Progress MS-09

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Progress MS-09
Progress MS-09.jpg
Progress MS-09 docked at the ISS on 15 August 2018.
Mission typeISS resupply
OperatorRoscosmos
COSPAR ID2018-058A
SATCAT no.43537Edit this on Wikidata
Spacecraft properties
SpacecraftProgress MS-09 (No.439)
Spacecraft typeProgress-MS
ManufacturerRKK Energia
Start of mission
Launch date9 July 2018, 21:51:34 UTC
RocketSoyuz-2.1a
Launch siteBaikonur Site 31/6
ContractorRoscosmos
Docking with ISS
Docking portPirs nadir
Docking date10 July 2018
Time docked01:31:33 UTC
Progress ISS Resupply

Progress MS-09 (Russian: Прогресс МC-09), identified by NASA as Progress 70 or 70P, is a Progress spacecraft used by Roscosmos to resupply the International Space Station (ISS).

Launch[edit]

Progress MS-09 launched on 9 July 2018 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. It used a Soyuz-2.1a rocket.[1] NASA confirmed on June 28 that if Progress MS-09 launches on July 9, it will attempt a super fast-tracked rendezvous with the Station, docking to the ISS just 3 hours (2 orbits) after launch - making it the fastest orbital rendezvous ever-attempted with the Station.[2]

Docking[edit]

Progress MS-09 docked as scheduled with the nadir (the only) docking port of the Pirs module on 10 July 2018 at 01:31 UTC.

Cargo[edit]

The Progress MS-09 spacecraft is carrying about 2450 kg of cargo and supplies to the International Space Station. The spacecraft will deliver food, fuel and supplies, including 705 kg of propellant, 50 kg of oxygen and air, 420 kg of water.

Deorbit[edit]

When this craft deorbits, it will take the Pirs module off the station.

References[edit]

  1. ^ NASA Office of Inspector General (June 28, 2016). NASA’s Response to SpaceX’s June 2015 Launch Failure: Impacts on Commercial Resupply of the International Space Station (PDF) (Report). NASA Office of Inspector General. p. 13. Retrieved 2016-07-18.
  2. ^ Gebhardt, Chris (9 July 2018). "Progress MS-09 completes super fast 4-hour rendezvous with Space Station". NASASpaceflight.com. NASASpaceflight. Retrieved 9 July 2018.