Presidency of Benigno Aquino III

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Aquino in 2010
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Benigno Aquino III


President of the Philippines


Policies



Senator of the Philippines


Member of the House of Representatives from Tarlac's 2nd district

Nonoy Aquino Signature.svg
Seal of the President of the Philippines.svg

The Presidency of Benigno S. Aquino III, also known as Benigno Aquino III Administration, began at noon on June 30, 2010, when he became the fifteenth President of the Philippines, succeeding Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo. Aquino is the third-youngest person to be elected president, and the fourth-youngest president after Emilio Aguinaldo, Ramon Magsaysay and Ferdinand Marcos.[1] Aquino is the first president to be a bachelor, being unmarried and having no children.[1] Aquino is the second president not to drink alcoholic beverages; the first president not to drink alcohol was Emilio Aguinaldo.[1] Aquino is the eighth president to be a smoker.[1] Aquino is the first graduate of Ateneo de Manila University to become president.[1] Aquino is the third president who will only hold office in Malacañan Palace, but not be a resident, following Corazon Aquino and Fidel V. Ramos.[1] Aquino is the first president to make Bahay Pangarap his official residence.[2][3] Aquino is the third president to use his second given name, Simeon, as his middle initial, as Manuel L. Quezon and José P. Laurel did.[4][1][5] Aquino is the second president to be a child of a former president, his mother was former President Corazon Aquino; the first president to be a child of a former president was President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, who is the daughter of former President Diosdado Macapagal.

Transition[edit]

The presidential transition began on June 9, 2010, when the Congress of the Philippines proclaimed Aquino the winner of the 2010 Philippine presidential elections held on May 10, 2010, proclaiming Aquino as the President-elect of the Philippines.[6][7] The transition was in charge of the new presidential residence, cabinet appointments and cordial meetings between them and the outgoing administration.

Official residence[edit]

The presidential residence of Aquino is Bahay Pangarap (English: House of Aspiration),[8] located inside of Malacañang Park,[9] at the headquarters of the Presidential Security Group across the Pasig River from Malacañan Palace.[8][10] Aquino is the first president to make Bahay Pangarap his official residence.[2][3] Malacañang Park was intended as a recreational retreat by former President Manuel L. Quezon.[3] The house was built and designed by architect Juan M. Arellano in the 1930s,[3][8] and underwent a number of renovations.[8] In 2008, the house was demolished and rebuilt in contemporary style by architect Conrad Onglao,[3][8] a new swimming pool was built, replacing the Commonwealth-era swimming pool.[2][3] The house originally had one bedroom,[8] however, the house was renovated for Aquino to have four bedrooms,[2] a guest room, a room for Aquino's household staff, and a room for Aquino's close-in security.[9] The house was originally intended as a rest house, the venue for informal activities and social functions for the First Family by former President Manuel L. Quezon.[8] Malacañang Park was refurbished through the efforts of First Lady Eva Macapagal, wife of former President Diosdado Macapagal, in the early 1960s.[3] First Lady Macapagal renamed the rest house as Bahay Pangarap.[3] During the presidency of Fidel V. Ramos, the house was restored and became the club house of the Malacañang Golf Club.[8] The house was used by former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo to welcome special guests.[8] Aquino refused to live in Malacañan Palace, the official residence of the President of the Philippines, or in Arlegui Mansion, the residence of former presidents Corazon Aquino and Fidel V. Ramos, stating that the two residences are too big,[8] and also stated that his small family residence at Times Street in Quezon City would be impractical, since it would be a security concern for his neighbors.[10]

Inauguration[edit]

Traditionally, it is the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the Philippines who administers the oath of office to the incoming President and Vice President, however, Aquino refused to allow Chief Justice Renato Corona to swear him into office, due to Aquino's opposition to the midnight appointment of Corona by outgoing President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo on May 12, 2010, two days after the 2010 elections and a month before Arroyo's term expires.[11] Instead, Aquino formally requested Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the Philippines Conchita Carpio-Morales, who opposed the midnight appointment of Corona,[12] to swear him into office.[13]

Aquino took the oath of office on June 30, 2010, at the Quirino Grandstand in Rizal Park, Manila.[5][14] The oath of office was administered by Associate Justice Conchita Carpio-Morales, who officially accepted Aquino's request to swear him into office,[5][13] reminiscent of the decision of his mother, who in 1986, was sworn into the presidency by Associate Justice Claudio Teehankee.[1] After being sworn in as the fifteenth President of the Philippines, succeeding Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, Aquino delivered his inaugural address.

