Psalm 40

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Psalms scroll.

Psalm 40 is the 40th psalm from the Book of Psalms.[1][2][3][4][5]

Interpretation[edit]

Matthew Henry calls the psalm a "Confidence for deliverance. (1-5) Christ's work of redemption. (6-10) and a Prayer for mercy and grace. (11-17)"[6] While some see in it the prophetic[7] of Jesus[8][9] or messiah generally.[10]

John Westley saw it as a prayer[11] of salvation.

Structure[edit]

The first part of the Psalm (verses 1-11) is one in the series of psalms of thanksgiving of an individual.

Verses 13-18 set originally possibly an independent Psalm context, because it is virtually identical to Psalm 70. This part belongs more in the group of psalms of lament.

Uses[edit]

Judaism[edit]

Music[edit]

The Psalm was used in the song 40, also known as "How Long", the final track from U2's 1983 album, War.

A song by The Mountain Goats titled "Psalm 40:2" appears on their 2009 album The Life of the World to Come, inspired by the same verse.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Commentaires sur les psaumes, d’Hilaire de Poitiers, (Paris, Éditions du Cerf, 2008), collection sources chrétiennes n°515,
  2. ^ Commentaires of the Psalmes, by saint Johnn Chrysostome
  3. ^ Discourse of the Psalmes, by Saint Augustin, vol.2,(Sagesses chrétiennes)
  4. ^ Commentairy (jusqu’au psaume 54), by saint Thomas Aquinas, (Éditions du Cerf, 1273)
  5. ^ Jean Calvin, Commentaire des psalmes, 1557
  6. ^ Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary.
  7. ^ Psalms 40:6-9.
  8. ^ PSALM 40 overview.
  9. ^ Charles Spurgeon,Treasury of David.
  10. ^ Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible.
  11. ^ John Wesley’s Explanatory Notes.
  12. ^ The Complete Artscroll Machzor for Rosh Hashanah page 353
  13. ^ The Complete Artscroll Siddur page 62
  14. ^ The Complete Artscroll Siddur page 125