Promazine

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Promazine
Promazine.svg
Promazine3d.png
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.comMicromedex Detailed Consumer Information
MedlinePlusa600010
ATC code
Pharmacokinetic data
Protein binding94%
Elimination half-life20-40 hr
Identifiers
  • N,N-dimethyl-3-(10H-phenothiazin-10-yl)-propan-1-amine
CAS Number
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
ChEBI
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard100.000.347 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC17H20N2S
Molar mass284.42 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • CN(C)CCCN1c2ccccc2Sc3c1cccc3
  • InChI=1S/C17H20N2S/c1-18(2)12-7-13-19-14-8-3-5-10-16(14)20-17-11-6-4-9-15(17)19/h3-6,8-11H,7,12-13H2,1-2H3 checkY
  • Key:ZGUGWUXLJSTTMA-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  (verify)

Promazine (brand name Sparine) is a medication that belongs to the phenothiazine class of antipsychotics.[1] An older medication used to treat schizophrenia, it is still prescribed, alongside newer agents such as olanzapine and quetiapine. It has predominantly anticholinergic side effects, though extrapyramidal side effects are not uncommon either. It readily dissolves in alcohol.

Promazine has been approved for human use in the United States, although it has been discontinued.[2] It is available in the US for veterinary use under the names Promazine and Tranquazine where it is primarily administered to horses, by intravenous or intramuscular injection, as a preanesthetic agent. It is generally understood to induce moderate sedation. It is also an antiemetic, antispasmodic and hypothermic agent.

Additionally it is used to lower blood pressure in animals suffering from laminitis and renal failure. [3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pagliaro LA, Pagliaro AM (1999). "PPDR: Promazine". Psychologist's Neuropsychotropic Desk Reference. Philadelphia: Brunner/Mazel. p. 535. ISBN 978-1-138-00968-4.
  2. ^ "Drugs@FDA: FDA-Approved Drugs". New Drug Application (NDA): 010942 Sparine. U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
  3. ^ "Promazine". EquiMed.