Interim Interior Secretary[edit]

On June 29, 2010, Aquino officially named the members of his Cabinet, with Aquino himself as Secretary of the Interior and Local Government,[15] a position that Vice President-elect Jejomar Binay initially wanted, however, Aquino stated that the post is not being considered for him,[16] but has offered Binay various positions, such as, to head a commission that will investigate the outgoing Arroyo administration, the posts of Secretary of Agrarian Reform, chairman of the Housing and Urban Development Coordinating Council (HUDCC), and the chairman of Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA), but Binay refused.[17] However, on July 15, 2010, Binay has accepted the offer of Aquino to take charge of the housing sector as chairman of HUDCC.[18]

From June 30–July 9, 2010, Aquino was Secretary of the Interior and Local Government,[15] until Aquino named Jesse Robredo, a former Naga mayor, as acting Interior Secretary.[19]

Major issues of presidency[edit]

Aquino's speeches[edit]

Major acts as president[edit]

Major legislation signed[edit]

  • R.A # 10149 - GOCC Governance Act of 2011
  • R.A # 10157 - Kindergarden Education Act of 2012
  • R.A # 10173 - Data Privacy Act of 2012
  • R.A # 10175 - Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012
  • R.A # 10349 - Revised AFP Modernization Act of 2012
  • R.A # 10353 - Anti-Enforced or Involuntary Disappearance Act of 2012
  • R.A # 10354 - Responsible Parenthood and Reproductive Health Act of 2012
  • R.A # 10361 - Domestic Workers Act of 2012
  • R.A # 10364 - Expanded Anti-Trafficking in Persons Act of 2012
  • R.A # 10365 - Amendments to the Anti-Money Laundering Act (AMLA)
  • R.A # 10368 - Human Rights Victims Reparation and Recognition Act of 2013
  • R.A # 10374 - Exemption of foreign carriers from the Common Carriers Tax (CCT)
  • R.A # 10378 - Act recognizing the principle of reciprocity as basis for the grant of income tax exemptions to international carriers
  • R.A # 10380 - Act Providing for Local Absentee Voting for Media
  • R.A # 10390 - Act of Revitalizing the People's Television Network
  • R.A # 10533 - Enhanced Basic Education Act of 2013
  • R.A. # 10535 - Philippine Standard Time Act of 2013
  • R.A # 10557 - Philippine Design Competitiveness Act of 2013
  • R.A # 10575 - Bureau of Corrections Act of 2013
  • R.A # 10586 - Anti-Drunk and Drugged Act of 2013
  • R.A # 10588 - Palarong Pambansa Act of 2013
  • R.A # 10591 - Comprehensive Firearms and Ammunition Regulation Act of 2013
  • R.A # 10627 - Anti-Bullying Act of 2013
  • R.A # 10632 - Act to postpone the Sangguniang Kabataan Elections
  • R.A # 10639 - Free Mobile Disaster Alerts Act of 2014
  • R.A # 10642 - Philippine Lemon Law of 2014
  • R.A # 10643 - Graphic Health Warnings Law of 2014
  • R.A # 10644 - Go Negosyo Act of 2014
  • R.A # 10647 - Ladderized Education Act of 2014
  • R.A # 10648 - Iskolar ng Bayan Act of 2014
  • R.A # 10650 - Open Distance Learning Act
  • R.A # 10657 - Chemistry Profession Act
  • R.A # 10659 - Sugarcane Industry Development Act of 2015
  • R.A # 10661 - National Children’s Month
  • R.A # 10665 - Open High School System Act
  • R.A # 10666 - Children’s Safety on Motorcycles Act of 2015
  • R.A # 10667 - Philippine Competition Act
  • R.A # 10676 - Student-Athletes Protection Act
  • R.A # 10679 - Youth Entrepreneurship Act
  • R.A # 10687 - UniFAST Act
  • R.A # 10688 - Metallurgical Engineering Act of 2015
  • R.A # 10690 - Forestry Profession Act
  • R.A # 10692 - PAGASA Modernization Act of 2015
  • R.A # 10693 - Microfinance NGOs Act
  • R.A # 10697 - Strategic Trade Management Act
  • R.A # 10698 - Naval Architecture Law
  • R.A # 10699 - National Athletes and Coaches Benefits and Incentives Act
  • R.A # 10706 - Seafarers Protection Act
  • R.A # 10708 - Tax Incentives Management and Transparency Act
  • R.A # 10742 - Sangguniang Kabataan Reform Act of 2015
  • R.A # 10744 - Credit Surety Fund Cooperative Act of 2015
  • R.A # 10747 - Rare Diseases Act of the Philippines
  • R.A # 10752 - The Right-of-Way Act
  • R.A # 10756 - Election Service Reform Act
  • R.A # 10767 - Comprehensive Tuberculosis Elimination Plan Act
  • R.A # 10771 - Philippine Green Jobs Act of 2016
  • R.A # 10801 - Overseas Workers Welfare Administration Act
  • R.A # 10816 - Farm Tourism Development Act of 2016
  • R.A # 10817 - Philippine Halal Export Development and Promotion Act of 2016
  • R.A # 10821 - Children’s Emergency Relief and Protection Act of 2016
  • R.A # 10844 - Creating the Department of Information and Communications Technology
  • R.A # 10845 - Anti-Agricultural Smuggling Act of 2016
  • R.A # 10862 - Nutrition and Dietetics Law of 2016
  • R.A # 10863 - Customs Modernization and Tariff Act of 2016
  • R.A # 10867 - NBI Reorganization and Modernization Act
  • R.A # 10868 - Centenarians Act of 2016

