Pro-Cathedral of Saint Patrick in Newark

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St. Patrick's Pro-Cathedral
Patrick pro cathedral Newark jeh.jpg
Pro-Cathedral of Saint Patrick in Newark is located in Essex County, New Jersey
Pro-Cathedral of Saint Patrick in Newark
Pro-Cathedral of Saint Patrick in Newark is located in New Jersey
Pro-Cathedral of Saint Patrick in Newark
Pro-Cathedral of Saint Patrick in Newark is located in the US
Pro-Cathedral of Saint Patrick in Newark
Location Washington Street and Central Avenue, Newark, New Jersey
Coordinates 40°44′31″N 74°10′21″W / 40.74194°N 74.17250°W / 40.74194; -74.17250Coordinates: 40°44′31″N 74°10′21″W / 40.74194°N 74.17250°W / 40.74194; -74.17250
Area 0 acres (0 ha)
Built 1846
Architect Moran, Father Patrick; Keely, Patrick C.
Architectural style Gothic Revival, Gothic Revival
NRHP Reference # 72000791[1]
NJRHP # [2]
Added to NRHP November 3, 1972

St. Patrick's Pro-Cathedral is a former (or proto-) cathedral of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States, located in Newark, New Jersey within the Archdiocese of Newark.

Description[edit]

Saint Patrick was built in 1846 and served as the seat of its prelate bishop from 1853 until the completion of the Basilica of the Sacred Heart.[3]

The building itself was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972,[1] and it has undergone extensive rehabilitation over the past fifteen years following years of declining membership. Several traditions remain, connecting the parish to its history as the "Old Cathedral" of Newark, including the 12:15 Ash Wednesday Liturgy with the Archbishop, the 12:15 Sunday Liturgy on Easter in memory of the 1916 Easter Rising in Dublin, the annual Newark Fire Department memorial Mass, and many other archdiocesan and Irish-heritage events. The parish is also the national shrine to Our Lady of El Quinche.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ "New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places - Essex County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection - Historic Preservation Office. April 1, 2010. p. 5. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  3. ^ [1]