Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting has been awarded since 1953, under one name or another, for a distinguished example of investigative reporting by an individual or team, presented as a single article or series in print journalism. The Pulitzer Prize is only given to journalists whose works have appeared in US newspapers, drastically limiting the number of journalists and scope of investigative reporting that may be awarded.[1] It is administered by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York City.

From 1953 through 1963, the category was known as The Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting, No Edition Time. From 1964 to 1984, it was known as The Pulitzer Prize for Local Investigative Specialized Reporting.[2]

The Pulitzer Committee issues an official citation explaining the reasons for the award.

Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting, No Edition Time[edit]

Pulitzer Prize for Local Investigative Specialized Reporting[edit]

Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Entry Form for a Pulitzer Prize In Journalism" (PDF). pulitzer.org. Jan 2011. Retrieved 2018-03-27. 
  2. ^ Heinz-D Fischer; Erika J. Fischer (1 January 2003). Complete Historical Handbook of the Pulitzer Prize System 1917-2000. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 118, 124. ISBN 978-3-11-093912-5. 
  3. ^ "The Pulitzer Prizes | Citation". Pulitzer.org. April 2014. Retrieved April 15, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Investigative Reporting". The Pulitzer Prizes. Retrieved 20 April 2015. 
  5. ^ "Investigative Reporting". Retrieved 11 April 2017. 
  6. ^ "The 2018 Pulitzer Prize Winner in Investigative Journalism". Pulitzer. Retrieved 20 June 2018. 

References[edit]