Puce

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This article is about the color. For the school, see Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador.
Puce
 
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #722F37
sRGBB  (rgb) (114, 47, 55)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 59, 52, 55)
HSV       (h, s, v) (353°, 59%, 45[1]%)
Source ISCC-NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Puce is a dark red or purple brown color,[2] a brownish purple[3] or a "dark reddish brown."[4]

Etymology[edit]

Puce is the French word for flea. The color is said to be the color of bloodstains on linen or bedsheets, even after being laundered—or from a flea's droppings, or after a flea has been crushed.

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) dates the first English use of "puce" as a color to 1778.[5] The name comes from the French word puce, or flea, which comes from the Latin words for flea, pulicem or pulex. According to the Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology, the first French use of puce as a color name, meaning flea-color, dates to the 17th century.[6] A different source dates the first French use of puce as a color name to the 14th century.[7]

Puce green[edit]

Puce green dates back to at least 1810, when green tea was described as "puce green" in color.[8] This phrase is still found today in the UK and the US, where it means a "pea soup" color. Hypotheses that this usage comes from misappropriation or derivation from "puke green" or "pus green" are purely speculative.

History[edit]

The color puce became popular in the late 18th century in France. It appeared in clothing at the Court of Louis XVI, and was said to be a favorite color of Marie Antoinette, though there are no portraits of her wearing it.

Puce was also a popular fashion color in 19th century Paris. In one of his novels, Émile Zola described a woman "dressed in a gown of a dark color...between puce and the color of goose excrement (caca d'oie)."[9] Victor Hugo, in Les Misérables wrote, "[...] Mademoiselle Baptistine gentle, slender, frail, somewhat taller than her brother, dressed in a gown of puce-colored silk, of the fashion of 1806, which she had purchased at that date in Paris, and which had lasted ever since."[10]

Variations of puce[edit]

Puce (ISCC-NBS)[edit]

Puce (ISCC-NBS)
 
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #722F37
sRGBB  (rgb) (114, 47, 55)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 59, 52, 55)
HSV       (h, s, v) (353°, 59%, 45[1]%)
Source ISCC-NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

The color to the right is the color called puce in the ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955). Since this color has a hue code of 353, it is a slightly purplish red.

The source of this color is: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Puce (color sample #16)

Puce (Maerz and Paul)[edit]

Puce (M&P)
 
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #A95C68
sRGBB  (rgb) (169, 92, 104)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 46, 39, 34)
HSV       (h, s, v) (351°, 46%, 66[11]%)
Source Maerz and Paul
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

The color box to the right shows the color called puce in the 1930 book by Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill; the color puce is displayed on page 37, Plate 7, Color Sample H4.

Puce (Pourpre color list)[edit]

Puce (Pourpre color list)
 
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #4E1609
sRGBB  (rgb) (78, 22, 9)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 72, 89, 69)
HSV       (h, s, v)

(11°, 89%, 31

[12]%)
Source Pourpre.com
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

At right is the color called puce in the Pourpre.com color list, a color list widely popular in France. This is the original puce, from which all other tones of puce ultimately derive.[citation needed]

Puce (Pantone)[edit]

Puce (Pantone)
 
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #4F3A3C
sRGBB  (rgb) (79, 58, 60)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 27, 24, 69)
HSV       (h, s, v) (354°, 27%, 31[13]%)
Source Pantone TPX[14]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

The color at right is called puce in the Pantone color list.

The source of this color is the "Pantone Textile Paper eXtended (TPX)" color list, color #19-1518 TPX—Puce.[15]

In popular culture[edit]

