Prince albums discography

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Prince albums discography
Prince at Coachella.jpg
Studio albums 39
Live albums 3
Compilation albums 6
Video albums 17
EPs 13
Remix albums 1

Prince's albums discography consists of thirty-nine studio albums, five soundtrack albums, four live albums, five compilation albums, seventeen video albums, and twelve extended plays.

Prince's music career began when he signed a record deal with Warner Bros. Records in 1977 at 18 years of age. In 1978, he released his debut album, For You. He followed the release with Prince (1979), Dirty Mind (1980), and Controversy (1981), three albums that were certified platinum and shifted from For You's disco/soul route and instead blended New Wave, rock, pop, R&B, and funk, building up his success.

His 1982 album 1999, credited for being an enormous influence on the next few decades of dance, electro, house, and techno music,[1] sold over six million copies worldwide and became the fifth best-selling album of 1983.

The next album, Purple Rain, the first of three credited to Prince and The Revolution, was the 1984 soundtrack to his film-debut of the same name. In a runaway phenomenon of success, it sold over 22 million copies around the world and at one point, Prince had the number-one song, album, and film in the United States, a feat matching The Beatles' 1964 achievement with 'A Hard Day's Night'. Soon tiring of the project's enormous success and consequent over-exposure, he and the band recorded throughout touring and planned a change of image and musical direction by means of a quick follow-up. 1985's Around the World in a Dayreleased within a year of its predecessor and days after the lucrative Purple Rain tour was curtailed, had no lead single or advance promotion. It inaugurated his own Paisley Park record label, and eschewing Purple Rain 's rock and metal elements, headed off into psychedelic influences and instrumentation.

Prince and The Revolution continued multi-platinum success with the soundtrack to his second movie Under the Cherry Moon, 1986's Parade, in bore further expansion of musical palette, in ongoing collaboration with band members Wendy Melvoin, Lisa Coleman and composer Clare Fischer. The film and album brought into play Broadway orchestration and French-influenced chanson arrangements but, like its predecessors, it also included tracks written, performed and produced entirely solo by Prince.

Following disputes about musical direction and a new style of presentation with an expanded 'soul-revue' flavor, Prince disbanded The Revolution at the end of the tour.

He resumed a solo career with 1987's Sign o' the Times, an experimental double album, which topped several critic end-of-year polls and was Grammy nominated for Album of the Year. The album's projected tour would largely be cancelled as Prince concentrated on developing the acclaimed concert film of the same name, filming in Europe and at his new Paisley Park facility in Chanhassen.

An untitled follow-up (eventually known as The Black Album), promotional copies of which were distributed before it was cancelled, became the most bootlegged album in the history of the music business to date. After a period in which he'd seemed more accessible and grounded, it also restored earlier enigma.

1988'sLovesexy (his first UK number-one record) built further on his mystique while recycling one of the Black Album tracks. During its subsequent tour, under some financial pressure, he would suddenly became involved with production for a highly anticipated forthcoming Warner Brothers film production directed by Tim Burton, writing and producing songs for its soundtrack. His Batman album, inspired by the movie, ended his decade by selling 11 million copies worldwide as one of two soundtracks to Batman, the biggest-grossing movie in cinema history to that date.

Prince entered the 1990s with the soundtrack to his third movie, Graffiti Bridge. Its moderate success was dwarfed by his 1991 album Diamonds and Pearls which, mixing elements of new jack swing, R&B, jazz-soul, and hip-hop and introducing his new band The New Power Generation, spawned several huge hit singles. In its wake, Prince signed what was touted as the biggest deal in music history, worth a reported $100m. However, after his 1992 follow-up, the Love Symbol Album, only scraped the five million copies he needed to advantage himself under the deal, he began to become dissatisfied with his record company, fearing they hadn't adequately promoted it, perhaps to disadvantage his side of the deal. Warner countered with requests for him to slow down on delivery of new projects and extend their term of promotion, a request denied by Prince. It was the beginning of a dispute which mushroomed rapidly.

By 1993, Prince had changed his name to an unpronouncable symbol in order to escape the terms of his contract as the Warner-owned product, 'Prince'. He began demanding faster release by Warner of more projects than they were prepared to promote. In a growing effort to eject himself from his contract, his demands increased further to include ownership of his master recordings and he notoriously began to refer to himself as a 'Slave' to the company, wearing this word on his face in public and in negotiation with the label with resultant public embarrassment for both Warner's public image and his own. He also began to pursue erratic and unconventional promotional methods for his projects, whether under aliases or as part of projects by his band, now being planned under the auspices of a new label, NPG Records which Prince increasingly operated as if an independent venture using Warner as distributor.

