Princess Marie of Windisch-Graetz

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Princess Marie
Duchess Marie of Mecklenburg
1856 Marie.jpg
Duchess Marie of Mecklenburg, née Princess of Windisch-Graetz
Born 1856
Died 1929 (aged 72–73)
Spouse Duke Paul Frederick of Mecklenburg
Issue Duke Paul Friedrich of Mecklenburg
Duchess Marie Louise of Mecklenburg
Duchess Marie Antoinette of Mecklenburg
Duke Henry Borwin of Mecklenburg
Duke Joseph of Mecklenburg
House House of Windisch-Graetz (by birth)
House of Mecklenburg-Schwerin
(by marriage)
Father Hugo, Prince of Windisch-Grätz
Mother Princess Louise of Mecklenburg-Schwerin
Religion Roman Catholicism

Princess Marie of Windisch-Graetz (1856–1929) was a daughter of Hugo, Prince of Windisch-Grätz, and Princess Louise of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (herself the eldest daughter of Grand Duke Paul Frederick and Princess Alexandrine of Prussia).


In Schwerin on 5 May 1881, Princess Marie married her first cousin, the German-born Duke Paul Frederick of Mecklenburg, second son of Frederick Francis II, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg, and his wife, Princess Augusta Reuss of Köstritz.[1] The couple had three surviving children, all of whom were raised as Roman Catholics, Marie's religion,[2] and lived a quiet life in Venice, where they befriended Cardinal Sarto (later Pope Pius X), who often visited the family and acted as their spiritual advisor.[3]

On 21 April 1884 Duke Paul Frederick deferred his and his sons' rights of succession to Mecklenburg-Schwerin in favour of his younger brothers and their sons, so they would take precedence over him and his.[1][4] In 1887 her husband, raised a Lutheran, converted to Roman Catholicism, the religion of his wife and their common children.[5]

Marie née Windisch-Graetz surveyed several archaeological excavations in Austria and Carniola, including excavations at Hallstatt Archaeological Site in Vače. Some of the artifacts were sold to museums in Harvard, Oxford and Berlin by her daughter Duchess Marie Antoinette of Mecklenburg.[citation needed]

In 1906 after raising the concerns of his nephew Frederick Francis IV, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg, about his expenses Duke Paul Frederick and his wife were ordered to submit expenditures to the comptroller of the royal household.[6]



  1. ^ a b Huberty, Michel; Alain Giraud; F. B. Magdelaine. L'Allemagne Dynastique, Tome VI : Bade-Mecklembourg. pp. 233, 239. ISBN 978-2-901138-06-8. 
  2. ^ "The Spirit of Roman Catholicism". The Toronto World. 27 October 1884. p. 2. 
  3. ^ "The Pope as a Matchmaker". Yukon World. 12 February 1905. p. 4. 
  4. ^ "News by the Mail". Bruce Herald. 3 June 1884. p. 3. 
  5. ^ "Catholic News". New Zealand Tablet. 26 August 1887. p. 31. 
  6. ^ "European Intelligence in News and Comment". New York Times. 8 April 1906. p. SM7. 


  • Viola Maier: Die Herzogin Marie von Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1856–1929). In: Julia K. Koch, Eva-Maria Mertens (eds.): Eine Dame zwischen 500 Herren. Johanna Mestorf, Werk und Wirkung (= Frauen, Forschung, Archäologie. Bd. 4). Waxmann, Münster etc., 2002, ISBN 3-8309-1066-5, pp. 257–265.
  • Andrea Rottloff: Archäologen (= Die Berühmten). Philipp von Zabern, Mainz 2009, ISBN 978-3-8053-4063-2 pp. 87–89.
  • Grewolls, Grete (2011). Wer war wer in Mecklenburg und Vorpommern. Das Personenlexikon (in German). Rostock: Hinstorff Verlag. p. 6319. ISBN 978-3-356-01301-6.