President's Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition

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The President's Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition (PCFSN) is an American government organization that aims to "promote, encourage and motivate Americans of all ages to become physically active and participate in sports."[citation needed] It is part of the Office of Public Health and Science, an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. Prior to June 2010, it was called the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports.

History[edit]

During the 1940s, the American Medical Association and the National Committee on Physical Fitness had a joint committee encouraging physical fitness.[1]

The President's Council on Youth Fitness was founded on July 16, 1956, to encourage American children.[citation needed]

In 1963, President Kennedy changed the council's name to President's Council on Physical Fitness to reflect its role to serve all Americans.[citation needed]

In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson created the Presidential Physical Fitness Award, the name of which was later changed to President's Challenge Youth Physical Fitness Awards Program. In 1968, the council's name was changed to President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports to emphasize the importance of sports in life.[citation needed]

In 1972, the Presidential Sports Award Program was created.[citation needed]

In 1983, the United States Congress declared May as National Physical Fitness and Sports Month.

In 1996, the Surgeon General's Report on Physical Activity and Health was released. In 1997, the Council released its report on Physical Activity and Sport in the Lives of Boys.[citation needed]

In June 2010, President Barack Obama renamed the agency the President's Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition, with a new emphasis on nutrition as an element of fitness.[2] First Lady Michelle Obama announced the new commission's goal "to end the epidemic of childhood obesity in a generation" and also announced that the president had named, as the new co-chairs of the council, New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees and former Olympic gymnast Dominique Dawes.[3][4]

On January 11, 2012, operators of the website for participants of the Challenge and Active Lifestyle programs learned that the site had been hacked, resulting in the release of personal information of the participants.[5] The President's Challenge site displayed a notice that it was down for "Site Maintenance – We're taking a little breather."[6] On January 20, 2012, the site was modified to explain the hacking.[7] On January 27, 2012, The President's Challenge sent out emails to its participants saying that the website was functional as of January 24, 2012, and asked participants to reset their user passwords.[8][9]

Notable members[edit]

Awards[edit]

The Council publishes guidelines for awards that are given out. They are the Presidential Physical Fitness Award, the National Physical Fitness Award, and the Participant Physical Fitness Award. However, it has been announced that the Physical Fitness Test on which these awards are based will no longer be available after the 2012–2013 school year.[15] Additionally, there is the Active Lifestyle Award for staying active[16] and the Presidential Champions Award for raising one's amount of activity.[17] The Champions awards program will end on 30 June, 2018.[18]

Standardized tests[edit]

The award was given to students who achieved the top fifteenth percentile cumulative scores across these events and were based on age/gender and were taken by all participants. Pull ups/flexed-arm hang was based on gender and was the only event where one was done by boys and the other by girls:[19]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Journal of Health and Physical Education. 1944 p. 500, Archived at Google Books.
  2. ^ Executive Order – President's Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition, White House press release, June 23, 2010.
  3. ^ "Michelle Obama jumps rope, emphasizes nutrition", USA Today, June 24, 2010.
  4. ^ "First Lady Launches President’s Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition" Archived 2010-06-26 at the Wayback Machine., White House press release, June 23, 2010.
  5. ^ Tau, Bryon (January 19, 2012). "Let's Move-affiliated website hacked". Politico. Politico.com. Retrieved January 19, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Site Maintenance". The President's Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition. Archived from the original on January 13, 2012. Retrieved January 19, 2012. 
  7. ^ "We apologize for the site maintenance. We will be back up soon". The President's Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition. Archived from the original on January 13, 2012. Retrieved January 20, 2012. 
  8. ^ Important Security Information[dead link]
  9. ^ The President's Challenge Facebook page
  10. ^ https://www.hhs.gov/fitness/about-pcfsn/our-history/index.html
  11. ^ https://www.hhs.gov/fitness/about-pcfsn/our-history/index.html
  12. ^ https://www.hhs.gov/fitness/about-pcfsn/our-history/index.html
  13. ^ https://www.hhs.gov/fitness/about-pcfsn/our-history/index.html
  14. ^ https://www.hhs.gov/fitness/about-pcfsn/our-history/index.html
  15. ^ Physical Fitness Awards
  16. ^ Active Lifestyle Award Archived 2013-04-23 at the Wayback Machine.
  17. ^ Presidential Champions Aware Archived 2013-04-23 at the Wayback Machine.
  18. ^ SuperTracker will be discontinued on June 30, 2018.
  19. ^ https://www.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/fitness/pdfs/50-year-anniversary-booklet.pdf

External links[edit]