Pseudoips prasinana

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Pseudoips prasinana
Pseudoips prasinana1.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Class:
Order:
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Genus:
Species:
P. prasinana
Binomial name
Pseudoips prasinana
(Linnaeus, 1758)
Synonyms
  • Phalaena prasinana Linnaeus, 1758
  • Pyralis fagana Fabricius, 1781
  • Pyralis sylvana Fabricius, 1794
  • Hylophila fiorii Constantini, 1911
  • Hylophila japonica Warren, 1913
  • Halias quercana
  • Pseudoips fagana

Pseudoips prasinana, the green silver-lines is a moth of the family Nolidae, common in wooded regions, and having a wingspan of 30–35 mm. It is found in the Palearctic realm (North and Central Europe, Russia, Siberia, Korea, Japan).

Pseudoips prasinana2.jpg
Caterpillar
Illustration from John Curtis's British Entomology Volume 6

Technical description and variation[edit]

Forewing yellow green; costal edge pink, diffused towards apex; inner marginal area pink-suffused, except towards base; inner and outer lines oblique, darker green, conversely edged with white, the outer sometimes pink; subterminal line white, curved into apex: fringe pink with a white line at base; hindwing yellow; fringe pale pink, white at tips from apex to vein 2: abdomen white, dorsally suffused with yellow; in the female the abdomen is white, tinged with brown at base: forewing with costal edge white, and inner margin yellow; hindwing white. In the British form, subspecies P. p. britannica subsp. nov. (53 k), all the three lines are silvery white; the costal and inner margins in the male reddish only at apex and tornus respectively; in the ab. P. p. rufilinea ab. nov. (= ab. 2 Hmps.) (53 k) the outer line is marked with red. Larva apple green coarsely shagreened with yellow; the subdorsal line yellow; segment 2 red rimmed in front.[1] The wingspan is 30–35 mm.

Biology[edit]

The moth flies from June to July depending on the location stridulating on the wing. In August the larvae feed on oak, birch and several other deciduous trees.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Warren. W. in Seitz, A. Ed., 1914 Die Großschmetterlinge der Erde, Verlag Alfred Kernen, Stuttgart Band 3: Abt. 1, Die Großschmetterlinge des palaearktischen Faunengebietes, Die palaearktischen eulenartigen Nachtfalter, 1914Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. ^ Robinson, Gaden S.; Ackery, Phillip R.; Kitching, Ian J.; Beccaloni, George W. & Hernández, Luis M. (2010). "Search the database - introduction and help". HOSTS - A Database of the World's Lepidopteran Hostplants. Natural History Museum, London.

Further reading[edit]

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