Priestley Medal

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Priestley Medal
PriestleyMedal.jpg
Priestley Medal obverse
Awarded for Distinguished service in the field of chemistry
Date 1923 (1923)
Presented by American Chemical Society (ACS)

The Priestley Medal is the highest honor conferred by the American Chemical Society (ACS) and is awarded for distinguished service in the field of chemistry.[1][2][3] Established in 1922, the award is named after Joseph Priestley, the discoverer of oxygen who immigrated to the United States of America in 1794. The ACS formed in 1876, spearheaded by a group of chemists who had met two years previously in Priestley's home.[4]

The Priestley Medal is commonly awarded to scientists who are advanced in their fields, as it is intended to commemorate lifetime achievement.[4] When the ACS started presenting the Priestley Medal in 1923, they intended to award it every three years. This continued until 1944, when it became an annual award.[4]

Recipients[edit]

Priestley Medal reverse (awarded to Linus Pauling in 1984)

[5]

1920s
1930s
1940s
1950s
1960s
1970s
1980s
1990s
2000s
2010s

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Priestley Medal". Funding & Awards. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2013-06-10. 
  2. ^ Schofield, Robert E. (2004). The Enlightened Joseph Priestley: A Study of His Life and Work from 1773 to 1804. Pennsylvania State University Press. p. 372. ISBN 0-271-02459-3. 
  3. ^ Bowden, Mary Ellen; Rosner, Lisa (2005). Joseph Priestley, Radical Thinker. Chemical Heritage Foundation. p. 16. ISBN 0-941901-38-6. 
  4. ^ a b c Raber, Linda R. (2008-04-07). "85th Anniversary of the Priestley Medal". Chemical & Engineering News. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2013-06-10. 
  5. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: ACS News - The Priestley Medalists, 1923-2008". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  6. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1923: Ira Remsen (1846-1927)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  7. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1929: Francis P. Garvan (1875-1937)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  8. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1935: William Albert Noyes (1857-1941) and 1954: W. Albert Noyes Jr. (1898-1980)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  9. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1941: Thomas Midgley Jr. (1889-1944)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  10. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1944: James Bryant Conant (1893-1978)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  11. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1945: Ian Morris Heilbron (1886-1959)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  12. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1946: Roger Adams (1889-1971)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  13. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1947: Warren K. Lewis (1882-1975)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  14. ^ "The Cover . . .". Chemical & Engineering News 27 (40): 2840. 1949. doi:10.1021/cen-v027n040.p2840. ISSN 0009-2347. 
  15. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1951: Evan J. Crane (1889-1966)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  16. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1953: Sir Robert Robinson (1886-1975)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  17. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1962: Joel H. Hildebrand (1881-1983)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  18. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1963: Peter J. W. Debye (1884-1966)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  19. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1969: Kenneth S. Pitzer (1914-1997)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  20. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1970: Max Tishler (1906-1989)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  21. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1972: George B. Kistiakowsky (1900-1982)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  22. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1973: Harold C. Urey (1893-1981)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  23. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1978: Melvin Calvin (1911-1997)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  24. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1979: Glenn T. Seaborg (1912-1999)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  25. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1984: Linus C. Pauling (1901-1994)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  26. ^ "ACS 1988 National Award Winners". Chemical & Engineering News 65 (35): 48. 1987. doi:10.1021/cen-v065n035.p048. ISSN 0009-2347. 
