Pritzker family

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The Pritzker family is a Jewish American family engaged in entrepreneurship and philanthropy, and one of the wealthiest families in the United States of America, being near the top of Forbes magazine’s “America’s Richest Families” list since the magazine began listings in 1982.

The family is most famous for owning the Hyatt hotel chain, and the Marmon Group, conglomerate of manufacturing and industrial service companies which has since been sold to Berkshire Hathaway.[1] Other holdings have included the Superior Bank of Chicago, which notably collapsed in 2001, the TransUnion credit bureau and the Royal Caribbean cruise line.

The Pritzker family and its members are of Jewish descent,[2] and is known for its relationship to Chicago.[3]

Family business[edit]

In 1995, Jay Pritzker (cofounder of Hyatt) stepped down and Thomas Pritzker took control of the The Pritzker Organization.[3] When Jay died in 1999, the family decided to split the business into 11 pieces worth $1.4 billion a piece, but had to settle a lawsuit from two family members who received $500 million each.[3]

In 2011, the dissolution had been completed and each of the cousins had gone their separate ways, with some pursuing business and others pursuing philanthropic or artistic ventures.[4]

Genealogy[edit]

Family fortune[edit]

Members of the Pritzker family on the Forbes 400 list of “The 400 Richest Americans 2015”:[8]

Rank Name Net Worth
557 Anthony Pritzker $3.1 billion
512 J.B. Pritzker $3.4 billion
847 John Pritzker $2.2 billion
551 Thomas Pritzker $3.1 billion
737 Penny Pritzker $2.5 billion
847 Daniel Pritzker $2.2 billion
1054 Jennifer N. Pritzker $1.78 billion
737 Jean (Gigi) Pritzker $2.5 billion
381 Karen Pritzker $4.3 billion
1054 Linda Pritzker $1.85 billion
1250 Nicholas J. Pritzker $1.48 billion
Total $29 billion

Legacy[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ BAJAJ, Vikas (December 26, 2007). "Rapidly, Buffett Secures a Deal for $4.5 Billion". The New York Times. The New York Times. Retrieved 29 October 2015. 
  2. ^ "Pritzker family". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 20 September 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c "Inside the Pritzker family feud". tribunedigital-chicagotribune. Retrieved 2016-03-21. 
  4. ^ "Pritzker family agreement to divide wealth comes to a close". tribunedigital-chicagotribune. Retrieved 2016-03-21. 
  5. ^ N. L. Baranova-Shestova ″The Life of Lev Shestov″
  6. ^ Geidner, Chris (August 23, 2013). "Billionaire Backer Of Open Transgender Military Service Comes Out As Transgender". BuzzFeed. Retrieved August 23, 2013. 
  7. ^ http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20130823/BLOGS03/130829911/james-pritzker-opens-new-chapter-in-her-life
  8. ^ "The 400 Richest Americans 2015". Forbes.com. Retrieved 2011-10-23.