Psalm 11

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Psalm 11 is the 11th psalm from the Book of Psalms. In the Septuagint and Vulgate it is numbered as Psalm 10. Its authorship is traditionally assigned to king David, but most scholars place its origin some time after the end of the Babylonian captivity.[1]

Structure[edit]

The shape of the Psalms differs from the usual scheme, [2] which the species is unclear[clarification needed] and controversial. The Old Testament scholar Hermann Gunkel finally assigns it as a "confidence Psalm in the form of conversation" a. [1] Erhard S. Gerstenberger calls him a "disputierendes prayer" within the genus of Lamentations of an individual.[3] Hans-Joachim Kraus has the Psalm as a song of prayer.[4]

Usually, the Psalm is organized as follows:[5]

  1. Verse 1a: trust in YHWH
  2. Verse 1b-3: Rejecting the advice of well-meaning friends
  3. Verse 4-7: YHWH as fair judge and legal helpers of the persecuted

A division into verses is sometimes not done. [6]

Interpretation[edit]

The psalm is strongly individual. Klaus Seybold calls this the personal testimony of persecution, who have opted for the legal process[7] Hermann Gunkel agrees calling it the subjective response of a single poet to an involuntary emergency. Oswald Loretz called the Psalm a product of postexilic scriptural scholarship that seeks to streamline the texts of the tradition to interpret.[8][9] [10]

Uses[edit]

Catholic[edit]

According to the Rule of St. Benedict (530AD), Psalm 1 to Psalm 20 were mainly reserved for Office of Prime. This psalm was traditionally performed at the Office of Prime on Wednesday.[11]

In the current liturgy, Psalm 11 is, most solemnly recited or sung during vespers on Monday of the first Week.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Morgenstern, Julian. “Psalm 11.” Journal of Biblical Literature, vol. 69, no. 3, 1950, pp. 221–231., www.jstor.org/stable/3261644.
  2. ^ Hermann Gunkel, Die Psalmen.vol 6. (Auflage, Vandenhoeck&Ruprecht, Göttingen 1986), p 40.
  3. ^ Erhard S. Gerstenberger, Psalms. Part 1 (Ps 1–60) with an Introduction to Cultic Poetry. (Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, 1988), p.78.
  4. ^ Hans-Joachim Kraus,Psalmen 1–59. 7. Auflage, (Neukirchener Verlag, Neukirchen-Vluyn 2003), p228.
  5. ^ Vgl. Hans-Joachim Kraus, Psalmen 1–59. 7. Auflage, (Neukirchener Verlag, Neukirchen-Vluyn 2003), p229.
  6. ^ Oswald Loretz,Psalmstudien. Kolometrie, Strophik und Theologie ausgewählter Psalmen. (de Gruyter, Berlin 2002), p106
  7. ^ Klaus Seybold: Die Psalmen Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen 1996, p 60.
  8. ^ Oswald Loretz,Psalmstudien. Kolometrie, Strophik und Theologie ausgewählter Psalmen.(de Gruyter, Berlin 2002), p106.
  9. ^ Hermann Gunkel, Die Psalmen.vol 6. (Auflage, Vandenhoeck&Ruprecht, Göttingen 1986), p 40.
  10. ^ Erhard S. Gerstenberger, Psalms. Part 1 (Ps 1–60) with an Introduction to Cultic Poetry. Eerdmans, Grand Rapids 1988, p78f.
  11. ^ traduction par Prosper Guéranger, Règle de saint Benoît, (Abbaye Saint-Pierre de Solesmes, réimpression 2007) p46.
  12. ^ Le cycle principal des prières liturgiques se déroule sur quatre semaines.