Pray TV

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This article is about a 1980 comedy film, also known as KGOD. For the 1982 made-for-television drama, see Pray TV (1982 film). For the actual radio station with these call letters, see KGOD-LP.
Pray TV
Pray TV.jpg
DVD cover
Directed by Rick Friedberg
Produced by
Written by
Starring
Music by George S. Clinton
Production
company
Distributed by Filmways Pictures
Release dates
  • 1980 (1980)
Country United States
Language English

Pray TV (also known as KGOD)[1] is a 1980 comedy film spoofing televangelism.

Plot[edit]

Failing UHF TV station KRUD, Channel 17, is "reborn" as Christian television station KGOD. The new format is a big success but attracts an incompatible mix of fringe ministries and broadcasters wanting time on the station. A series of humorous vignettes show the different religious shows the station broadcasts: a faith healer, a radical black nationalist preacher, a preacher with a drive-in church, a Christian game show, etc.

The film is very similar in both plot and style to the film UHF which was released in 1989.[2][3]

Production[edit]

Pray TV stars Dabney Coleman, Paul Cooper, Rosemary Alexander, and Lewis Arquette, with cameos by Paul Reubens and the band Devo (who play a Christian rock band named "Dove"). It was directed by Rick Friedberg.

Release[edit]

Pray TV was picked up by Filmways Pictures in 1980 (under its original name, KGOD).[4] The film premiered on television instead of theatrically,[5] and aired on Showtime in 1983 under its present title.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Associated Press (AP) (June 5, 1983). "Being Nice Didn't Get Coleman Where He Is". The Victoria Advocate. p. 9TV. Retrieved November 14, 2011. 
  2. ^ David Nusair, "Six Comedy Cult Classics from MGM", reelfilm.com, November 2005
  3. ^ Scott Weinberg, "Pray TV", DVD Talk, November 15, 2005
  4. ^ "Acquisitions (p. 26); No title available (p. 41)". Film Bulletin. Vol. 49. Wax Publications. 1980. p. 26, 41. Retrieved November 14, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Pray TV". VideoHound's Golden Movie Retriever 1997. Visible Ink Press/Gale/Cengage Learning. 1996. p. xiii. ISBN 0-7876-0780-0. Retrieved November 14, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Television movies". The Telegraph-Herald. March 18, 1983. p. 19 (Entertainment Section). Retrieved November 14, 2011. 

External links[edit]