Prairie Village, Kansas

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Prairie Village, Kansas
City
Location within Johnson County and Kansas
Location within Johnson County and Kansas
KDOT map of Johnson County (legend)
KDOT map of Johnson County (legend)
Coordinates: 38°59′23″N 94°38′10″W / 38.98972°N 94.63611°W / 38.98972; -94.63611Coordinates: 38°59′23″N 94°38′10″W / 38.98972°N 94.63611°W / 38.98972; -94.63611
Country United States
State Kansas
County Johnson
Area[1]
 • Total 6.21 sq mi (16.08 km2)
 • Land 6.20 sq mi (16.06 km2)
 • Water 0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation 988 ft (301 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 21,447
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 21,769
 • Density 3,500/sq mi (1,300/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Area code(s) 913
FIPS code 20-57575[4]
GNIS feature ID 0479232[5]
Website PVkansas.com

Prairie Village is a city in Johnson County, Kansas, United States, and part of the Kansas City Metropolitan Area. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 21,447.[6]

History[edit]

After the successful development of the Country Club Plaza in Kansas City, Missouri, J. C. Nichols turned toward development of his native Johnson County, just a few miles from the Plaza. Prairie Village was platted in 1941 and was named after Prairie School, which was established for almost a century before. In 1949, Prairie Village was named the best planned community in America by the National Association of Home Builders. It was officially recognized as a city in 1951.[citation needed]

Remnants of the Santa Fe Trail are found in the city.[citation needed]

Shawnee, Osage, and Kansa Indians formerly owned the land now developed into the City of Prairie Village. As settlers and pioneers headed west, one family decided to make Prairie Village their home. In 1858, Thomas Porter bought 160 acres of farmland. Porter’s children were all raised on this farmland and were engaged in agricultural development and civic affairs.

It wasn’t just the Porter family who helped to make Prairie Village home. Porter’s sister, Betty Porter, married Thompson A. Lewis who owned 80 acres between Mission and Roe. Henry Coppock arrived in Johnson County, in 1857, before heading further west to work in freighting and farming. He came back in the mid-1860s and bought land in 1865. Coppock built his family home on 900 acres in Prairie Village. Coppocks’s home stood for 30 years. Now on his land is Homestead County Club.

The original Prairie School was built in 1882 and a new building was constructed in 1912. This landmark was a community treasure until 1990.

In the 1940s, J.C. Nichols, an experienced developer, wanted to turn the farmland into suburban housing for soldiers returning home from the war. Nichols bought the farmland from the Porters, Coppocks, and Lewises. There were hurdles along the way including a lack of experienced builders post World War II, but this didn’t stop Nichols from pursuing his goal.

Prairie Village continued to expand as the Prairie Village Shopping Center opened in 1947 and the Corinth Square Shopping Center opened in 1955.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1960 25,356
1970 28,378 11.9%
1980 24,657 −13.1%
1990 23,186 −6.0%
2000 22,072 −4.8%
2010 21,447 −2.8%
Est. 2014 21,877 [7] 2.0%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 21,447 people, 9,771 households, and 5,816 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,459.2 inhabitants per square mile (1,335.6/km2). There were 10,227 housing units at an average density of 1,649.5 per square mile (636.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 95.3% White, 1.0% African American, 0.2% Native American, 1.4% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.4% of the population.

There were 9,771 households. 26.3% had children under the age of 18, 48.8% were married couples living together, 8.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 40.5% were non-families. 34.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.9% had someone living alone aged 65 years or older. The average household size was 2.18 and the average family size was 2.82.

The median age in the city was 41.4 years. 21% of residents were under the age of 18; 5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.4% were from 25 to 44; 27.7% were from 45 to 64; and 17.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.5% male and 53.5% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 22,072 people, 9,833 households, and 6,165 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,547.1 people per square mile (1,370.1/km²). There were 10,126 housing units at an average density of 1,627.3 per square mile (628.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.15% White, 0.78% African American, 0.16% Native American, 1.13% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.64% from other races, and 1.11% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.27% of the population.

There were 9,833 households. 26.6% had children under the age of 18, 52.8% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.3% were non-families. 32.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.23 and the average family size was 2.84.

In the city the population was spread out with 22.2% under the age of 18, 4.6% from 18 to 24, 29.6% from 25 to 44, 24.0% from 45 to 64, and 19.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 85.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.2 males.

As of 2000 the median income for a household in the city was $58,685, and the median income for a family was $70,602 (these figures had risen to $71,646 and $88,185 respectively as of a 2007 estimate[8]). Males had a median income of $50,428 versus $37,321 for females. The per capita income for the city was $34,677. About 1.4% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.6% of those under age 18 and 2.5% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Public education in Prairie Village is administered by the Shawnee Mission School District For middle school students attend Indian Hills Middle School, whose mascot is the Knight. For high school students are directed to Shawnee Mission East High School. Students seeking a private school education may attend The Pembroke Hill School or Rockhurst High School or Kansas City Christian School.

Libraries[edit]

The Johnson County Library serves residents of Prairie Village. The library's Corinth branch is in Prairie Village.

Sister cities[edit]

Notable people[edit]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-29. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "2010 City Population and Housing Occupancy Status". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved March 6, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  8. ^ "American FactFinder Income Data". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved March 6, 2011. 
  9. ^ Rule, Ann (1997). Bitter Harvest. New York: Simon & Schuster. p. 351. ISBN 0-684-81047-6. 

External links[edit]

City
Maps