Puerto Princesa International Airport

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Puerto Princesa International Airport

Paliparang Pandaigdig ng Puerto Princesa
Puerto Princesa International Airport Outside 1.jpg
The New Puerto Princesa International Airport
Summary
Airport typePublic
OperatorCivil Aviation Authority of the Philippines
ServesPuerto Princesa
LocationBarangay San Miguel, Puerto Princesa, Palawan
Hub for
Elevation AMSL22 m / 71 ft
Coordinates09°44′31″N 118°45′32″E / 9.74194°N 118.75889°E / 9.74194; 118.75889Coordinates: 09°44′31″N 118°45′32″E / 9.74194°N 118.75889°E / 9.74194; 118.75889
Map
PPS/RPVP is located in Philippines
PPS/RPVP
PPS/RPVP
Location in the Philippines
Runways
Direction Length Surface
m ft
09/27 2,600 8,530 Asphalt/Concrete
Statistics (2018)
Passengers2,146,350
Increase 19.90%
Aircraft movements20,087
Increase 26.84%
Cargo (in kg)16,968,071
Decrease 0.23%
Source: eFOI[3]

Puerto Princesa International Airport (Filipino: Paliparang Pandaigdig ng Puerto Princesa; ) (IATA: PPS, ICAO: RPVP) is an airport serving the general area of Puerto Princesa, located in the province of Palawan in the Philippines. It is classified as an international airport by the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines.

The airport is the main gateway to the Puerto Princesa Underground River, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the New 7 Wonders of Nature.

History[edit]

World War II[edit]

The airport was built by American POWs during the World War II from August 1942 to September 1944. It was used to accommodate large Japanese transport aircraft to complement the grass airstrip south of the present-day location of NCCC Mall Palawan in Lacao Street. The airstrip was constructed by hand by the POW using crushed corals for illuminating night landings. The finished airfield has an area of 7,200 ft by 675 ft with two runways.

On December 14, 1944, occupying Japanese soldiers herded 150 remaining American POWs who had constructed the air strip on Palawan Island (today’s Puerto Princesa International Airport and Antonio Bautista Air Base) into air raid trenches, doused them with gasoline, set them afire, then machine-gunned and bayoneted them to death. Among them was Army Capt. Fred Bruni, the Palawan POWs’ senior officer, who was from Janesville, Wisconsin with the 192nd Tank Battalion. Only eleven men escaped the “Palawan Massacre” to be rescued by guerrillas. The story of their ordeal persuaded General Douglas MacArthur that the rumored order for the retreating Japanese to “kill all” prisoners was being implemented, thus his rush to liberate the Philippines.

Imperial Japanese Army Air Force units based there were:

  • 2nd Air Division (September 1944 – Early 1945)
  • 71st Sentai Squadron (September 1944 – Early 1945)

After liberation of the Palawan in April 1945, a number US Army Air Forces units were stationed at the airport facility. These included:

Post war[edit]

US Army and Navy Engineers of the 1897th Engineer Aviation Battalion and the 84th Naval Construction Battalion immediately rehabilitated the facility and completed as a military airbase on March 18, 1945. The Army and Navy engineers further expand the airfield, strengthening the runway by laying steel Marston Mats and concrete, adding air control facilities and tanks to store oil and aviation fuel.

During the 1950s, President Ramon Magsaysay opened Puerto Princesa to air travel. The first scheduled route, operated by Philippine Airlines (Philippine Air Lines), was from Puerto Princesa to San Jose, Mindoro and vice versa. By late 90s, Puerto Princesa Airport welcomed its first wide-body aircraft service with Airbus A300 dubbed as the "Love Bus" operated by Philippine Airlines.

Fate of old terminal[edit]

As of January 2018, Philippine Airlines still operates their ticketing office at the east side of the old terminal near the old control tower. Air Juan utilizes a hangar at the west side of the old terminal.

The old terminal is near the general aviation area and aircraft that have no parking space use that area.

Terminals and structure[edit]

New passenger terminal complex[edit]

To meet the growing air transportation demands of Puerto Princesa and the Province of Palawan, the Department of Transportation (DOTr) awarded the $82.9-million (P2.616 billion) contract to the Kumho Industrial Co. Ltd. GS Engineering & Construction Joint Venture (Kumho-GS), a South Korean company for the construction of new passenger terminal and cargo terminal building, a new apron with 6 aircraft bays (4 for narrow body and 2 for wide body aircraft as large as the Airbus 330, Airbus 350 and boeing 787), connecting taxiways, new state-of-the-art air navigation system, and other support facilities in compliance with the international civil aviation standards set by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). The project was completed 30 months (approximately two years) from the groundbreaking rites.

The new passenger terminal complex has an upgraded handling capacity of 2 million passengers annually, with an estimated peak passenger flow of 690 passengers per hour. It was officially inaugurated last 3 May 2017 and opened for commercial operations on the next day, May 4, 2017.[4]

Runway[edit]

The airport consists of a single 2,600 meter (8,530 ft.) x 45 m. (approx. 148 ft.) wide runway running at a direction 09°/27°. The airport shares its single runway with Antonio Bautista Air Base. The runway is equipped with an Instrument Landing System, runway lights, and approach landing lights making the airport capable of nighttime operations as well as low visibility landings.