Domestic policies[edit]

No ‘wang-wang’ policy[edit]

During the inaugural address, Aquino created the no ‘wang-wang’ policy, strengthening the implementation of Presidential Decree No. 96.[20][21] The term ‘wang-wang’ is a street lingo for blaring sirens.[22] Presidential Decree No. 96 was issued on January 13, 1973 by former President Ferdinand Marcos, regulating the use of sirens, bells, whistles, horns and other similar devices only to motor vehicles designated for the use of the President, Vice President, Senate President, House Speaker, Chief Justice, Philippine National Police, Armed Forces of the Philippines, National Bureau of Investigation, Land Transportation Office, Bureau of Fire Protection and ambulances.[20][21] However, despite having the privilege of using ‘wang-wang’, Aquino maintained he would set the example for his no ‘wang-wang’ policy, not to use ‘wang-wang’, even if it means being stuck in traffic and being late every now and then.[23][24] Aquino also traded the official black presidential Mercedes Benz S-Guard limousine for a white Toyota Land Cruiser 200.[23] After the inaugural address, the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority began to enforce Aquino's no ‘wang-wang’ policy, confiscating ‘wang-wang’ from public officials and private motorists who illegally used them.[21]

Formation of a truth commission[edit]

On June 29, 2010, Aquino announced the formation of a truth commission that will investigate various issues including corruption allegations against outgoing President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo. Aquino named former Chief Justice Hilario Davide, Jr. to head the truth commission.[25] However, the Supreme Court struck down the said commission because it "violates the equal protection clause of the constitution".

Executive orders[edit]

On July 30, 2010, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 1, creating the Truth Commission.[26] The commission is tasked to investigate various anomalies and issues including graft and corruption allegations against the past administration, government officials and their accomplices in the private sector during the last nine years.[26] The commission has until December 31, 2012 to complete its mission.[26] Chief Justice Hilario Davide, Jr. will head the commission.[26]

On August 4, 2010, Aquino implemented Executive Order No. 2, signed on July 30, 2010, ordering the immediate removal of all midnight appointments made by the previous administration for violating the 60-day constitutional ban on presidential appointments before a national election.[27]

On August 6, 2010, Aquino implemented Executive Order No. 3, signed on July 30, 2010, an executive order revoking Executive Order No. 883, signed by former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo on May 28, 2010, that automatically promoted lawyers in government executive service to the rank of Career Executive Service Officer III (CESO III).[28]

On August 9, 2010, Aquino implemented Executive Order No. 4, signed on July 30, 2010, reorganizing and renaming the Office of the Press Secretary as the Presidential Communications Operations Office (PCOO),[29][30] and creating the Presidential Communications Development and Strategic Planning Office (PCDSPO).[29][30] Aquino appointed former ABS-CBN News Channel (ANC) anchor Ricky Carandang and Herminio Coloma as secretaries of the new media communications group.[30][31]

On September 1, 2010, Aquino implemented Executive Order No. 5, signed on August 25, 2010, an executive order amending Executive Order No. 594, signed by former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo on December 20, 2006, stating the rules governing the appointment or designation and conduct of special envoys.[32] Executive Order No. 5 prevents special envoys from using the title "ambassador".[32]

On September 2, 2010, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 6, extending the duration of the operations of the Presidential Middle East Preparedness Committee (PMEPC) to December 30, 2010.[33]

On September 8, 2010, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 7, ordering the suspension of all allowances, bonuses and incentives of board members of government-owned and-controlled corporations (GOCCs) and government financial institutions (GFIs) until December 31, 2010.[34]

On September 9, 2010, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 8, reorganizing and renaming the Build-Operate and Transfer Center (BOT) to the Public-Private Partnership Center (PPP) and transferring its attachment from the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) to the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA).[35]

On October 1, 2010, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 9, amending Section 1 of Executive Order No. 67, signed by former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo on January 22, 2002, and reorganizing the Presidential Commission on the Visiting Forces Agreement created under Executive Order No. 199, signed by former President Joseph Estrada on January 17, 2000.

On October 2, 2010, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 10, declaring October 2, 2010 as the Nationwide Philhealth Registration Day (NPRD) and directing the Department of Health (DOH) to lead concerned government agencies to facilitate the nationwide Philhealth registration.

On November 8, 2010, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 11, transferring the National Commission on Indigenous Peoples from the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) to the Office of the President.

