Psalm 28

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Psalm 28 is the 28th psalm from the Book of Psalms.

This psalm "is a prayer: (1) expostulating with Yahweh for abandoning His people in peril of death, and crying aloud for help, with hands uplifted towards the holy shrine (v.1-2); (2) urging that He discriminate between them and their enemies, visiting the latter with retribution for their deeds (v.3-4); (3) blessing Yahweh, the strength and shield, and rejoicing in Him as the refuge for king and people (v.6-8). Glosses give a reason for the imprecation upon enemies (v.5) and a liturgical petition for salvation (v.9)."[1]

Charles and Emilie Briggs suggest that it is to be dated to "the late Babylonian period shortly before the exile" which occurred in 587 or 586 BCE.[2][3]

Uses[edit]

Judaism[edit]

  • Verse 9 is the first verse of the paragraph Hoshia Et Amecha of Pesukei Dezimra.[4] This verse, because of its 10 words, is often used for counting for the ten people needed for a minyan, as Jewish law forbids the numerical counting of people.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Quote from Charles Augustus Briggs; Emilie Grace Briggs (1960) [1906]. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Book of Psalms. International Critical Commentary. 1. Edinburgh: T & T Clark. p. 245. 
  2. ^ For the quote see Charles Augustus Briggs; Emilie Grace Briggs (1960) [1906]. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Book of Psalms. International Critical Commentary. 1. Edinburgh: T & T Clark. p. 246. 
  3. ^ For the date of the exile, see Arthur J. Bellinzoni. Old Testament: An Introduction to Biblical Scholarship. Prometheus Books, Publishers. p. 349. ISBN 978-1-61592-264-2. 
  4. ^ The Complete Artscroll Siddur page 64