In return for co-operating with Warner's The Hits/The B-Sides compilation albums, Prince, under his new name, was granted the opportunity to trial-release independently of Warner on his NPG imprint using an external distributor and label. The one-off experiment, his single The Most Beautiful Girl in the World should have demonstrated that he needed the klout of Warners for continued success but the single instead became an international smash, his first UK number one single, and wrangles between the parties continued with Warners gradually coming round to the idea of ending their arrangement.

To this end, Warner released several 'Prince' albums in quick succession, including Come and the first official release of his erotically charged funk 'bootleg' The Black Album in 1994. The rock-influenced The Gold Experience had been planned by Prince for release under his new name in competition with Warner's 'Prince' products but it was delayed by the lebel until 1995, losing the momentum of its hit single. By 1996, his sales were at a fraction of what they had been prior to the dispute and the final new album he delivered to the label, 1996's Chaos and Disorder, saw his lowest chart performances since 1980.

Prince then began an independent career, licensing to record companies on limited deals or self-distributing via a succession of online operations. The first project, Emancipation was a 3-LP set licensed to EMI later in 1996. He continued with a bootleg-style collection of outtakes,Crystal Ball sold initially via his website in 1998. Now taking 100% of retail minus costs, Prince found even reduced sales to be much more profitable than at his commercial peak with Purple Rain under his prior percentage deal with Warner. As news of his achievement began to circulate in the changing music industry, Prince's reputation and influence began to recover as his prior struggles were vindicated. His innovation was later rewarded when he received a Webby award, the first recognition of his stance against major record companies as prescient of changes to come later in the industry as a whole and of his own online retailing as visionary and pioneering.

In the meantime, Prince was not advantaged by being ahead of the times. The poppy Rave Un2 the Joy Fantastic in 1999, under a one-off deal with Arista Records, failed to deliver anticipated return to former mainstream, chart success. In 2001, while Warner released another successful compilation The Very Best of Prince he, now using his birthname again, put out the critically successful jazz-influenced album The Rainbow Children but struggled to achieve more than cursory media attention and saw poor sales. A solo piano album One Night Alone, sold again via his online operation, gave its name under slight variation to his first live set, the box-set One Nite Alone...Live, which saw the big hits of his past redeveloped in the jazz mode of The Rainbow Children alongside many of its tracks in live form.

Adapting to low-sales profitability and developing his hardcore fanbase, now in close contact with his online business Prince, during the early part of the new century, was releasing much more low-key albums via his websites developing a prescient subscription-model for user music purchases. He was also optimising and downsizing his touring setup and taking much closer involvement with its administration and management which involved minimal contractual involvements and more spontaneous campaigning on promotion and live appearances. A major mainstream 'comeback' soon followed with 2004's Musicology tour, whose album garnered five Grammy nominations and, availing of a loophole (closed behind him), in chart regulations, embedded album sales within ticket sales for the tour which were among the strongest of that year. The result that the album peaked within the Billboard Top 3.

These cutting-edge promotional tactics were extremely effective in restoring Prince rapidly to the commercial high ground, and 3121 (2006), became his first album to debut in the Billboard 200 at Number One. The follow-up, Planet Earth (2007), licensed to record companies for the world was suddenly given away free as a cover-mount on a British newspaper, a very profitable exercise for Prince, particularly as in addition to providing an income from the paper equivalent to high sales, it also served to launch and promote a record-breaking single-venue booking in London, his 21 Nights residency at the Millennium Dome. Its follow-on live album Indigo Nights (2008), a collection of aftershow performances at the venue, was marketed within an expensive coffee-table book.