On November 9, 2010, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 12, delegating to the Executive Secretary the power to approve compromises or releases of any interest, penalty or civil liability to the Social Security System (SSS) pursuant to Section 4(6) of Republic Act No. 8282, otherwise known as the Social Security Act of 1997.

On November 15, 2010, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 13, abolishing the Presidential Anti-Graft Commission (PAGC) and transferring its investigative, adjudicatory and recommendatory functions to the Office of the Deputy Executive Secretary for Legal Affairs and the Office of the President.

On November 19, 2010, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 14, transferring the control and supervision of the Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office (PCSO) from the Department of Health (DOH) to the Office of the President.

On December 9, 2010, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 18, abolishing agencies under the Office of the President such as the Presidential Anti-Smuggling Group (PASG) and the Office of the Presidential Adviser on Global Warming and Climate Change.

On December 20, 2010, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 15, granting combat allowance to uniformed members of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) who are directly involved in combat operations against members of National Security Threat Groups.

On December 21, 2010, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 16, extending the term of the SOCCSKSARGEN Area Development Office (ADPO) from January 2010 to December 2016.

On December 22, 2010, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 17, forming the EDSA People Power Commission, designated to organize the nationwide celebrations commemorating the 25th anniversary of the 1986 People Power Revolution.

On December 30, 2010, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 19, extending the suspension of the grant of allowances and other incentives to members of the Board of Directors/Trustees of Government-Owned and Controlled Corporations (GOCCs) and Government Financial Institutions (GFIs).

On January 6, 2011, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 20, extending the duration of operation of the Presidential Middle East Preparedness Committee (PMECC), led by Special Envoy Roy Cimatu, to June 30, 2011.

On January 14, 2011, Aquino signed Executive Orders No. 21 and 22, reducing the rate of import duty on milling wheat, cement and cement clinker to zero under Section 104 of the Presidential Decree No. 1464, otherwise as the Tariff and Customs Code of 1978.[36]

On February 1, 2011, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 23, declaring a moratorium on the cutting and harvesting of timber in the natural and residual forests and creating the Anti-Illegal Logging Task Force.

On February 10, 2011, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 24, which prescribed rules to govern the compensation of members of the Board of Directors/Trustees in Government-Owned Controlled Corporations (GOCCs) and Government Financial Institutions (GFIs).

On February 24, 2011, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 26, declaring the implementation of a National Greening Program (NGP). The NGP will plant some 1.5 billion trees covering about 1.5 million hectares for a period of six years, from 2011 to 2016.

On February 28, 2011, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 27, implementing the reduction of real property taxes and interest/penalties assessed on the power generation facilities of independent power producers under build-operate transfer contracts with Government-Owned and Controlled Corporations in Quezon.

On March 14, 2011, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 28, reorganizing the Single Negotiating Panel into the Philippine Air Negotiating Panel and the Philippine Air Consultation Panel, mandated by the Philippine government's Domestic and International Civil Aviation Liberalization Policy.

On March 14, 2011, Aquino signed Executive Order No. 29, authorizing the Civil Aeronautics Board and the Philippine Air Panels to "pursue more aggressively" the International Civil Aviation Liberalization Policy.

On March 14, 2011, Aquino also signed Executive Order No. 30, transferring the Land Registration Authority (LRA) from the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) to the Department of Justice (DOJ).

Hourly broadcast of original Filipino musical compositions on radio[edit]

On August 14, 2010, Aquino directed the Department of Transportation and Communications (DOTC) and the National Telecommunications Commission (NTC) to fully implement Executive Order No. 255, issued on July 25, 1987 by former President Corazon Aquino, requiring all radio stations to broadcast a minimum of four original Filipino musical compositions every hour.[37]

Launch of official presidential website[edit]

On August 16, 2010, Aquino launches his official presidential website. The presidential website's aim is to create communication between Aquino and the people, getting feedback from the people, telling Aquino their woes and grievances.[38]

PAGASA ‘Reorientation’[edit]

On July 14, 2010, the National Disaster Coordinating Council (NDCC) called an emergency meeting in Camp Aguinaldo to assess the damage caused by Typhoon Basyang.[39] Aquino attended the meeting to obtain information on the damage caused by Typhoon Basyang and to personally monitor the repair and recovery work in the aftermath of the typhoon.[39] In the meeting, Aquino criticized the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) for failing to predict and to warn the residents of Metro Manila that Typhoon Basyang would ravage Metropolitan Manila.[39][40]

On August 6, 2010, Aquino announced the removal of Prisco Nilo as administrator of PAGASA.[41] PAGASA was directly under Department of Science and Technology (DOST) Undersecretary for Research and Development (R&D) Graciano Yumul.[41] A special order from DOST Secretary Mario Montejo, dated August 5, 2010, designated Yumul as PAGASA administrator, replacing Nilo.[41] On August 7, 2010, Malacañang announced that Yumul will be heading PAGASA temporarily, for only three months, as PAGASA will undergo a "reorientation" to improve its services.[42] Aquino has yet to name the new administrator who will permanently head PAGASA.[42]

Education reform[edit]

During Aquino's first State of the Nation Address (SONA), Aquino announced his intention to reform the education system in the Philippines by shifting to K–12 education, a 12-year basic education cycle.[43] K–12 education is used in the United States, Canada, and Australia.

