Prospero Intorcetta

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Prospero Intorcetta
Prospero Intorcetta.jpg
Prospero Intorcetta in 1671
Traditional Chinese
Simplified Chinese

Prospero Intorcetta (1626–1696), known to the Chinese as Yin Duoze, was an Italian Jesuit missionary to the Qing Empire.

Life[edit]

Prospero Intorcetta was born in Piazza Armerina in 1626.[citation needed]

Traveling with the French Jesuit Philippe Couplet, he reached China in 1659. There, he mostly worked in the Jiangnan region around the lower Yangtze River.[1]

He died in 1696.[citation needed]

Works[edit]

Confucius, Philosopher of the Chinese (1687).
The map of China in the 3rd book of the Confucius.

Intorcetta studied Chinese philosophy. In 1662, he published Ignacio da Costa's notes on the study of the Four Books of Confucianism in a Latin work entitled The Meaning of Chinese Wisdom.[2] In 1667, he published the Politico-Moral Knowledge of the Chinese (Sinarum Scientia Politico-moralis). In 1687, under Philippe Couplet's guidance, he worked with Christian Wolfgang Herdtrich and François de Rougemont to compile an influential Latin overview of Chinese history and translation of some of the Confucian classics under the title Confucius, Philosopher of the Chinese (Confucius Sinarum Philosophus).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Brockey, p.277
  2. ^ Brockey, p.279

Bibliography[edit]

  • Brockey, Liam Matthew (2007), Journey to the East: The Jesuit Mission to China, 1579-1724, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, ISBN 978-0-674-02448-9.
  • Intorcetta, Prospero; et al., eds. (1687), Confucius Sinarum Philosophus, sive, Scientia Sinensis Latine Exposita [Confucius, Philosopher of the Chinese, or, Chinese Knowledge Explained in Latin], Paris: Daniel Horthemels. (in Latin)
  • Paternicò, Luisa M. (2011), "Prospero Intorcetta and the Confucius Sinarum Philosophus", The Generation of Giants: Jesuit Missionaries and Scientists in China [in] the Footsteps of Matteo Ricci, Trent: Centro Studi Martino Martini, pp. 61–68.

External links[edit]