Corn pudding

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Corn pudding
Pudding Corn.jpg
Alternative namesPudding corn, puddin' corn, hoppy glop, spoonbread
TypePudding
Place of originUnited States
Region or stateSouthern United States
Main ingredientsMaize, water

Corn pudding (a.k.a. pudding corn, puddin' corn, hoppy glop, spoonbread)[1][2] is a creamy food product prepared from stewed corn, water, any of various thickening agents, and optional additional flavoring or texturing ingredients.[3] It is typically used as a food staple in rural communities in the Southern United States,[3] especially in Appalachia.[2]

Corn pudding has sometimes been prepared using "green corn", which refers to immature ears of corn that have not fully dried.[2][4] Green corn is not necessarily green in color.[2] The cooking of the corn pulp when preparing the dish can serve to thicken it.[5]

Corn pudding is sometimes served as a Thanksgiving dish.[6]

Similar dishes[edit]

Pudding corn is not to be confused with hasty pudding, which is typically made from ground corn, rather than whole kernel corn.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Albert, S.W. (2015). The Darling Dahlias and the Eleven O'Clock Lady. Darling Dahlias. Penguin Publishing Group. p. pt151. ISBN 978-0-698-18564-7. Retrieved November 15, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d Willis, Virginia (September 5, 2014). "Baked Corn Pudding - Down-Home Comfort". Food Network. Retrieved November 15, 2018.
  3. ^ a b Westmoreland, S.; Allen, B. (2004). Good Housekeeping Great American Classics Cookbook. Hearst Communications. p. 179. ISBN 978-1-58816-280-9. Retrieved November 15, 2018.
  4. ^ Wade, M.L. (1917). The Book of Corn Cookery: One Hundred and Fifty Recipes Showing how to Use this Nutritious Cereal and Live Cheaply and Well. A. C. McClurg & Company. p. 85. Retrieved November 15, 2018.
  5. ^ Fussell, B.H. (1992). The story of corn. Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. p. 187. ISBN 978-0-394-57805-7. Retrieved November 15, 2018.
  6. ^ The Wisconsin Agriculturist. A. Simonson. 1907. p. 15. Retrieved November 15, 2018.
  7. ^ Smith, A.F. (2013). Food and Drink in American History: A "Full Course" Encyclopedia [3 Volumes]: A "Full Course" Encyclopedia. EBSCO ebook academic collection. ABC-CLIO. p. 435. ISBN 978-1-61069-233-5. Retrieved November 15, 2018.

Further reading[edit]