Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center

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Princeton Medical Center
Penn Medicine (Princeton Health)
Princeton Medical Center logo.svg
Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center.jpg
A panorama of the Atkinson Pavilion of the Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center in Plainsboro, New Jersey.
Geography
Location1 Plainsboro Road
Plainsboro, NJ 08536, United States
Coordinates40°20′21″N 74°37′25″W / 40.339111°N 74.623722°W / 40.339111; -74.623722Coordinates: 40°20′21″N 74°37′25″W / 40.339111°N 74.623722°W / 40.339111; -74.623722
Organization
FundingNon-profit hospital
Affiliated universityRobert Wood Johnson Medical School
Services
Emergency departmentYes
Beds355
HelipadFAA LID: 45NJ
History
Former name(s)University Medical Center of Princeton
Links
Websiteprincetonhcs.org/our-locations/pmc

Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center (PMC), formerly known as the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro, is a 355-bed[1] non-profit, tertiary, and academic medical center located in Plainsboro Township, New Jersey, servicing the western New Jersey area and the Central Jersey area. Princeton Medical Center is one of the region's only university-level academic medical centers. The hospital is owned by the Penn Medicine Health System and the only hospital of such in New Jersey. PMC is a major university hospital of the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School of Rutgers University[2] and has a helipad to handle transport critical patients from and to other hospitals via PennStar.[3]

About[edit]

The hospital was previously located in Princeton on Witherspoon Street, until May 22, 2012, when the new location opened off of U.S.1.[4] The new hospital was designed by a joint venture between HOK and RMJM Hiller.[5][6]

The hospital was a member of the Princeton HealthCare System, which was formally incorporated into the University of Pennsylvania Health System in January 2018.[7][8][9] The addition of the Princeton HealthCare System will make it the sixth hospital in the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which will employ over 3,000 staff and more than 1,000 physicians.[10]

An up close photo of the Atkinson Pavilion of the Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center.

Pediatric care to the hospital is provided by doctors from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia on PMC's inpatient pediatric wards, pediatric emergency department, and pediatric specialty care center.[11]

Adjacent to the medical center is the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Specialty Center that treats infants, children, adolescents, and young adults up to the age of 21.[12]

It has no relationship with the fictional Princeton-Plainsboro Teaching Hospital, which was the setting for the medical drama House M.D. from 2004 to 2012, even though they share a similar location and name.

The hospital is notable for being Albert Einstein's place of death.[13][14]

The hospital implemented strict protocols to limit spread of illness during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, including limiting visitors to patients throughout its facilities.[15][16]

In 2018–19, the hospital ranked as #10 best in New Jersey, and high performing in 1 specialty and 3 procedures.[17]

In 2020–21, U.S. News & World Report ranked the hospital as #9 in New Jersey, #24 in the New York area, and High Performing in the area of Orthopedics.

Affiliations[edit]

In addition to its affiliation with Penn Medicine, the hospital is affiliated with the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School[18] and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.[12]

The CHOP specialty center at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "American Hospital Directory - Princeton Medical Center (310010) - Free Profile". www.ahd.com. Retrieved 2020-04-20.
  2. ^ "Affiliated Hospitals". rwjms.rutgers.edu. Retrieved 2020-04-20.
  3. ^ "AirNav: 45NJ - Princeton Medical Center Heliport". www.airnav.com. Archived from the original on 2020-03-15. Retrieved 2020-04-20.
  4. ^ "New Hospital Project". Archived from the original on February 23, 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ "University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro Replacement Hospital, Plainsboro, NJ". Syska Hennessy Group. Retrieved 2020-10-08.
  6. ^ "Penn Medicine – Princeton Medical Center". HOK. Retrieved 2020-10-08.
  7. ^ "Penn Medicine and Princeton HealthCare System Officially Merge". Philadelphia Magazine. 2018-01-09. Archived from the original on 2018-01-11. Retrieved 2020-01-07.
  8. ^ "Princeton Health Joins Penn Medicine". Penn Medicine Princeton Health. Archived from the original on January 13, 2018. Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  9. ^ Braccia, Zoe (January 10, 2018). "Penn Medicine officially incorporated the Princeton HealthCare System". The Daily Pennsylvanian. Philadelphia, PA. Archived from the original on January 14, 2018. Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  10. ^ "Amid regulatory uncertainty, Penn Medicine acquires Princeton HealthCare". WHYY. Archived from the original on 2018-07-12. Retrieved 2018-07-12.
  11. ^ Philadelphia, The Children's Hospital of (2014-06-01). "CHOP Care at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center". www.chop.edu. Archived from the original on 2020-01-30. Retrieved 2020-01-29.
  12. ^ a b Philadelphia, The Children's Hospital of (2014-06-01). "CHOP Care at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center". www.chop.edu. Retrieved 2020-10-08.
  13. ^ "Albert Einstein". Biography. Archived from the original on 2020-02-23. Retrieved 2020-01-29.
  14. ^ "What Killed Albert Einstein?". Not Even Past. 2016-09-21. Retrieved 2020-10-08.
  15. ^ March 14; 2020. "Penn Medicine Princeton Health COVID-19 Preparations". princetonol.com. Archived from the original on 2020-09-26. Retrieved 2020-04-20.CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  16. ^ Tarrazi, Alexis (2020-03-10). "Coronavirus: Princeton Medical Center Asks Visitors To Stay Home". Princeton, NJ Patch. Retrieved 2020-10-08.
  17. ^ Bellano, Anthony (2018-08-14). "Princeton Medical Center Among Top 10 Hospitals In New Jersey". Princeton, NJ Patch. Retrieved 2020-10-08.
  18. ^ "Affiliated Hospitals". rwjms.rutgers.edu. Archived from the original on 2019-12-10. Retrieved 2020-01-30.

External links[edit]