The 3-disc 2009 set Lotusflow3r / MPLSound sold very well via the Target retailer in the US again seeing the inside of the top three in the Billboard 200. A further British newspaper cover-mount deal distributed20Ten in 2010 although the exercise had reduced impact on the second outing and critical reception was poor. It was with the solo album Art Official Ageand his new band 3rdeyegirl's debut Plectrumelectrum in 2014, that Prince finally returned to critical favour and headlines following the dynamic and spontaneous HitnRun tour which took London's media by storm and gave its name to the band's next album Hit n Run Phase One. First released exclusively on the new Tidal streaming service on September 7, 2015[2][3][4] before being released on CD on September 15, 2015 by NPG Records.[5][5][6] His final album before his death, Hit n Run Phase Two, was released on December 11, 2015 also through Tidal. In the weeks following his death, 20 different Prince albums charted on the Billboard 200 all at the same time, and he became the first and only artist ever to have 5 albums in the Billboard top 10 simultaneously.

Prince has sold over 100 million records worldwide,[7] including 48.9 million certified units in the United States, and over 10 million records in the United Kingdom. Prince has been ranked as the 21st most successful act of all time,[8] the 26th most successful chart artist worldwide,[9] including 27 overall number-one entries,[10] and being the most successful chart act of the 1980s,[11] and tenth most successful chart act of the 1990s.[12]

Albums[edit]

Studio albums[edit]

Year Album Peak chart positions Certifications
(sales thresholds)
US
[13]
AUS
[14]
AUT
[15]
CAN
[16]
GER
[17]
NLD
[18]
NOR
[19]
NZ
[20]
SWE
[21]
SWI
[22]
UK
[23]
1978 For You 138 156
1979 Prince
  • Released: October 19, 1979
  • Label: Warner Bros.
22 92 UK: Silver[24]
US: Platinum[25]
1980 Dirty Mind
  • Released: October 8, 1980
  • Label: Warner Bros.
45 79 61 US: Gold[25]
1981 Controversy
  • Released: October 14, 1981
  • Label: Warner Bros.
21 55 50 UK: Gold[24]
US: Platinum[25]
1982 1999
  • Released: October 27, 1982
  • Label: Warner Bros.
7 35 23
[26]
45 6 51 28 CAN: Platinum[27]
UK: Platinum[24]
US: 4× Platinum[25]
1984 Purple Rain [A]
  • Released: June 25, 1984
  • Label: Warner Bros.
1 1 8 1
[28]
5 1 4 2 3 7 4 CAN: 6× Platinum[27]
UK: 2× Platinum[24]
US: 13x Platinum [25]
1985 Around the World in a Day [A]
  • Released: April 22, 1985
  • Label: Paisley Park, Warner Bros.
1 12 7 16
[29]
10 1 10 16 1 8 5 UK: Gold[24]
US: 2× Platinum[25]
1986 Parade [A]
  • Released: March 31, 1986
  • Label: Paisley Park, Warner Bros.
3 8 7 11
[30]
6 1 10 7 5 2 4 UK: Platinum[24]
US: Platinum[25]
1987 Sign o' the Times
  • Released: March 30, 1987
  • Label: Paisley Park, Warner Bros.
6 20 2 27
[31]
11 2 3 6 6 1 4 CAN: 4× Platinum[27]
UK: Platinum[24]
US: Platinum[25]
1988 Lovesexy
  • Released: May 10, 1988
  • Label: Paisley Park, Warner Bros.
11 8 3 7
[32]
4 1 2 1 1 1 1 UK: Platinum[24]
US: Gold[25]
