Prunus glandulosa

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Prunus glandulosa
Prunus glandulosa for. albiplena 02.JPG
Prunus glandulosa alboplena
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
(unranked):
(unranked):
(unranked):
Order:
Family:
Genus:
Subgenus:
P. subg. Prunus
Species:
P. glandulosa[1]
Binomial name
Prunus glandulosa
Synonyms[2]
  • Microcerasus glandulosa (Thunb.) M.Roem.
  • Prunus japonica Bean
  • Prunus pumilio Batsch
  • Prunus sinensis Pers.

Prunus glandulosa, called Chinese bush cherry, Chinese plum, and dwarf flowering almond, is a species of shrub tree native to China and long present in Japan. It is commonly used as an ornamental tree and for cut flowers.[1][3]

It has white or pink flowers - single or double varies with cultivar - that bloom in April. Fruits are dark red.[4] Its height is about 1.5 meters (4.9 ft) and prefers rocky slopes with plenty of sun. Leaves are alternating, pointy, and light green.[5][6] It is drought tolerant.[7] It is susceptible to mice as well as these diseases: fire blight, leaf spot, die back, leaf curl, powdery mildew, root rot, and honey fungus.[8]

Cultivars include: 'Alba' - (single white flowers), 'Alba Plena' (also 'Alboplena') - (double white flowers), 'Lawrence' - (single white-pink flowers), 'Rosea Plena' (also 'Sinensis') - (double pink flowers).[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Prunus glandulosa". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Retrieved November 11, 2014.
  2. ^ "The Plant List: A Working List of All Plant Species". Retrieved 12 November 2014.
  3. ^ "Flowering almond, Prunus glandulosa" (PDF). Horticulture Update. Texas A&M University. February 1996. Retrieved November 11, 2014.
  4. ^ "Dwarf Flowering Almond Prunus glandulosa". University of Illinois - Urbana. Retrieved November 11, 2014.
  5. ^ a b "Prunus glandulosa". University of Connecticut. Retrieved November 11, 2014.
  6. ^ "Prunus glandulosa - Thunb". Plants For a Future. Retrieved November 11, 2014.
  7. ^ "Dwarf Flowering Almond Prunus glandulosa". North Carolina State University. Retrieved November 11, 2014.
  8. ^ "Prunus glandulosa". Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved November 11, 2014.

External links[edit]