Prokar Dasgupta

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Prokar Dasgupta

Professor Prokar Dasgupta.jpg
EducationUniversity of Calcutta
Known for
Awards
Scientific career
FieldsUrology
Institutions
Thesis (2000)
Academic advisorsClare Fowler
WebsiteOfficial website

Prokar Dasgupta FRCS(Urol), FEBU is an Indian surgeon and academic who is professor of surgery at the surgical academy at King's Health Partners, London, UK. Since 2002, he has been consultant urologist to Guy's Hospital, and in 2009 became the first professor of robotic surgery and urology at King's, and subsequently the chairman of the King's College-Vattikuti Institute of Robotic Surgery.

Early in his career, he was a medical research fellow to Clare Fowler at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen's Square, where they developed an outpatient procedure for treating urinary incontinence in people with an overactive bladder that did not respond to usual medical treatment. They were the first in the UK to use this method of injecting Botox into the bladder wall using a flexible cystoscope, and it subsequently became known as the "Dasgupta technique".

In 2005, he led the team that used a da Vinci robot to perform one of the early keyhole operations to retrieve a kidney as part of a kidney transplant, in Britain. Ten years later, he successfully removed a cancerous tumour from a mans prostate using a 3D-printed replica prostate as an aid to surgery.

From 2013 to 2020 he was editor-in-chief of the urology journal British Journal of Urology International (BJUI). His awards include the Fellowship of King's College in 2018 and St Peter's Medal from the British Association of Urological Surgeons (BAUS) in 2020.

Early life and education[edit]

Prokar Dasgupta is from India, where part of his childhood was spent in Lucknow, his mother's ancestral home city.[1] He received his medical degree from the University of Calcutta in 1989, and two years later gained a Diplomate of National Board, India.[2][3] He completed his FRCS in 1994 and as a Medical Research Council Fellow gained a masters in urology in 1996, FRCS in Urology in 2000 and MD from the University of London in 2001.[2][3] Before his work on problems of the bladder and prostate, his early research involved the study of the immunology of Leishmaniasis.[4]

Career[edit]

The overactive bladder[edit]

The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery

Dasgupta's research has included looking at the role and safety of the chilli component capsaicin.[5] In this field, he demonstrated an improvement in symptoms following a course of capsaicin instillation into the bladder in managing urinary incontinence due to an overactive bladder.[6] In 1998, his paper on the topic showed that in people treated with capsaicin instillation, bladder biopsies were normal after five years.[5]

Whilst working at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, as a medical research fellow to Clare Fowler, they developed a technique of injecting botox into the bladder wall to target bladder nerves for treating urinary incontinence due to an overactive bladder that did not respond to traditional measures and usual medications. They were the first in the UK to use this method using a flexible cystoscope.[7][8][9] The procedure does not require an operating room or general anaesthetic.[7][8] In 2002 he was appointed consultant urologist to Guy's Hospital.[2][10] Three years later, his Botox technique was presented at the 2005 BAUS Annual Scientific Meeting in Glasgow and became known as the 'Dasgupta technique'.[11][12] He was a co-principal investigator in the first randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study pertaining to the procedure, conducted at Guy's Hospital, and it was included as a second-line treatment for refractory overactive bladder by the UK's National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in 2006.[7][13] It was endorsed by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists in 2014, as a second-line option following failure of other treatments.[14] Others have since used and modified the procedure.[8]

Robotics[edit]

da Vinci robot

In 2005, Dasgupta led the team that used a da Vinci robot to perform one of the early keyhole operations to retrieve a kidney as part of a kidney transplant, in Britain.[15][16]

In 2009, he became the first professor of robotic surgery and urology at King's College London and subsequently was appointed chairman of the King's College-Vattikuti Institute of Robotic Surgery.[2][17][18][19] In 2014, he spoke at Pakistan's Sindh Institute of Urology & Transplantation with proposals to assist Pakistani surgeons with robotic surgery.[20] The following year he was appointed honorary director in the Department of Robotic Surgery at Apollo Gleneagles Hospitals, in Kolkata, India.[21]

