Pruneyard Shopping Center

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Roadside sign for The PruneYard Shopping Center

The Pruneyard Shopping Center is a 250,000 square foot (23,000 m²) open-air shopping center located in Campbell, California, at the intersection of Campbell Avenue and Bascom Avenue, just east of State Route 17. Built in the 1960s as the PruneYard Shopping Center, it includes in addition to shops an inn, as of July 2017 a DoubleTree by Hilton,[1] and a movie theater originally built in 1964 and also three office towers built in 1970, one of which is the tallest building in the area outside downtown San Jose.

History[edit]

Fred Sahadi developed the PruneYard Shopping Center as part of a mixed-use development on the site of the Brynteson Ranch, which he bought in 1968.[2] It was completed in 1970, designed to be an upscale shopping center.[3] In 2014 Ellis Partners and Fortress Investment Group LLC bought it from Equity Office.[4]

A major renovation and expansion began in 2017.[1] The movie theater, the first business to open in the mall in 1969 as the three-screen United Artists Movie Theater,[2] was renovated at the turn of the 21st century and became Camera 7;[5] it closed in April 2017[6] and reopened in April 2018 as the Pruneyard Cinemas, with cocktails delivered to patrons' seats and the Cedar Room restaurant in the former location of Boswell's, a 1970s fern bar.[7]

Pruneyard Shopping Center v. Robins[edit]

In the late 1970s, the mall was involved in a free speech dispute with local high school students that was ultimately decided by the U.S. Supreme Court on June 9, 1980.[8] The Pruneyard case established two important rules in American constitutional law:

  • Under The California Constitution, individuals may peacefully exercise their right to free speech in parts of private shopping centers regularly held open to the public, subject to reasonable regulations adopted by the shopping centers.
  • Under the U.S. Constitution, states can provide their citizens with broader rights in their constitutions than under the federal Constitution, so long as those rights do not infringe on any federal constitutional rights.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Jasmine Levya, "Pruneyard Shopping Center’s massive makeover off to a dramatic start", San Jose Mercury News, July 13, 2017, updated July 15, 2017.
  2. ^ a b Karen Brey, Campbell Historical Museum and Ainsley House, Campbell, Images of America, Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia, 2004, ISBN 0-7385-2917-6, p. 41.
  3. ^ "Signs of the Times", San Jose Mercury News, March 28, 2013.
  4. ^ Lauren Hepler, "Campbell Pruneyard sale inked; Expansion, better link to downtown coming", Silicon Valley Business Journal, October 23, 2014, updated October 27, 2014.
  5. ^ "Pruneyard Dine-In Cinemas", Cinema Treasures, retrieved April 23, 2018.
  6. ^ Sal Pizarro, "The end is very near for Campbell’s Camera 7 cinema", San Jose Mercury News, April 3, 2017, updated April 4, 2017.
  7. ^ Richard von Busack, "Dinner and a Movie", Metro Silicon Valley, April 18, 2018, p. 24.
  8. ^ Linda Greenhouse, "Petitioning Upheld at Shopping Malls: High Court Says States May Order Access to Back Free Speech", New York Times, June 10, 1980, p. A1.

External links[edit]


Coordinates: 37°17′21″N 121°56′02″W / 37.28908°N 121.93399°W / 37.28908; -121.93399