Statistics[edit]

Data from Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines (CAAP).[5][3]

Passenger movements[edit]

Year Domestic International Total Change
2003 195,975 0 195,975 Steady
2004 271,769 161 271,930 Increase 38.76%
2005 267,778 0 267,778 Decrease 1.53%
2006 284,110 0 284,110 Increase 6.10%
2007 392,039 0 392,039 Increase 37.99%
2008 444,878 0 444,878 Increase 13.48%
2009 584,186 0 584,186 Increase 31.31%
2010 807,916 0 807,916 Increase 38.30%
2011 988,972 0 988,972 Increase 22.41%
2012 1,322,925 0 1,322,925 Increase 33.77%
2013 1,357,531 12,894 1,370,425 Increase 3.59%
2014 1,371,651 6,929 1,378,580 Increase 0.60%
2015 1,564,914 26,804 1,591,718 Increase 15.46%
2016 1,612,640 31,363 1,644,003 Increase 3.28%
2017 1,767,157 22,958 1,790,115 Increase 8.89%
2018 2,046,628 99,722 2,146,350 Increase 19.90%

Aircraft movements[edit]

Year Domestic International Total Change
2003 3,346 0 3,346 Steady
2004 4,390 12 4,402 Increase 31.56%
2005 3,916 0 3,916 Decrease 11.04%
2006 3,780 0 3,780 Decrease 3.47%
2007 4,538 0 4,538 Increase 20.05%
2008 4,990 0 4,990 Increase 9.96%
2009 4,236 0 4,236 Decrease 15.11%
2010 3,760 0 3,760 Decrease 11.24%
2011 4,248 0 4,248 Increase 12.98%
2012 12,046 0 12,046 Increase 183.57%
2013 10,512 2,684 13,196 Increase 9.55%
2014 13,130 224 13,354 Increase 1.20%
2015 14,222 184 14,406 Increase 7.88%
2016 13,813 191 14,004 Decrease 2.79%
2017 15,682 155 15,837 Increase 13.09%
2018 19,404 683 20,087 Increase 26.84%

Cargo movements[edit]

An em dash (—) is used when data from CAAP is not available.

Year Domestic (in kg) International (in kg) Total (in kg) Change
2003 5,001,051 0 5,001,051 Steady
2004 4,500,599 4,500,599 Decrease 10.01%
2005 4,744,915 0 4,744,915 Increase 5.43%
2006 3,912,209 0 3,912,209 Decrease 17.55%
2007 4,480,615 0 4,480,615 Increase 14.53%
2008 4,580,557 0 4,580,557 Increase 2.23%
2009 5,439,799 0 5,439,799 Increase 18.76%
2010 8,972,631 0 8,972,631 Increase 64.94%
2011 9,294,017 0 9,294,017 Increase 3.58%
2012 10,938,901 0 10,938,901 Increase 17.70%
2013 12,699,299 12,699,299 Increase 16.09%
2014 15,038,825 15,038,825 Increase 18.42%
2015 14,278,467 133,614 14,412,081 Decrease 4.17%
2016 17,136,857 116,870 17,253,727 Increase 19.72%
2017 16,173,990 833,190 17,007,180 Decrease 1.43%
2018 16,955,042 13,029 16,968,071 Decrease 0.23%

Airlines and destinations[edit]

AirlinesDestinations
Air Juan Busuanga, Cuyo, Sipalay, San Vicente, Taytay
AirSWIFT El Nido, Busuanga
Cebu Pacific Cebu, Clark (begins October 9, 2019),[6] Iloilo, Manila
Eastar Jet Seoul–Incheon
Philippine Airlines Manila
Philippine Airlines
operated by PAL Express
Cebu, Clark, Manila
Philippines AirAsia Cebu, Clark, Manila
Royal Air Philippines Cebu,[7] Clark
Tigerair Taiwan Taipei–Taoyuan[8]

Accidents and incidents[edit]

  • On January 11, 2011, a Cebu Pacific Airbus 319 registered as RP-C3190 with 129 passengers and 6 crews on board swerved off the runway upon landing after touchdown. Though the pilot maneuvered the aircraft back to the runway, the aircraft sustained substantial damage on its nose and main landing gear with other damages on the left and right engine fan blades, aircraft underbelly and underwings. No one on board was injured.[9]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Air Juan Philippine Flight Destinations". Air Juan Aviation, Inc. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  2. ^ "Philippines AirAsia (PAA) to make Palawan 4th Hub - The Exciting Centennial of Philippine Aviation". Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  3. ^ a b "eFOI - Electronic Freedom of Information - Request". eFOI - Electronic Freedom of Information. Retrieved 21 March 2019.
  4. ^ "Puerto Princesa International Airport Terminal opens on May 4 - Palawan News". Palawan News. Retrieved 2017-05-03.
  5. ^ Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines (23 July 2018). "Yearly Passenger, Cargo and Aircraft Movements of all airports in the Philippines 1997-2017". Republic of the Philippines - Freedom of Information Portal. Retrieved 13 August 2018.
  6. ^ https://www.routesonline.com/news/29/breaking-news/283313/cebu-pacific-to-expand-from-cebu-and-clark-hubs/
  7. ^ https://www.routesonline.com/news/38/airlineroute/284106/royal-air-philippines-launches-cebu-service-from-late-may-2019/
  8. ^ http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2019/04/09/2003713061
  9. ^ "Aircraft Accident Investigation and Inquiry Board Aircraft Accident Report" (PDF). CAAP. Retrieved 2017-12-30.

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Air Force website https://www.af.mil.

External links[edit]