  27. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: The Priestly Medal - 1989: George C. Pimentel (1922-1989)". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  28. ^ "ACS 1990 National Award Winners". Chemical & Engineering News 67 (37): 32. 1989. doi:10.1021/cen-v067n037.p032. ISSN 0009-2347. 
  29. ^ Baum, Ruby M. (1990). "Caltech's Harry B. Gray Wins ACS's Highest Award in Chemistry". Chemical & Engineering News 68 (23): 25–27. doi:10.1021/cen-v068n023.p025. ISSN 0009-2347. 
  30. ^ Baum, Rudy M. (1991). "PRIESTLEY MEDAL". Chemical & Engineering News 69 (22): 28–31. doi:10.1021/cen-v069n022.p028. ISSN 0009-2347. 
  31. ^ Dagani, Ron (1992). "University of Utah's Robert W. Parry Wins 1993 Priestley Medal". Chemical & Engineering News 70 (21): 21–22. doi:10.1021/cen-v070n021.p021. ISSN 0009-2347. 
  32. ^ "Basic Research: A Perspective". Chemical & Engineering News 72 (11): 27–31. 1994. doi:10.1021/cen-v072n011.p027. ISSN 0009-2347. 
  33. ^ Dagani, Ron (1994). "Texas A&M's Derek H. R. Barton Wins 1995 Priestley Medal". Chemical & Engineering News 72 (21): 39. doi:10.1021/cen-v072n021.p039. ISSN 0009-2347. 
  34. ^ Baum, Rudy M. (1995). "PRIESTLEY MEDAL". Chemical & Engineering News 73 (20): 37–39. doi:10.1021/cen-v073n020.p037. ISSN 0009-2347. 
  35. ^ Long, Janice R. (1996). "Mary Lowe Good To Receive 1997 Priestley Medal". Chemical & Engineering News 74 (20): 36. doi:10.1021/cen-v074n020.p036. ISSN 0009-2347. 
  36. ^ Dagani, Ron; Rawls, Rebecca (1997). "COTTON TO RECEIVE PRIESTLEY MEDAL". Chemical & Engineering News 75 (16): 9. doi:10.1021/cen-v075n016.p009. ISSN 0009-2347. 
  37. ^ "PRIESTLEY MEDAL PROFILE". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  38. ^ "PRIESTLEY MEDAL PROFILE: SMALL-TOWN IOWA GIRL MAKES GOOD". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  39. ^ "C&EN: COVER STORY - PRIESTLY MEDALIST - A CHEMIST FROM COELLO". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  40. ^ "C&EN: NEWS OF THE WEEK: PRIESTLEY MEDAL GOES TO BARD". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  41. ^ "C&EN: PRIESTLEY MEDALIST - A POLYMER MAN'S HERCULEAN EFFORT". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  42. ^ A. MAUREEN ROUHI, C&EN WASHINGTON. "ABOVE AND BEYOND ORGANIC SYNTHESIS". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  43. ^ "C&EN: LATEST NEWS - OLAH WINS 2005 PRIESTLEY MEDAL". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  44. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  45. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: Cover Story - Always On The Move". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  46. ^ Chemical & Engineering News. "Chemical & Engineering News: Cover Story - Surface Science's Sage". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  47. ^ Rudy Baum,. "The 2009 Priestley Medal". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  48. ^ Celia Henry Arnaud. "Bubbling With Enthusiasm". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  49. ^ Jacoby, Mitch; Reisch, Marc (2010). "ZEWAIL WINS 2011 PRIESTLEY MEDAL". Chemical & Engineering News 88 (25): 5. doi:10.1021/cen-v088n025.p005. ISSN 0009-2347. 
  50. ^ Melanie L Miller - Chemical engineering (21 June 2011). "Robert Langer wins top chemistry award". MIT News. Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  51. ^ Elizabeth K. Wilson. "Peter J. Stang Named Priestley Medalist". Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  52. ^ Halford, Bethany (2013-06-10). "Stephen Lippard Named Priestley Medalist". Chemical & Engineering News. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2013-06-10. 
  53. ^ Wilson, Elizabeth K. (2014-06-10). "Jacqueline Barton Named Priestley Medalist". Chemical & Engineering News. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2013-06-12. 
  54. ^ "GT | Georgia Institute of Technology - News Center - Mostafa El-Sayed Wins 2016 Priestley Medal". www.news.gatech.edu. Retrieved 2015-08-19. 
  55. ^ Wilson, Elizabeth K. (2016-06-20). "Tobin Marks Wins Priestley Medal". Chemical & Engineering News. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2016-06-20. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Charles L. Parsons (1932). "Priestley memorial and medal". Journal of Chemical Education 9 (4): 643–346. doi:10.1021/ed009p643. 

External links[edit]