1989 Batman
  • Released: June 20, 1989
  • Label: Warner Bros.
1 4 3 1 3 1 2 4 2 1 1 CAN: 3× Platinum[27]
UK: Platinum[24]
US: 2× Platinum[25]
1990 Graffiti Bridge
  • Released: August 20, 1990
  • Label: Paisley Park, Warner Bros.
6 10 8 22
[33]
4 4 2 3 7 2 1 CAN: Gold[27]
UK: Gold[24]
US: Gold[25]
1991 Diamonds and Pearls [B]
  • Released: October 1, 1991
  • Label: Paisley Park, Warner Bros.
3 1 4 8
[34]
8 6 5 5 8 3 2 CAN: 2× Platinum[27]
UK: 3× Platinum[24]
US: 2× Platinum[25]
1992 Love Symbol Album [35] [B]
  • Released: October 13, 1992
  • Label: Paisley Park, Warner Bros.
5 1 1 16
[36]
5 6 10 4 10 4 1 UK: Platinum[24]
US: Platinum[25]
1994 Come
  • Released: August 16, 1994
  • Label: Warner Bros.
15 2 4 34
[37]
9 4 7 16 7 4 1 UK: Gold[24]
US: Gold[25]
The Black Album
  • Released: November 22, 1994
  • Label: Warner Bros.
47 15 7 48
[38]
51 35 8 36
1995 The Gold Experience
  • Released: September 26, 1995
  • Label: NPG, Warner Bros.
6 13 28 35
[39]
24 3 12 11 7 4 UK: Gold[24]
US: Gold[25]
1996 Chaos and Disorder
  • Released: July 9, 1996
  • Label: Warner Bros.
26 54 17 43
[40]
42 8 15 32 21 14
Emancipation
  • Released: November 19, 1996
  • Label: NPG, EMI
11 8 13 24
[41]
21 13 27 22 22 1 18 CAN: Platinum[27]
US: 2× Platinum[25]
1998 Crystal Ball / The Truth
  • Released: January 29, 1998
  • Label: NPG
62 91
1999 The Vault: Old Friends 4 Sale
  • Released: August 24, 1999
  • Label: Warner Bros.
85 40 44 15 21 47
Rave Un2 the Joy Fantastic
  • Released: November 9, 1999
  • Label: NPG, Arista
18 82 44 5
[42]
53 17 37 49 19 145 US: Gold[25]
2001 The Rainbow Children
  • Released: November 20, 2001
  • Label: NPG, Redline Entertainment
109 74
2002 One Nite Alone...
  • Released: May 14, 2002
  • Label: NPG
2003 Xpectation
  • Released: January 1, 2003
  • Label: NPG
N.E.W.S
  • Released: July 29, 2003
  • Label: NPG, MP Media
93 83
2004 Musicology
  • Released: March 29, 2004
  • Label: NPG, Columbia
3 19 4 11 4 3 2 25 6 2 3 CAN: Gold[27]
UK: Gold[24]
US: 2× Platinum[25]
The Chocolate Invasion
  • Released: March 29, 2004
  • Label: NPG
The Slaughterhouse
  • Released: March 29, 2004
  • Label: NPG
2006 3121
  • Released: March 21, 2006
  • Label: NPG, Universal
1 18 15 9 4 3 5 18 1 9 UK: Silver[24]
US: Gold[25]
2007 Planet Earth
  • Released: July 24, 2007
  • Label: NPG, Columbia
3 38 11 17 7 3 9 35 1
2009 Lotusflow3r / MPLSound (released as a 3-CD set together with Elixer by Bria Valente)
  • Released: March 29, 2009
  • Label: NPG
2 23
2010 20Ten
  • Released: July 10, 2010
  • Label: NPG
2014 Plectrumelectrum [C]
  • Released: September 26, 2014
  • Label: NPG, Warner Bros.
8 33 10 31 9 8 31 50 8 11
Art Official Age
  • Released: September 26, 2014
  • Label: NPG, Warner Bros.
5 15 8 21 18 4 2 17 9 4 8
2015 HITnRUN Phase One
  • Released: September 7, 2015
  • Label: NPG
48 25 53 53 11 27 50
HITnRUN Phase Two
  • Released: December 12, 2015
  • Label: NPG
40 117 20 47 21 38 50 9 21
A^ With The Revolution
B^ With The New Power Generation
C^ With 3rdeyegirl