Reproductive health[edit]

On September 30, 2010, Bishop Nereo Odchimar of Tandag, head of the Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines (CBCP), said that Aquino might face excommunication from the Catholic Church for supporting the Reproductive Health Bill, the plan to distribute and give Filipino couples the choice to use contraceptives for artificial birth control.[44] However, despite the possibility of excommunication, Aquino said that he is not changing his position on contraceptive use.[44] In January 2013, Aquino signed legislation which funds contraceptives for poor individuals; the law has been challenged in the Philippine Supreme Court.[45]

Foreign policies[edit]

First official trip to the United States[edit]

United States President Barack Obama with President Benigno Aquino III at a working lunch with leaders of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations around the United Nations General Assembly Meeting in New York City.
United States Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivers remarks at the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) compact agreement signing ceremony with President Benigno S. Aquino III at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City, on September 23, 2010.

On September 20, 2010, Aquino delivered his departure statement at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA), before leaving for his first official trip to the United States.[46] Secretary of Foreign Affairs Alberto Romulo, Secretary of Finance Cesar Purisima, Secretary of Trade & Industry Gregory Domingo, and Secretary of Energy Jose Rene Almendras, including 34 businessmen and 12 officials and support staff of the Presidential Communications Operations Office joined Aquino in the trip.[46] On September 28, 2010, Aquino arrived at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA), after his week-long working visit to the United States.[47] Aquino delivered his arrival statement at NAIA.[47]

Citibank Economic Conference[edit]

On September 22, 2010, Aquino delivered his speech during the Citibank Economic Conference in New York City.

Meeting with the Filipino community in the United States[edit]

On September 23, 2010, Aquino delivered his extemporaneous remarks during a meeting with the Filipino community at Baruch College in New York City.

On September 26, 2010, during a visit to the Seasons Market Place in Milpitas, California, Aquino was greeted by cheering members of the Filipino community of San Jose, California.[48] Aquino also delivered his speech in front of the Filipino community at the Mission San Francisco de Asís in San Francisco, California.

Millennium Challenge Corporation[edit]

On September 23, 2010, Aquino delivered his remarks at the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) compact agreement signing ceremony at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City. The US$434-million MCC compact agreement will fund the Aquino administration's various programs on poverty reduction, revenue generation, and infrastructure development.[46]

Statement before the 65th United Nations General Assembly[edit]

On September 24, 2010, Aquino delivered his statement before the 65th United Nations General Assembly in New York City.

Meeting with Obama[edit]

On September 24, 2010, Aquino had a seven-minute one-on-one talk with President of the United States Barack Obama during the 2nd Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN)-US Leaders Meeting at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City.[49][50] During the meeting, Aquino recognized the United States’ commitment to reinvigorating its relationship with the region and its individual nations at a time of ever-increasing complexity in global affairs.[49] Obama expressed his determination to elevate RP-US relations to a higher level, and welcomed the Aquino administration’s anti-corruption efforts.[49] Aquino and Obama also discussed military matters, about the possible removal of thousands of tons of war materials that Allied forces had left behind on Corregidor Island during World War II.[50]

First official trip to Vietnam[edit]

President Benigno Aquino III (3rd to the right) and other ASEAN leaders during the 2nd ASEAN-Russia Summit, Hanoi, Vietnam, October 30, 2010.

On October 26, 2010, Aquino delivered his departure statement at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA), before leaving for his first official trip to Vietnam.[51] On October 31, 2010, Aquino arrived at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA), after his first official trip to Vietnam.[52] Aquino delivered his arrival statement at NAIA.[52]

Meeting with the President and Prime Minister of Vietnam[edit]

On October 26, 2010, Aquino met with President of Vietnam Nguyễn Minh Triết at the Presidential Palace in Hanoi, Vietnam.[51] Aquino and Triết signed four memorandum of agreement on four areas of cooperation, namely, higher education, defense, oil spill preparedness and response, and search and rescue at sea.[51] Aquino also met with Prime Minister of Vietnam Nguyễn Tấn Dũng.[51] Aquino delivered a toast at the State Banquet hosted by Triết at the Government Guest House.

Meeting with the Filipino community in Vietnam[edit]

On October 27, 2010, Aquino delivered his extemporaneous remarks during a meeting with the Filipino community in Vietnam.

