Primatomorpha

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Primatomorpha
Temporal range: PaleoceneHolocene, 65–0 Ma
Olive baboon1.jpg
Olive baboon, Papio anubis
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Grandorder: Euarchonta
Mirorder: Primatomorpha
Orders

The Primatomorpha are a mirorder of mammals containing two orders: the Dermoptera or colugos and the Primates (Plesiadapiformes, Tarsiiformes, Simiiformes).

The term "Primatomorpha" first appeared in the general scientific literature in 1991 (K.C. Beard) and 1992 (Kalandadze, Rautian). Major DNA sequence analyses of predominantly nuclear sequences (Murphy et al., 2001) support the Euarchonta hypothesis, while a major study investigating mitochondrial sequences supports a different tree topology (Arnason et al., 2002). A study investigating retrotransposon presence/absence data has claimed strong support for Euarchonta (Kriegs et al., 2007). Some interpretations of the molecular data link Primates and Dermoptera in a clade (mirorder) known as Primatomorpha, which is the sister of Scandentia. Primates probably split from the Dermoptera sister group 79.6 million years ago during the Cretaceous.

Other interpretations link the Dermoptera and Scandentia together in a group called Sundatheria as the sister group of the primates.[1][2] Recent studies place Scandentia as sister of the Glires, invalidating Euarchonta.[3][4]


Euarchontoglires 


 Scandentia


 Glires 

 Rodentia



 Lagomorpha




Primatomorpha

 Dermoptera


 Primates 
 Strepsirrhini 

lemuroids



lorisoids



 Haplorrhini 

 Tarsiiformes


Simiiformes

platyrrhini



catarrhini








References[edit]

  1. ^ O'Leary, Maureen A.; Bloch, Jonathan I.; Flynn, John J.; Gaudin, Timothy J.; Giallombardo, Andres; Giannini, Norberto P.; Goldberg, Suzann L.; Kraatz, Brian P.; Luo, Zhe-Xi; Meng, Jin; Novacek, Michael J.; Perini, Fernando A.; Randall, Zachary S.; Rougier, Guillermo; Sargis, Eric J.; Silcox, Mary T.; Simmons, Nancy b.; Spaulding, Micelle; Velazco, Paul M.; Weksler, Marcelo; Wible, John r.; Cirranello, Andrea L. (8 February 2013). "The Placental Mammal Ancestor and the Post–K-Pg Radiation of Placentals". Science. 339 (6120): 662–667. Bibcode:2013Sci...339..662O. doi:10.1126/science.1229237. PMID 23393258. Retrieved 9 February 2013. 
  2. ^ Wilford, John Noble (7 February 2013). "Rat-Size Ancestor Said to Link Man and Beast". New York Times. Retrieved 9 February 2013. 
  3. ^ Meredith, Robert W.; Janečka, Jan E.; Gatesy, John; Ryder, Oliver A.; Fisher, Colleen A.; Teeling, Emma C.; Goodbla, Alisha; Eizirik, Eduardo; Simão, Taiz L. L. (2011-10-28). "Impacts of the Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution and KPg Extinction on Mammal Diversification". Science. 334 (6055): 521–524. doi:10.1126/science.1211028. ISSN 0036-8075. PMID 21940861. 
  4. ^ Zhou, Xuming; Sun, Fengming; Xu, Shixia; Yang, Guang; Li, Ming (2015-03-01). "The position of tree shrews in the mammalian tree: Comparing multi-gene analyses with phylogenomic results leaves monophyly of Euarchonta doubtful". Integrative Zoology. 10 (2): 186–198. doi:10.1111/1749-4877.12116. ISSN 1749-4877. 
  • Beard, K.C. (1991). "Vertical postures and climbing in the morphotype of Primatomorpha: Implications for locomotor evolution in primate history". Origine(s) de la Bipedie chez les Hominides. Cahiers de Paleoanthropologie. Paris: Editions du CNRS. pp. 79–87. OCLC 636661230. 
  • Janecka JE, Miller W, Pringle TH, et al. (November 2007). "Molecular and genomic data identify the closest living relative of primates". Science. 318 (5851): 792–4. Bibcode:2007Sci...318..792J. doi:10.1126/science.1147555. PMID 17975064. 
  • Goodman, M., Czelusniak, J., Page, S., Meireles, C.M. (2001). "Where DNA Sequences Place Homo sapiens in a Phylogenetic Classification of Primates". In Tobias, P.V., Raath, M.A.Moggi-Cecchi, J., Doyle, G.A. Humanity from African naissance to coming millennia : colloquia in human biology and paleoanthropology. Firenze: Firenze University Press. ISBN 88-8453-003-2. 

External links[edit]