Printing and writing paper

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Ancient Sanskrit on Hemp based Paper. Hemp Fiber was commonly used in the production of paper from 200 BCE to the Late 1800's.

Printing and writing papers are paper grades used for newspapers, magazines, catalogs, books, commercial printing, business forms, stationeries, copying and digital printing. About 1/3 of the total pulp and paper marked (in 2000) is printing and writing papers.[1] The pulp or fibers used in printing and writing papers are extracted from wood using a chemical or mechanical process.[2]

In the United States printing and writing papers are separated into four main categories:[3]

  1. Uncoated Freesheet Paper
  2. Uncoated Mechanical Paper
  3. Coated Freesheet Paper
  4. Coated Mechanical Paper

Writing paper standards[edit]

Specifications MD/CD Unit Level A Level B Method
Substance gsm 80-120 60-80 TCVN 1270:2000
Durable mN.m²/g TCVN 3229:2000
MD 5.7 4.1
CD
Tearing
strength ≥
m TCVN 1862:2000
MD 3800 3200
CD 2200 1800
Water
absortiveness
Cobb 60
g/m² 23 23 TCVN 6726:2000
Brightness ISO ≥  % 78 70 TCVN 1865:2000
Opacity  % 85 85 TCVN 6728:2000
Roughness
Bendtsen
ml/
minute
280 400 TCVN 3226:2001
Ash content ≥  % 3 3 TCVN 1864:2001
Moisture
content
 % 7±1 7±1 TCVN 1867:2001

Types[edit]

History[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Paulapuro, Hannu (2000). "Chapter 1". Paper and Board grades. Papermaking Science and Technology. 18. Finland: Fapet Oy. pp. 14–51. ISBN 952-5216-18-7. 
  2. ^ "Printing and Writing Paper: What's The Difference". Clash Graphics. Retrieved August 1, 2015. 
  3. ^ "Printing and Writing Paper". American Forest & Paper Association. Retrieved August 1, 2015.