Statements during the ASEAN Summits in Vietnam[edit]

On October 28, 2010, Aquino delivered his statement during the ASEAN Leaders’ Retreat in Hanoi, Vietnam. On October 29, 2010, Aquino delivered his statements during the 13th ASEAN-Japan Summit, 13th ASEAN-Republic of Korea Summit, 13th ASEAN-China Summit, 13th ASEAN Plus Three Summit, and 3rd ASEAN-UN Summit in Hanoi, Vietnam. On October 30, 2010, Aquino delivered his statements during the 8th ASEAN-India Summit, 5th East Asia Summit, 2nd ASEAN-Russia Summit, ASEAN-Australia Summit, and ASEAN-New Zealand Commemorative Summit in Hanoi, Vietnam.

First official trip to Japan[edit]

On November 11, 2010, Aquino delivered his departure statement at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA), before leaving for his first official trip to Japan for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Summit in Yokohama, Japan.[53]

APEC CEO Summit[edit]

On November 12, 2010, Aquino delivered his speech during the APEC CEO Summit in Yokohama, Japan.

APEC Economic Leaders Meeting Retreat[edit]

On November 14, 2010, Aquino delivered his statement during the APEC Economic Leaders Meeting Retreat in Yokohama, Japan.

2013 Midterm Elections[edit]

Legislative and local elections were held in the Philippines on May 13, 2013. Positions contested included half the seats in the Senate of the Philippines, which are elected for six-year terms, and all the seats in the House of Representatives of the Philippines, who were elected for three-year terms. The duly elected legislators of the 2013 elections joined the elected senators of the 2010 elections to comprise the 16th Congress of the Philippines. Aquino's Team PNoy coalition won 9 senate seats and 112 seats in the house.

Manila hostage crisis[edit]

On August 23, 2010, in front of the Quirino Grandstand in Rizal Park, Manila, the site of Aquino's presidential inauguration, the Manila hostage crisis occurred. Aquino expressed concern over the matter and gave his condolences to the victims. Aquino defended the actions of the police at the scene, stating that the gunman had not shown any signs of wanting to kill the hostages.[54] Aquino ordered a "thorough investigation" into the incident, and would wait until it is completed before deciding whether anyone should lose his or her job.[54][55] Aquino declared that the media may have worsened the situation by giving the gunman "a bird's-eye view of the entire situation".[55] Aquino also made reference to the Moscow theater hostage crisis, which, according to Aquino, resulted in "more severe" casualties despite Russia's "resources and sophistication".[56] On August 24, 2010, Aquino signed Proclamation No. 23, declaring August 25, 2010, as a national day of mourning, instructing all public institutions nationwide and all Philippine embassies and consulates overseas to lower the Philippine flag at half-mast, in honor of the eight Hong Kong residents who died in the Manila hostage crisis.[57][58] On August 27, 2010, at a press conference in Malacañang, Aquino apologized to those offended when he was caught on television apparently smiling while being interviewed at the crime scene hours after the Manila hostage crisis.[59] Aquino said;

"My smile might have been misunderstood. I have several expressions. I smile when I'm happy, I smile when I'm faced with a very absurd situation... and if I offended certain people, I apologize to them. It's more of an expression maybe of exasperation rather than anything and again, I apologize if I offended certain people, who misunderstood (my) facial expression."[59]

On September 3, 2010, Aquino took responsibility for everything that happened during the Manila hostage crisis.[60] Aquino actually has direct supervision of the Philippine National Police, since Aquino had asked Secretary of the Interior and Local Government Jesse Robredo to address other concerns, such as coming up with a comprehensive plan on delivering social services to and relocating informal settlers in coordination with the local governments.[60]

Administration and cabinet[edit]