In November 2015, he successfully removed a cancerous tumour from a mans prostate using a 3D-printed replica prostate as a pre-surgical aid.[22][23][24] The procedure was broadcast at the worldwide robotic surgery 24 hour event.[25]

In 2020, he was appointed professor of surgery at the surgical academy at King's Health Partners,[26] an academic health science centre in London, incorporating King's College London, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust.[27]

Journal editor[edit]

Between 2013 and 2020 he was editor-in-chief of the urology journal, BJU International (BJUI).[4][10] He sits on the Board of Studies, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Rishikesh.[28]

Charity work[edit]

He is involved in developing treatments for prostate cancer with King's College's Prostate Cancer Research Centre,[4] of which he is a trustee.[29] He is also a trustee of the prostate charities The Malcolm Coptcoat Trust.[30]

Awards and honours[edit]

The British Association of Urological Surgeons (BAUS) awarded Dasgupta the Karl Storz Harold Hopkins Golden Telescope award in 2006.[31] In 2017 he was awarded the Fellowship of the Linnaean Society. The following year he received the Fellowship of King's College.[10] He received the St Peter's Medal from the BAUS in 2020.[32][33]

He was president of the Hunterian Society for 2012-2013.[34][35]

Selected publications[edit]

Dasgupta has authored and co-authored over 1100 articles including more than 600 peer-reviewed papers in addition to 10 books and 25 chapters.[36]

Articles[edit]

