Preston upon the Weald Moors

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Preston upon the Weald Moors
Preston upon the Weald Moors - geograph.org.uk - 416994.jpg
Preston upon the Weald Moors
Preston upon the Weald Moors is located in Shropshire
Preston upon the Weald Moors
Preston upon the Weald Moors
Preston upon the Weald Moors shown within Shropshire
Population224 (2011)
OS grid referenceSJ681151
Civil parish
  • Preston upon the Weald Moors
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townTELFORD
Postcode districtTF6
Dialling code01952
PoliceWest Mercia
FireShropshire
AmbulanceWest Midlands
EU ParliamentWest Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Shropshire
52°43′59″N 2°28′16″W / 52.733°N 2.471°W / 52.733; -2.471Coordinates: 52°43′59″N 2°28′16″W / 52.733°N 2.471°W / 52.733; -2.471

Preston upon the Weald Moors is a small village on the northern edge of the town of Telford, part of the borough of Telford and Wrekin in Shropshire. According to the 2001 census the village had a population of 205 although this is likely to have risen due to various building conversions over the proceeding ten years. The population was measured at 224 in the 2011 census.[1] It is one of a number of villages that exist on the Weald Moors of Shropshire.

The name Preston upon the Weald Moors (24 letters) is said to be the longest name of any village in England and is thought to have derived from the words priest and tun (meaning, enclosure, farmstead or homestead) indicating that the village may well have ecclesiastical origins.

Notable buildings[edit]

Preston Hospital[edit]

Locally known as Preston Trust homes, Preston Hospital is one of twelve Grade I listed buildings in Telford. The former Alms house was converted into upmarket apartments and houses around 2005. It was founded in 1716 by the will of Lady Catherine Herbert the daughter of the 1st Earl of Bradford. It was left as a bequest to build an Almshouse in Shropshire for 12 women and 12 girls as thanksgiving for her rescue when lost in the Alps.

St. Lawrence Church[edit]

St. Lawrence Church

The main body of the current church of St. Lawrence in Preston was built to replace the former church between 1739 and 1742 with the keystone above the main doorway dated 1739. The chancel and vestry were added in 1853.

St Lawrence C of E Primary School[edit]

St Lawrence C of E Primary School was opened in 1898. It was built on land donated by the trustees of Preston Hospital to replace an earlier school. It currently has three classes with a total of 83 pupils an improvement on the mid 1980s when the school was threatened with closure with only 29 pupils.

Canal[edit]

The Newport Branch of the Birmingham and Liverpool Junction Canal ran along the North of the village. It was in use until the 1940s when it was partially filled in. The traditional humpback canal bridge remained in place on the road north out of the village until the mid 1980s when it experiments were conducted in to the strength of these bridge. The bridge survived all tests but was demolished anyway in case unseen structural damage had occurred. All that remains is the canal turning bowl which can still be seen in the north east of the village. More substantial remains can be found at Wappenshall Junction a small hamlet approximately a mile to the west.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Civil Parish population 2011". Retrieved 29 November 2015.
  • G.C.Baugh; C.R. Elrington (Editors) "A History of the County of Shropshire: Volume 11: Telford" 1985
  • G C Baugh, C R Elrington (Editors), A P Baggs, D C Cox, Jessie McFall, P A Stamper, A J L Winchester (1985). "Preston upon the Weald Moors: Church". A History of the County of Shropshire: Volume 11: Telford. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 14 May 2011.
  • G C Baugh, C R Elrington (Editors), A P Baggs, D C Cox, Jessie McFall, P A Stamper, A J L Winchester (1985). "Preston upon the Weald Moors: Education". A History of the County of Shropshire: Volume 11: Telford. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 14 May 2011.

External links[edit]