  • In the vintage-bottle-collecting hobby, "puce" is amongst the most desirable colors.[16]
  • In the Dilbert comic strip, the boss's favorite color is puce, but he does not know that because he is mistakenly thinking of a primary color, as he does not know what puce is.[17]
  • In the made-for-TV movie Dance 'til Dawn (1988), the prom theme is "Paris in Puce."[18] The theme is chosen by Christina Applegate's character, who also wears a puce gown, so that she can be "the only girl here who goes with the room."[19]
  • In the comedy horror film Fright Night (2011), Anton Yelchin's character wears collector's shoes referred to as being puce-colored, with Colin Farrell's character proclaiming, "It takes a real man to wear puce."[20]
  • French Queen Marie Antoinette's (1755–1793) favorite color was puce.[21]
  • In the King Arthur legends, Sir Gareth fights Sir Perymones, who is a knight called The Puce Knight.[22][23]
  • In Ulysses, Buck Mulligan wants "puce gloves" to go with his "green boots."[24]
  • In Santa Claus: The Movie (1985), a toy company develops a new candy (infused with magic so people fly when they eat it); because it is inherently colorless, and they need to pick a dye, one of the accountants suggests they go with puce. When asked what "puce" is, he says "it's like fuchsia, but with a shade less lavender and a bit more pink".
  • In Desk Set (1957), Spencer Tracy's character answers one of the phones in the reference department and takes a message regarding the reduced price of a black velvet, strapless dress and asks, "With what kind of a scarf? Puce? I know how to spell it ... P-U-C-E.." [25]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code #722F37 (Puce Red):
  2. ^ Oxford English Dictionaries on-line
  3. ^ Webster's New World Dictionary, Third College Edition: "a brownish purple."
    - Random House College Dictionary: "a dark or brownish purple,"
  4. ^ "Brun rouge assez foncé." Le Petit Robert (1988).
  5. ^ "puce" in Oxford English Dictionary, 3rd ed,
  6. ^ The Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology, (1966) Oxford University Press
  7. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 202; Color Sample of Puce: Page 37 Plate 7 Color Sample H4--the color sample shown as puce in Maerz & Paul is a tone of puce halfway between the U.S. and U.K. versions of puce: Puce (Maerz & Paul)
  8. ^ Cadet, C. L. (September 1810). "On the Unwholesomeness of Tea". The Medical and Physical Journal. XXIV (139): 189. Retrieved 10 April 2015. 
  9. ^ "Vétue d'une robe sobre...entre le puce et le caca d'oie." Le Petit Robert.
  10. ^ Wikisource:Les Misérables/Volume 1/Book Second/Chapter 2
  11. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code #A95C68 (Deep Puce):
  12. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code #4E1609 (French Puce):
  13. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #4F3A3C (Dark Puce):
  14. ^ Type the word "Puce" into the indicated window on the Pantone Color Finder and the color appears.
  15. ^ Pantone TPX Pantone Color Finder--Type the word "Puce" into the indicated window on the Pantone Color Finder and the color appears:
  16. ^ von Mechow, Tod (September 30, 2010). "Bottle Attributes – Beer Bottle Colors". Soda & Beer Bottles of North America. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  17. ^ Adams, Scott (c). Dilbert. August 17, 1993. Official Dilbert comic strips Archive.
  18. ^ "Topic: Puce". eNotes. Retrieved December 2, 2011. 
  19. ^ Panarese, Tom (April 27, 2011). "Dance 'til Dawn". Pop Culture Affidavit. Retrieved December 2, 2011. 
  20. ^ Beifuss, John (August 19, 2011). "'Fright Night' - A Review: Never Cross a Vampire". The Bloodshot Eye. Retrieved December 2, 2011. 
  21. ^ Victoria Finlay, Color.
  22. ^ Smith, Bret (December 25, 2008). "Paladin (Part 3C) – The Knights of the Round Table (con't)". The Grumblin' Grognard. Retrieved December 3, 2011. 
  23. ^ Search result, Puce Knight: Sir Thomas Malory; Keith Baines (October 12, 2001). Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur: King Arthur and the Legends of the Round Table : The Classic Rendition. Penguin. pp. 146, 147, 149, 152, 159. ISBN 978-0-451-52816-2. Retrieved December 3, 2011. 
  24. ^ Don Gifford with Robert J. Seidman, Ulysses Annotated: Notes for James Joyce's Ulysses, 2nd Edition, University of California Press, 1989, p. 22.
  25. ^ "Desk Set Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn movie". www.script-o-rama.com. Retrieved 2016-12-24.