walking competitions,[6] with world records held in categories including 5 km, 10 km, half marathon, 30 km, marathon, and multiday distances.[7][8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Hartwig Gauder und Friedegard Liedtke beim Power-Walking" (in German). Berlin Marathon. Retrieved 4 June 2021.
  2. ^ "Hartwig Gauder und Friedegard Liedtke beim Power-Walking" (in German). Berlin-Citynight. Retrieved 4 June 2021.
  3. ^ "Plusmarcas" (in Spanish). Speed Walking website. Retrieved 6 July 2019.
  4. ^ "Power Walking". Speed Walking -International Website-. Retrieved 20 July 2019.
  5. ^ "Power Walking". World Ranking -National and World Race Walking-. Retrieved 3 September 2019.
  6. ^ "Competiciones" (in Spanish). Speed Walking website. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  7. ^ "Plusmarcas" (in Spanish). Speed Walking website. Retrieved 6 July 2019.
  8. ^ "Speed Walking World Records". World Ranking -National and World Race Walking-. Retrieved 31 July 2020.
Sources

External links[edit]