Live albums[edit]

Year Album details Peak chart positions Certifications
(sales thresholds)
US
[13]
AUS
[14]
AUT
[15]
CAN
[16]
GER
[17]
NLD
[18]
NOR
[19]
NZ
[20]
SWE
[21]
SWI
[22]
UK
[23]
2002 One Nite Alone... Live! / One Nite Alone... The Aftershow: It Ain't Over!
  • Released: December 17, 2002
  • Label: NPG, MP Media
2004 C-Note
  • Released: January 3, 2003
  • Label: NPG
2008 Indigo Nights
  • Released: September 30, 2008
  • Label: NPG

Remix albums[edit]

Year Album details Peak chart positions Certifications
US
[13]
AUS
[14]
AUT
[15]
CAN
[16]
GER
[17]
NLD
[18]
NOR
[19]
NZ
[20]
SWE
[21]
SWI
[22]
UK
[23]
2001 Rave In2 the Joy Fantastic
  • Released: April 29, 2001[43]
  • Label: NPG

Compilation albums[edit]

Year Album details Peak chart positions Certifications
US
[13]
AUS
[14]
AUT
[15]
CAN
[16]
GER
[17]
NLD
[18]
NOR
[19]
NZ
[20]
SWE
[21]
SWI
[22]
UK
[23]
1993 The Hits 1
  • Released: September 14, 1993
  • Label: Warner Bros.
46 19 7 34 20 14 15 12 10 22 5 UK: Platinum[24]
US: Platinum[25]
The Hits 2
  • Released: September 14, 1993
  • Label: Warner Bros.
54 20 9 36 19 15 14 8 6 10 5 UK: Platinum[24]
US: Platinum[25]
The Hits/The B-Sides
  • Released: September 14, 1993
  • Label: Warner Bros.
4 4 67
[44]
58 10 11 1
[45]
19 9 4 NZ: Platinum[46]
UK: Gold[24]
US: Platinum[25]
1996 Girl 6
  • Released: March 19, 1996
  • Label: Warner Bros.
75 83
2001 The Very Best of Prince
  • Released: July 31, 2001
  • Label: Warner Bros.
1 2 5 1 5 3 2 1 4 1 2 CAN: Gold[27]
NZ: Platinum[46]
UK: 2× Platinum[24]
US: Platinum[25]
2006 Ultimate Prince
  • Released: August 22, 2006
  • Label: Warner Bros.
6 6 22 22 19 39 10 3 7 9 3 NZ: Platinum[46]
UK: Platinum[24]
2016 4Ever
  • Released: November 22, 2016
  • Label: Warner Bros./NPG
35 36 64
[47]
40 87 10 21 21

Albums credited to The New Power Generation[edit]

Year Album details Peak chart positions Certifications
(sales thresholds)
US
[13]
AUS
[14]
AUT
[15]
CAN
[16]
GER
[17]
NLD
[18]
NOR
[19]
NZ
[20]
SWE
[21]
SWI
[22]
UK
[23]
1993 Goldnigga
  • Released: August 31, 1993
  • Label: NPG
1995 Exodus
  • Released: March 27, 1995
  • Label: NPG
31 34 11
1998 Newpower Soul
  • Released: June 30, 1998
  • Label: NPG
22 47 24 34 23 40 57 22 38 500,000 worldwide

Albums credited to The NPG Orchestra[edit]

Year Album details Peak chart positions Certifications
(sales thresholds)
US
[13]
AUS
[14]
AUT
[15]
CAN
[16]
GER
[17]
NLD
[18]
NOR
[19]
NZ
[20]
SWE
[21]
SWI
[22]
UK
[23]
1997 Kamasutra (limited edition cassette)
  • Released: February 14, 1997[48]
  • Label: NPG
1998 Crystal Ball / The Truth / Kamasutra
(limited edition includes CD version of Kamasutra)
  • Released: January 29, 1998
  • Label: NPG

Albums credited to Madhouse[edit]

Year Album details Peak chart positions Certifications
(sales thresholds)
US
[13]
AUS
[14]
AUT
[15]
CAN
[16]
GER
[17]
NLD
[18]
NOR
[19]
NZ
[20]
SWE
[21]
SWI
[22]
UK
[23]
1987 8
  • Released: January 21, 1987
  • Label: Paisley Park
107
1987 16
  • Released: November 18, 1987
  • Label: Paisley Park

Internet albums[edit]

In this section albums are listed that only have been made available for download on the internet.

Year Album details Certifications
(sales thresholds)
2000 NPG Music Club Vol. 1–12
  • Released: 2000–2002
  • Label: NPG
2009 Lotusflow3r
(download version including "The Morning After")
  • Released: March 24, 2009
  • Label: NPG

