Puce

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Puce
 
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#CC8899
sRGBB  (rgb)(204, 136, 153)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k)(0, 33, 25, 20)
HSV       (h, s, v)(345°, 33%, 80%)
Source99colors.net
ISCC–NBS descriptorDark pink
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Puce is a dark red or purple brown color,[1] a brownish purple[2] or a "dark reddish brown."[3]

Etymology[edit]

Puce is the French word for flea. The color is said to be the color of bloodstains on linen or bedsheets, even after being laundered, from a flea's droppings, or after a flea has been crushed.

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) dates the first English use of "puce" as a color to 1778.[4] The name comes from the French word puce, or flea, which comes from the Latin word for flea, pulex (stem pulic-). According to the Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology, the first French use of puce as a color name, meaning flea-color, dates to the 17th century.[5] A different source dates the first French use of puce as a color name to the 14th century.[6]

History[edit]

The color puce became popular in the late 18th century in France. It appeared in clothing at the Court of Louis XVI, and was said to be a favorite color of Marie Antoinette, though there are no portraits of her wearing it.

Puce was also a popular fashion color in 19th-century Paris. In one of his novels, Émile Zola described a woman "dressed in a gown of a dark color...between puce and the color of goose poop (caca d'oie)."[7] Victor Hugo wrote in Les Misérables, "[...] Mademoiselle Baptistine gentle, slender, frail, somewhat taller than her brother, dressed in a gown of puce-colored silk, of the fashion of 1806, which she had purchased at that date in Paris, and which had lasted ever since."[8]

Variations of puce[edit]

Puce (ISCC-NBS)[edit]

Puce (ISCC-NBS)
 
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#722F37
sRGBB  (rgb)(114, 47, 55)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k)(0, 59, 52, 55)
HSV       (h, s, v)(353°, 59%, 45[9]%)
SourceISCC-NBS
ISCC–NBS descriptorDark red
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

The color to the right is the color called puce in the ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955). Since this color has a hue code of 353, it is a slightly purplish red.

Puce (Maerz and Paul)[edit]

Puce (M&P)
 
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#A95C68
sRGBB  (rgb)(169, 92, 104)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k)(0, 46, 39, 34)
HSV       (h, s, v)(351°, 46%, 66[10]%)
SourceMaerz and Paul
ISCC–NBS descriptorModerate red
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

The color box to the right shows the color called puce in the 1930 book by Maerz and Paul, A Dictionary of Color;[11] the color puce is displayed on page 37, Plate 7, Color Sample H4.

Puce (Pourpre color list)[edit]

Puce (Pourpre color list)
 
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#4E1609
sRGBB  (rgb)(78, 22, 9)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k)(0, 72, 89, 69)
HSV       (h, s, v)(11°, 89%, 31 [12]%)
SourcePourpre.com
ISCC–NBS descriptorDeep brown
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

At right is the color called puce in the Pourpre.com color list, a color list widely popular in France. This is the original puce, from which all other tones of puce ultimately derive.[citation needed]

Puce (Pantone)[edit]

Puce (Pantone)
 
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#4F3A3C
sRGBB  (rgb)(79, 58, 60)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k)(0, 27, 24, 69)
HSV       (h, s, v)(354°, 27%, 31[13]%)
SourcePantone TPX[14]
ISCC–NBS descriptorDark grayish reddish brown
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

The color at right is called puce in the Pantone color list.

The source of this color is the "Pantone Textile Paper eXtended (TPX)" color list, color #19-1518 TPX—Puce.[15]

In popular culture[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionaries on-line
  2. ^ Webster's New World Dictionary, Third College Edition: "a brownish purple."
    - Random House College Dictionary: "a dark or brownish purple,"
  3. ^ "Brun rouge assez foncé." Le Petit Robert (1988).
  4. ^ "puce" in Oxford English Dictionary, 3rd ed,
  5. ^ The Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology, (1966) Oxford University Press
  6. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 202; Color Sample of Puce: Page 37 Plate 7 Color Sample H4--the color sample shown as puce in Maerz & Paul is a tone of puce halfway between the U.S. and U.K. versions of puce: Puce (Maerz & Paul)
  7. ^ "Vétue d'une robe sobre...entre le puce et le caca d'oie." Le Petit Robert.
  8. ^ Wikisource:Les Misérables/Volume 1/Book Second/Chapter 2
  9. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code #722F37 (Puce Red):
  10. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code #A95C68 (Deep Puce):
  11. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York: 1930 McGraw-Hill
  12. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code #4E1609 (French Puce):
  13. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #4F3A3C (Dark Puce):
  14. ^ Type the word "Puce" into the indicated window on the Pantone Color Finder and the color appears.
  15. ^ Pantone TPX Pantone Color Finder--Type the word "Puce" into the indicated window on the Pantone Color Finder and the color appears:
  16. ^ von Mechow, Tod (September 30, 2010). "Bottle Attributes – Beer Bottle Colors". Soda & Beer Bottles of North America. Retrieved October 18, 2011.
  17. ^ Smith, Bret (December 25, 2008). "Paladin (Part 3C) – The Knights of the Round Table (con't)". The Grumblin' Grognard. Retrieved December 3, 2011.
  18. ^ Search result, Puce Knight: Sir Thomas Malory; Keith Baines (October 12, 2001). Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur: King Arthur and the Legends of the Round Table : The Classic Rendition. Penguin. pp. 146, 147, 149, 152, 159. ISBN 978-0-451-52816-2. Retrieved December 3, 2011.
  19. ^ Don Gifford with Robert J. Seidman, Ulysses Annotated: Notes for James Joyce's Ulysses, 2nd Edition, University of California Press, 1989, p. 22.