Books[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dasgupta, P. (1 May 2014). "Flying high as a kite". BJUI. 113 (5): 683. doi:10.1111/bju.12738. PMID 24717056. S2CID 40496251. Archived from the original on 28 February 2021. Retrieved 28 February 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d "Professor Prokar Dasgupta - Professor of Urology | The London Clinic". www.thelondonclinic.co.uk. The London Clinic. 2020. Archived from the original on 21 February 2021. Retrieved 21 February 2021.
  3. ^ a b "Prokar Dasgupta - Biography - Research Portal, King's College, London". kclpure.kcl.ac.uk. King's College London. 2020. Archived from the original on 21 February 2021. Retrieved 21 February 2021.
  4. ^ a b c "King's Health Partners News". www.kingshealthpartners.org. King's Health Partners. 7 October 2020. Retrieved 17 January 2021.
  5. ^ a b Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang (15 April 2011). "The Two Faces of Capsaicin" (PDF). Cancer Research. 71 (8): 2809–2814. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-3756. ISSN 0008-5472. PMID 21487045.
  6. ^ Atala, Anthony; Slade, Debra (2012). Bladder Disease: Research Concepts and Clinical Applications. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 375. ISBN 978-1-4419-8889-8.
  7. ^ a b c Chancellor, Michael B.; Smith, Christopher P. (2011). "11. Perspectives from around the world". Botulinum Toxin in Urology. Springer. p. 190. ISBN 978-3-642-03579-1.
  8. ^ a b c Alemozaffar, mehrdad; Das, Anurag K. (2012). "136. Bladder injections for refractory overactive bladder". In Smith, Arthur D.; Preminger, Glenn; Badlani, Gopal H.; Kavoussi, Louis R. (eds.). Smith's Textbook of Endourology. Wiley-Blackwell. p. 1629. ISBN 978-1-4443-3554-5.
  9. ^ Jo Revill, health editor (13 April 2003). "Botox: now it's not just for wrinkles | UK news | The Observer". The Guardian. Retrieved 22 April 2014. {{cite web}}: |author= has generic name (help)
  10. ^ a b c "Dasgupta, Prokar - professor of surgery and honorary consultant urological surgeon". www.guysandstthomas.nhs.uk. Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust. Retrieved 9 January 2021.
  11. ^ Sahai, Arun; Kalsi, Vinay; Khan, Mohammad S.; Fowler, Clare J. (2006). "Techniques for the intradetrusor administration of botulinum toxin". BJU International. 97 (4): 675–678. doi:10.1111/j.1464-410X.2006.06063.x. ISSN 1464-410X. PMID 16536751. S2CID 29246933.
  12. ^ "2005 Glasgow | The British Association of Urological Surgeons Limited". www.baus.org.uk.
  13. ^ "Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust Release: First-of-Its-Kind Study Shows BOTOX(R) (Botulinum Toxin Type A) Significantly Improves Idiopathic Detrusor Overactivity (IDO) in Patients With Symptoms of Overactive Bladder". BioSpace. 15 May 2007. Archived from the original on 7 March 2021. Retrieved 7 March 2021.
  14. ^ Botulinum Toxin for an Overactive Bladder: Scientific Impact Paper No. 42 (PDF). Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. February 2014.
  15. ^ Highfield, Roger (18 May 2005). "Man gets new kidney thanks to girlfriend and robot". The Telegraph. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  16. ^ Dasgupta, Prokar; Hemal, Ashok; Rose, Kirsten (2005). "Robotic urology in the UK: establishing a programme and emerging role". BJU International. 95 (6): 723–724. doi:10.1111/j.1464-410X.2005.05386.x. ISSN 1464-410X. PMC 312278. PMID 1579476.
  17. ^ "Prokar Dasgupta". vfrsi.vattikutifoundation.com. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  18. ^ Donnelly, Laura; Taylor, Rosie (17 March 2018). "Million patients a year needlessly enduring major surgery as NHS hospitals are not adopting modern practices, research finds". The Telegraph. Telegraph. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  19. ^ "Review of October 2017 Meeting". Croydon Medical Society. 25 October 2017. Archived from the original on 23 February 2021. Retrieved 23 February 2021.
  20. ^ Mansoor, Hasan (26 November 2014). "Top UK surgeon to train Pakistani doctors in robotic surgery". DAWN.COM. Retrieved 9 January 2021.
  21. ^ "Prokar Dasgupta joins Apollo Gleneagles Hospitals as Honorary Director in the Department of Robotic Surgery". JustEarthNews. Retrieved 17 March 2021.
  22. ^ Initiative, Open BioMedical (5 March 2016). "London doctor uses 3D printed model to successfully remove prostate tumor". Open BioMedical Initiative - We Help. Retrieved 11 January 2021.
  23. ^ Gibbons, Katie (26 May 2016). "Doctors print 3D prostate to guide surgery". The Times. Retrieved 10 January 2021.
  24. ^ Kemp, Rob (1 June 2017). "Robo-Op: how robotic surgery is transforming the lives of prostate cancer sufferers". The Telegraph. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  25. ^ Belciug, Smaranda (2020). "4. Surgeon at work". Artificial Intelligence in Cancer: Diagnostic to Tailored Treatment. Elsevier. p. 189. ISBN 978-0-12-820201-2.
  26. ^ "Interview: Prokar Dasgupta". European Medical Journal. 23 August 2021.
  27. ^ "The partners". King's Health Partners. Archived from the original on 31 October 2010. Retrieved 5 November 2010.
  28. ^ "Journal of Medical Evidence : About us". www.journaljme.org. Archived from the original on 19 March 2021.
  29. ^ "Trustees". Prostate Cancer Research. Archived from the original on 16 March 2021. Retrieved 16 March 2021.
  30. ^ "Who we are". The Malcolm Coptcoat Trust. Archived from the original on 16 March 2021. Retrieved 16 March 2021.
  31. ^ "Medals & Awards". www.baus.org.uk. Retrieved 9 January 2021.
  32. ^ Summerton, Duncan (November 2020). "Welcome from the Immediate Past-President". Journal of Clinical Urology. 13 (1_suppl): 2. doi:10.1177/2051415820963007. ISSN 2051-4158. Retrieved 9 January 2021.
  33. ^ Celebrating the past present and future of Urology, preliminary program. British Association of Urological Surgeons 2020, 75th annual meeting program. November 2020, p.6.
  34. ^ "Surgical Grand Rounds - Professor Prokar Dasgupta — Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences". www.nds.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 13 January 2021.
  35. ^ "Hunteian Society: Programme of the 187th Session 2012-2013" (PDF). Hunterian Society. Retrieved 26 February 2021.
  36. ^ "Prokar Dasgupta". scholar.google.com. Retrieved 9 January 2021.

Further reading[edit]