OFFICE NAME TERM
President Benigno S. Aquino III June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Vice President Jejomar C. Binay June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Cabinet Secretary Jose Rene Almendras November 5, 2012 – March 8, 2016
Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa, Jr. June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Press Secretary Edwin Lacierda June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Chief of the Presidential Management Staff Julia Abad June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Deputy Presidential Spokesperson Abigail Valte June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Presidential Communications Development and Strategic Planning Ricky Carandang July 30, 2010 – December 31, 2013
Manuel Quezon III January 1, 2014 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of the Presidential Communications Operations Office Dr. Herminio "Sonny" Coloma, Jr. June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Director-General of the
National Economic and Development Authority
Cayetano Paderanga, Jr. August 3, 2010 – May 10, 2012
Arsenio Balisacan May 10, 2012 – January 24, 2016
Emmanuel Esguerra February 1, 2016 – June 30, 2016
Presidential Assistant for Rehabilitation and Recovery Ret. P/Dir. Gen. Panfilo Lacson, PNP December 10, 2013 – February 10, 2015
Presidential Assistant for Food Security and Agriculture Modernization Francis Pangilinan May 6, 2014 – September 15, 2015
Fredelita Guiza September 16, 2015 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Agrarian Reform Virgilio de los Reyes June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Agriculture Proceso Alcala June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Budget and Management Florencio Abad June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Education Br. Armin Luistro FSC June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Energy Jose Rene Almendras June 30, 2010 – November 4, 2012
Carlos Jericho Petilla November 5, 2012 – April 30, 2015
Zenaida Monsada* July 2, 2015 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Environment and Natural Resources Ramon Paje June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Finance Cesar Purisima* ‡ June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Foreign Affairs Alberto Romulo June 30, 2010 – February 23, 2011
Albert del Rosario February 24, 2011 – March 7, 2016
Jose Rene Almendras
(in acting capacity)
March 8, 2016 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Health Dr. Enrique Ona* ‡ June 30, 2010 – December 19, 2014
Dr. Janette Garin February 17, 2015 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of the Interior and Local Government Benigno Aquino III
(in concurrent capacity as President)
June 30, 2010 – July 9, 2010
Jesse M. Robredo July 9, 2010 – August 18, 2012
Paquito Ochoa, Jr.
(in acting capacity)
August 21, 2012 – September 19, 2012
Mar Roxas September 20, 2012 – September 10, 2015
Mel Senen Sarmiento September 11, 2015 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Justice Leila de Lima* ‡ June 30, 2010 – October 12, 2015
Alfredo Benjamin Caguioa October 12, 2015 – January 21, 2016
Emmanuel Caparas(Acting) January 22, 2016 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Labor and Employment Rosalinda Baldoz* ‡ June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of National Defense Ret. Lt. Gen. Voltaire Gazmin, PA June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Public Works and Highways Rogelio Singson June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Science and Technology Engr. Mario Montejo June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Social Welfare and Development Corazon Soliman June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Tourism Alberto Lim June 30, 2010 – August 12, 2011
Ramon Jimenez, Jr. September 1, 2011 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Trade and Industry Gregory Domingo June 30, 2010 – December 31, 2015
Adrian S. Cristobal Jr. January 1, 2016 – June 30, 2016
Secretary of Transportation and Communications Jose de Jesus June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2011
Mar Roxas July 4, 2011 – October 18, 2012
Joseph Emilio Abaya October 18, 2012 – June 30, 2016
National Security Adviser Cesar Garcia July 9, 2010 – June 30, 2016
Presidential Adviser on Peace Process Teresita Deles June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
CHED Chairman Dr. Patricia Licuanan June 30, 2010 – June 30, 2016
AFP Chief of Staff Gen. Ricardo David June 30, 2010 – March 8, 2011
Gen. Eduardo Oban Jr. March 8, 2011 – December 12, 2011
Gen. Jessie Dellosa December 12, 2011 – January 17, 2013
Gen. Emmanuel T. Bautista January 17, 2013 – July 18, 2014
Gen. Gregorio Pio Catapang July 18, 2014 – July 10, 2015
Gen. Hernando Iriberri July 10, 2015 – April 22, 2016
Lt. Gen. Glorioso Miranda (Acting) April 22, 2016 – June 30, 2016
PNP Director General Dir. Gen. Raul Bacalzo September 14, 2010 – September 9, 2011
Dir. Gen. Nicanor Bartolome September 9, 2011 – December 17, 2012
Dir. Gen. Alan Purisima December 17, 2012 – February 5, 2015
Dep. Dir. Gen. Leonardo Espina (OIC) February 5, 2015 – July 16, 2015
Dir. Gen. Ricardo Marquez July 16, 2015 – June 30, 2016
  • *Retained from previous administration
  • ‡Promoted from lower office(s)

Source: malacanang.gov.ph[61]

Judicial appointments[edit]

Aquino appointed the following to the Supreme Court of the Philippines:

