Professional writing

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Professional writing is writing for reward or as a profession, or it is any form of written communication produced in a workplace environment or context. Works produced with the professional writing style allow professionals (e.g. employers, lawyers, businesspeople, etc.) to make informed decisions. Professional writing involves the use of precise language to convey information in a way that is easily understood by its intended audience, and it may be directed to inform, persuade, instruct, stimulate debate, or encourage action. For example, in a business office, a memorandum (abbrev. memo) can be used to provide a solution to a problem, make a suggestion, or convey information.

A professional writer may be freelance, meaning he or she works on a self-employed basis, or fully employed in an occupation where a professional writing standard is a prerequisite, such as journalism, marketing, advertising, public relations, the military, or technical writing.[1] While not necessarily the practitioner's primary profession, professional writing skills are essential in many other fields such as law, medicine, business, engineering, and social work.[2]

Overview[edit]

Professional writing is any type of writing that is written with the intention of communicating with others in a professional and courteous manner to facilitate work. Professional writing is either internal or external to a business or organization, which means that the audience of a written work is either an insider or outsider of the professional writer's organization; examples of internal business writing include email messages, memos, and reports while some examples of external business writing are letters and email messages.

Professional writing differs from other types of writing, such as academic and technical writing, because the term defines a general overview of writing that is done for profit in a workplace environment. Professional writing differs from academic writing due to the difference in purpose and readership between the two styles. Academic writing informs the audience through critical approach and directs further thinking by emphasizing clarity and thought while professional writing is applied to a business or setting (a hospital, a company, or a factory) and is meant to facilitate work through communication. The audience of academic writing is also limited in contrast to professional writing; specialized experts in specific fields make of the primary readership of academic writing while the amount and identities of readers of professional writing can be varied. When writing, professional writers must take into consideration the possibility of unexpected tertiary readers who can come across their document.[3]

Professional writing differs from technical writing because of the type of content in technical writing. Technical writing could be identified as a concentration of the broad generalization of professional writing—technical writing is principally directed towards fields of interest. Both are similar in that they take place in professional workplace context and are primarily targeted to allow communication between experts; however, technical writing focuses on technical, specialized topics, such as science, technology, and engineering.

Style[edit]

The audience of professional and business documents plays a significant role in the style of a professional document. Successful professional writers adapt their document to fulfill the needs of their audience. Four factors are taken into consideration when a professional writer creates a professional document:

  1. the audience's pre-existing knowledge of the covered material,
  2. the readers' expectations of style and format based on examples of the same genre,
  3. the readers' level of reading based on the reason for reading the document, and
  4. the relationship between writer and reader.[4]

The audience's pre-existing knowledge remains an important focus for a professional document because it would affect the audience's ability to read the document. For example, a general audience with little knowledge of a document's subject would be unable to read it if it contained specific, technical jargon. A professional writer would then have to minimize the amount technical jargon or define terms for the reader.

Expectations of style and format are influential in the format and development of a professional document. Precedents created by earlier documents of the same genre of a professional writer's work heavily influence how the reader of his or her document will judge the credibility of both the writer and document. Documents belonging to a specific genre are expected to be written in a way that adheres to a format and style that defines that genre. If a professional writer were to produce a document that does not adhere to the precedented style, he or she and the document would lose credibility.

Regarding business and professional writing, the relationship between writer and reader is key. The familiarity between the two influences the language used. For example, an employee might write more informally via email to a coworker of the same hierarchal level than he or she would write via email to his or her employer.

Uses[edit]

Communication[edit]

There is, particularly in business, a need for concise and unambiguous communication with colleagues, suppliers, clients, and the general public. Professional writing forestalls inattentiveness and criticism.[5]

Persuasion[edit]

Persuasive professional writing is connected to the concept of rhetoric, which focuses on informing or persuading and relies upon stimulating the interest of the audience through creating authoritative arguments. A professional writer uses rhetoric and persuasion when creating a document that is intended to suggest a solution to a problem or encourage action. A professional writer uses persuasive language when trying to influence the reader to do something as a result of reading a document. Professional writing Feasibility reports and economic justification reports are examples of documents that have such purposes.

Information[edit]

Clear and concise professional writing is vital in many fields where misunderstanding could have serious consequences, such as in law, engineering, technical manuals, and product labels. Misunderstandings might also occur with international audiences; for this reason, a professional writer would have to take careful consideration of cultural differences. The use of language, style, and even color in a document could have detrimental effects because these elements, along with others, can change meaning when translated. For example, a picture of a woman wearing a swimsuit on the beach in an ad would be met with nonchalance in the United States; however, if the same picture was shown in an area with a prevalent Muslim populace, it would be met with outrage because of the religious beliefs that bar women from showing skin. This analysis and consideration of direct and possible audiences help create clear and concise writing and language that professional language requires.


Examples[edit]

  • Law – case studies, briefs, client correspondence
  • Marketing – advertising, market analysis, proposals
  • Science and Engineering – journals, technical data, manuals
  • Retail – inventory reports, damage reports, data sheets, manuals, labels
  • Entertainment – proposals, contracts, reviews, books
  • Publishing – web content, proposals, contracts, book editing
  • Military – operational reporting, orders production, policy or decision briefs, doctrine
  • writing a professional career overview

Skills[edit]

The core skills required in professional writing are good communication, organized thought, a high standard of grammar and language, clarity, and conciseness.[6] Skills may be acquired through practice or formal learning. While many practitioners of professional writing do so as a vocation rather than as full-time employment, the element of "professionalism" is what defines professional writing.[7] Such is the importance of professional writing in the modern world, many academic institutions offer courses up to degree level on the subject, with some tailored to specific professions such as social work.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Professional Writing.Purdue University College of Liberal Arts. Retrieved November 7, 2014.
  2. ^ Garay, Mary Sue, Bernhardt, Stephen. Expand Literacies: English teaching and the new workplace. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1990. Print.
  3. ^ Johnson-Sheehan, Richard. "Planning and Organizing Proposals and Technical Reports." https://owl.english.purdue.edu/media/pdf/20080628094326_727.pdf
  4. ^ Tebeaux, Elizabeth, Dragga, Sam. The Essentials of Technical Communication (3rd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. Print
  5. ^ Terk, Natasha (2010). Professional Writing Skills. Write it well. ISBN 978-0982447116. 
  6. ^ Tebeaux, Elizabeth (1985). Redesigning Professional Writing Courses to Meet the Communication Needs of Writers in Business and Industry. National Council of Teachers of English. 
  7. ^ "How to tell if you are a professional writer". Retrieved 13 December 2014. 
  8. ^ "Open University: Professional writing in social work". Retrieved 14 December 2014.