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Leahey, Andrew. "Prince Biography". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2016-05-22. 
  2. ^ "Prince premieres new single "Stare"". Consequence of Sound. Retrieved 1 August 2015. 
  3. ^ "Prince to Release New Record, 'The Hit & Run Album'". Spin. Retrieved 1 August 2015. 
  4. ^ "Prince Announces The Hit & Run Album". Pitchfork. Retrieved 1 August 2015. 
  5. ^ a b "Hit n'Run: Prince: Amazon.fr: Musique". Amazon.fr. Retrieved 2016-05-22. 
  6. ^ "HITNRUN Phase One". Fnac.com. 29 August 2015. Retrieved 29 August 2015. 
  7. ^ "Ebony". Books.google.be. p. 128. Retrieved 2016-05-22. 
  8. ^ "Who was the world's biggest music act of all time?". Tsort.info. Retrieved 2016-05-22. 
  9. ^ "The greatest number of hits". Tsort.info. Retrieved 2016-05-22. 
  10. ^ "Who had the most number 1s?". Tsort.info. Retrieved 2016-05-22. 
  11. ^ "Who were the most successful artists of each decade?". Tsort.info. Retrieved 2016-05-22. 
  12. ^ "Songs from the 1990s". Tsort.info. Retrieved 2016-05-22. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f g "Chart history - Prince". AllMusic. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f g Peak chart positions for Prince albums in Australia:
    • Top 100 (Kent Music Report) peaks to 19 June 1988: Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992 (illustrated ed.). St Ives, N.S.W.: Australian Chart Book. p. 239. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.  N.B. The Kent Report chart was licensed by ARIA from mid-1983 until June 19, 1988. Lovesexy peaked at number 8 on this chart one week before the ARIA-produced chart (archived on australian-charts.com) commenced.
    • Top 50 (ARIA Chart) peaks from June 26, 1988: "australian-charts.com > Prince in Australian Charts". Hung Medien. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
    • Top 100 (ARIA Chart) peaks from January 1990 to December 2010: Ryan, Gavin (2011). Australia's Music Charts 1988–2010. Mt. Martha, VIC, Australia: Moonlight Publishing. 
  15. ^ a b c d e f g "Prince discography". Austrian charts (in German). Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  16. ^ a b c d e f g "Prince discography". Canadian album charts. Retrieved 2008-11-08. 
  17. ^ a b c d e f g "Prince discography". German charts (in German). Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  18. ^ a b c d e f g "Prince discography". Austrian charts (in German). Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  19. ^ a b c d e f g "Prince discography". Norwegian charts. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  20. ^ a b c d e f g "NZ Albums chart". charts.org.nz. Retrieved 2010-05-08. 
  21. ^ a b c d e f g "Prince discography". Swedish charts. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  22. ^ a b c d e f g "Prince discography". swisscharts.com. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  23. ^ a b c d e f g Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 439. ISBN 1-904994-10-5. 
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u "Certified Awards". British Phonographic Industry. Archived from the original on April 24, 2008. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w RIAA Gold and Platinum Search for albums by Prince. Riaa.com, Retrieved on 2008-12-15.
  26. ^ "1999 - Canadian Album Chart". RPM. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  27. ^ a b c d e f g h i "CRIA Certifications". Canadian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  28. ^ "Purple Rain - Canadian Album Chart". RPM. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  29. ^ "Around the World in a Day - Canadian Album Chart". RPM. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  30. ^ "Parade - Canadian Album Chart". RPM. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  31. ^ "Sign o' the Times - Canadian Album Chart". RPM. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  32. ^ "Lovesexy - Canadian Album Chart". RPM. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  33. ^ "Graffiti Bridge - Canadian Album Chart". RPM. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  34. ^ "Diamonds and Pearls - Canadian Album Chart". RPM. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  35. ^ Due to copyright issues regarding Prince and the copyrighted symbol, Wikipedia can not show the exact name of this album, outside of it being displayed on the cover art. The title provided is widely recognized as an alternate.
  36. ^ "Love Symbol - Canadian Album Chart". RPM. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  37. ^ "Come - Canadian Album Chart". RPM. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  38. ^ "The Black Album - Canadian Album Chart". RPM. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  39. ^ "The Gold Experience - Canadian Album Chart". RPM. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  40. ^ "Chaos and Disorder - Canadian Album Chart". RPM. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  41. ^ "Emancipation - Canadian Album Chart". RPM. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  42. ^ "Rave Un2 the Joy Fantastic - Canadian Album Chart". RPM. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  43. ^ Uptown, 2004, p.263
  44. ^ "The Hits/The B-Sides - Canadian Album Chart". RPM. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  45. ^ http://nztop40.co.nz/chart/albums?chart=4236
  46. ^ a b c "New Zealand album certifications". Recorded Music NZ. Retrieved May 20, 2016. 
  47. ^ http://oe3.orf.at/charts/stories/2602614/
  48. ^ Uptown, 2004, p. 203

Bibliography[edit]

  • Nilsen, Per; Joozt Mattheij (2004). The Vault – The Definitive Guide to the Musical World of Prince. Uptown. ISBN 91-631-5482-X. 

External links[edit]