  1. Chief Justice Maria Lourdes Sereno - August 13, 2010 (August 25, 2012 as Chief Justice).[62]
  2. Justice Bienvenido L. Reyes - August 20, 2011
  3. Justice Estela Perlas-Bernabe - September 16, 2011
  4. Justice Marvic Leonen - November 21, 2012
  5. Justice Francis Jardeleza - August 19, 2014
  6. Justice Alfredo Benjamin Caguioa - January 22, 2016 (his last SC justice appointee)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Trivia on Aquino and Binay". ABS-CBN News. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Bahay Pangarap for P-Noy ready". 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h "Briefer on Bahay Pangarap and Malacañang Park". 
  4. ^ "Senator Benigno S. Aquino III". Senate of the Philippines. Retrieved January 25, 2010. 
  5. ^ a b c "Official Program Aquino Inaugural (Excerpts)". 
  6. ^ "Congress final tallies – INQUIRER.net, Philippine News for Filipinos". 
  7. ^ "Aquino promises justice as Philippines president - Yahoo! News". 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Bahay Pangarap: Aquino's future home?". 
  9. ^ a b "How was PNoy’s first night at Bahay Pangarap?". 
  10. ^ a b "Noynoy's new home is Bahay Pangarap". 
  11. ^ "No Corona-tion for Noynoy - INQUIRER.net, Philippine News for Filipinos". 
  12. ^ "G.R. No. 191002". 
  13. ^ a b "Lady justice to administer Aquino oath - INQUIRER.net, Philippine News for Filipinos". 
  14. ^ "Noynoy Aquino to take oath at the Luneta grandstand - Nation - GMANews.TV - Official Website of GMA News and Public Affairs - Latest Philippine News". 
  15. ^ a b Ager, Maila (June 29, 2010). "Aquino names Tite Cabinet, takes DILG helm". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved June 29, 2010. 
  16. ^ Ager, Maila (June 23, 2010). "Binay meets Aquino, declines Cabinet post". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved June 25, 2010. 
  17. ^ "Binay offered new office to probe Arroyo". ABS-CBN News. June 24, 2010. Retrieved June 25, 2010. 
  18. ^ "VP Binay is new housing czar". 
  19. ^ "Jesse Robredo named DILG chief". 
  20. ^ a b "P. Noy’s ‘wang-wang’ policy sets culture change". 
  21. ^ a b c "MMDA sees positive effect of 'wang-wang' confiscation". 
  22. ^ "Take Two: ‘No wang-wang’". 
  23. ^ a b "No ‘wangwang,’ no limo, Aquino stuck in traffic". 
  24. ^ "P-Noy late again, but no wang-wang policy stays". 
  25. ^ "Davide named Truth Commission chief - INQUIRER.net, Philippine News for Filipinos". 
  26. ^ a b c d "Aquino signs EO on Truth Commission - INQUIRER.net, Philippine News for Filipinos". 
  27. ^ "Aquino fires Arroyo 'midnight appointees'". 
  28. ^ "Aquino revokes Arroyo EO promoting gov't lawyers". 
  29. ^ a b "Aquino officially creates ComGroup". 
  30. ^ a b c "Aquino forms media communications group". 
  31. ^ "Press group reorganized". 
  32. ^ a b "Aquino's EO No. 5: Special envoys can't use 'ambassador' title". 
  33. ^ "Executive Order No. 6". 
  34. ^ "Aquino suspends allowances and bonuses for GOCC execs". 
  35. ^ "Aquino issues EO 8 creating Public-Private Partnership Center". 
  36. ^ "Tariff and Customs Code of the Philippines (1978)". 
  37. ^ "Aquino wants more of Filipino music on radio". 
  38. ^ "Aquino launches presidential website to get feedback from people". 
  39. ^ a b c "Aquino reprimands PAGASA at Typhoon Basyang briefing - Nation - GMANews.TV - Official Website of GMA News and Public Affairs - Latest Philippine News". 
  40. ^ "Aquino raps PAGASA at emergency briefing". 
  41. ^ a b c "Aquino sacks PAGASA chief". 
  42. ^ a b "Malacañang taps Yumul as temporary Pagasa chief". 
  43. ^ "Education in the SONA". 
  44. ^ a b "CBCP head: Aquino might be excommunicated for contraceptive stance". 
  45. ^ "New Law Points Up Church's Waning Influence in Philippines". San Diego Union Tribune. Associated Press. 5 January 2013. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  46. ^ a b c "Aquino leaves for US". 
  47. ^ a b "Back from US, PNoy says 43K jobs to be generated in 3 years". 
  48. ^ "President Aquino and the ecstatic Filipino community of San Jose, California". 
  49. ^ a b c "President Aquino’s one-on-one talk with US President Barack Obama". 
  50. ^ a b "Obama grants Aquino a 7-minute meet in NYC". 
  51. ^ a b c d "Aquino arrives in Vietnam for first state visit". 
  52. ^ a b "Aquino back from ‘successful’ Vietnam visit". 
  53. ^ "Aquino in Japan today for APEC Summit". 
  54. ^ a b "Hong Kong warns against Philippines travel after deaths". BBC News. August 24, 2010. 
  55. ^ a b "Gunman in the Philippines ends standoff by killing 8, wounding 7". CNN. August 24, 2010. 
  56. ^ "Aquino explains his stand on Monday's hostage crisis". 
  57. ^ "Noynoy declares August 25 as Nat'l Day of Mourning". 
  58. ^ "National Day of Mourning declared for slain hostages". 
  59. ^ a b "Aquino says sorry for the ‘smile’". 
  60. ^ a b "Aquino takes responsibility for bus siege tragedy". 
  61. ^ http://malacanang.gov.ph/presidents/fifth-republic/benigno-aquino-iii/
  62. ^ "Aquino names Sereno SC Associate Justice". 

External links[edit]

Media related to Presidency of Benigno Aquino III at Wikimedia Commons

Quotations related to Presidency of Benigno Aquino III at Wikiquote

Philippines Presidential Administrations
Preceded by
Macapagal Arroyo
B.S. Aquino III Presidency
2010–2016
Succeeded by
Duterte